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EARNCon 2017: Phoenix

The 2017 EARN Conference will continue EARN’s multi-year campaign to support state and local efforts to raise wages, strengthen labor standards and pursue a state economic agenda to benefit working families. Members from EARN’s 79 groups across 43 states will convene with leading economic thinkers, policy experts, members of the labor movement, social services providers, community organizers, faith leaders, and academic researchers to think collectively about critical emerging issues in state policymaking, and discuss policies and strategies to lift up working families during pivotal 2018 issue debates.

Arizona’s rich history offers a unique backdrop against which to discuss economic justice. The Grand Canyon State has been a key battleground on water rights for Native American communities, civil rights, and some of the most stringent anti-immigration legislation in recent years. Yet in the most recent election cycle, voters in the city of Flagstaff approved a schedule which would raise the city minimum wage to $15.50 by 2022 and voted to gradually raise and eliminate the separate tipped minimum wage – the first city in the country to do so. The Arizona experience represents many of the challenges activists and policymakers seeking to fight injustice–racial, economic, and otherwise–must confront: a rapidly changing population, a justifiable sense among average working families that the economy they know has stalled, and a political climate in which progressive policy victories often must start at the local level. This year’s conference picks up where last year’s in St. Louis left off: seeking to understand and confront these challenges, so that economic policies that will help working families can be achieved even in states where progressive policy changes can be harder to put in place.

The agenda will include workshops on:

  • Unstable schedules, their effect on families, and how innovative laws and technology can bring stability
  • Economic development strategies for rural areas
  • State options to expand overtime protections, stop exploitative financial advisers and make the case for good regulation
  • Lessons learned from anti-immigrant legislation in Arizona and Texas
  • City-level labor enforcement: how some cities are innovating, and what can be done in those states where state law preempts local action
  • Paid family and medical leave – the success in Washington state and what it means for other states
  • How employment contracts are being used to limit workers’ rights and suppress wages, and what to do about it
  • Hands-on training, with instruction in basic microdata analysis, key economic concepts for policy analysts, and how to boil complex economic reports down to understandable language

Conference dates: October 25–27, 2017*

*A pre-conference meeting for EARN state group executive directors will take place on Wednesday, October 25th at 1:00 pm. On-site registration for all attendees will open Wednesday, October 25th at 4:00 pm. Program will run until Friday, October 27th at 3:00 pm.

Pointe Hilton Squaw Peak Resort
7677 North 16th Street
Phoenix, Arizona 85020, USA
Tel: 1-602-997-2626

 Detailed agenda Contact the organizers 

| Workshop and plenary materials

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Agenda [anchor id="agenda"]

Wednesday, Oct. 25

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Registration

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  • Location: Registration area
  • Time: 4:00–7:00 pm

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Dinner

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  • Location: Anasazi Courtyard 1
  • Time: 5:00–7:00 pm

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Introductory remarks

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  • Location: Navajo
  • Time: 7:00–7:30 pm
  • Session: Plenary

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Tom Steyer of NextGen America will provide opening remarks to kick off the conference.

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  • Tom Steyer, NextGen America
    Introduced by Chris Hoene, California Budget & Policy Center

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Opening plenary: Welcome to Phoenix

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  • Location: Navajo
  • Time: 7:30–9:00 pm
  • Session: Plenary

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Throughout the latter half of the 20th century, Phoenix was an epicenter of conservative political and policy development. More than those in any other Southwest city, lawmakers in Phoenix pioneered the idea of nurturing a “favorable business climate”—shorthand for undermining the power of unions, reducing regulation, and shifting the tax burden to homeowners and consumers—as a means to entice companies to move from existing industrial strongholds. To achieve their free-enterprise vision, Phoenix’s conservative political leaders employed tactics (systematic disenfranchisement) and rhetoric (stoking racial resentment) that would foreshadow today’s politics and the rise of the so-called “populist right.”

Yet Arizona today also offers glimmers of hope for policymakers, advocates, and ordinary citizens looking to build a more economically inclusive future. Organizing efforts, catalyzed in the wake of Arizona’s SB 1070 anti-immigration legislation, led to a successful ballot campaign for a $12 minimum wage and paid sick leave. Voters in Flagstaff also approved their own $15.50 minimum wage, with eventual elimination of the lower tipped minimum wage. Organizers and politicians are finding ways to speak to voters about economic justice in ways that cross party lines. In this session, you will learn about Phoenix’s past and how the state’s civic and community leaders are working toward a more progressive future.

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  • Rep. Rebecca Rios, Arizona House of Representatives
  • Elizabeth Tandy Shermer, Loyola University Chicago
  • Tomas Robles, Living United for Change in Arizona (LUCHA)

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Welcome reception

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  • Location: Anasazi Courtyard 1
  • Time: 9:00–11:00 pm

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Thursday, Oct. 26

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Group run

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  • Location: Meet in hotel lobby
  • Time: 6:45 am

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A group of EARN members will lead a morning jog.

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Breakfast

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  • Location: Ballroom 2nd floor veranda
  • Time: 7:30–8:30 am

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Plenary: Going on the offense: Strategic state and local action for working families

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  • Location: Navajo
  • Time: 8:40–9:55 am
  • Session: Plenary

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Dominant forces in Washington and in many states are actively dismantling laws and regulations meant to support workers and their families. In this session, Heidi Shierholz, EPI’s director of policy, will provide an overview of opportunities for defensive and offensive action in response to congressional and executive movement to undermine working families. Terri Gerstein will highlight opportunities to protect workers through state action outside of the legislative arena, including action by state and local labor departments, district attorneys, state attorneys general. José Garza will describe options for leveraging local governmental entities and incentives for worker-friendly employer behavior. Jon Whiten, from New Jersey Policy Perspectives, will serve as moderator and will also share his perspective on working to spur state action on the overtime rule.

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  • Moderator: Jon Whiten, New Jersey Policy Perspective
  • José Garza, Texas Workers Defense Project
  • Terri Gerstein, Open Society Foundations
  • Heidi Shierholz, Economic Policy Institute

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Session 1.1 | 10:05–11:20 am

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Training: EARN Data 101: Introduction to EARN data offerings and analytical tools

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  • Location: Yucca
  • Time: 10:05–11:20 am
  • Session: 1.1

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This session is meant as an introduction or refresher for some of the most popular data tools available to members through EARN. The session will open with a discussion of State Jobs Day tools and best practices. Thereafter, we will move through the suite of State of Working XX materials available to EARN members, highlighting the breadth of the resources available, where to find them, and how they can be used. The session will be interactive, and attendees are encouraged to bring laptops to participate in application exercises. The session will also touch briefly on state productivity data, trends in income inequality, and immigration data. A generous amount of time will be set aside for questions.

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  • Janelle Jones, Economic Policy Institute / EARN
  • Jessica Schieder, Economic Policy Institute / EARN

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Unstable work schedules and their effects on families: How innovative research can advance policy change and promote stability for parents and children

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  • Location: Palo Verde
  • Time: 10:05–11:20 am
  • Session: 1.1

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Millions of working people—especially those in retail, restaurant, and other low-wage, service-sector jobs—are subject to “just-in-time” scheduling practices that result in unpredictable and unstable work schedules, with little advance notice and shifts that vary wildly from week to week. These schedules are particularly problematic for parents: without sufficient notice or control over work hours, it can be impossible for a parent to take a sick child to the doctor, attend parent-teacher conferences, budget for expenses, or otherwise plan a life for herself and her family. This volatility can also have a negative impact on children’s well-being and makes it especially hard for parents to afford and access the high-quality child care that would provide needed stability for their children and help prepare them for school.

Addressing unfair work schedules is a relatively new frontier—but researchers and advocates are meeting the challenge with new tools, and new policies are advancing across the country: since 2014, cities including San Francisco, Seattle, and New York City have passed laws that provide scheduling protections for retail and/or food service workers, and Oregon Governor Kate Brown recently signed the first statewide fair scheduling protections into law.

This panel brings together researchers and advocates to share key findings and strategies that can advance fair scheduling policies—and, in turn, make a meaningful difference for working families. Together, panelists will review what both qualitative and quantitative research shows about the impact of unfair scheduling practices on family/child well-being and child care; share innovative approaches to filling the gaps in this emerging field of research; and discuss how the research and messaging strategies recently deployed in Oregon propelled a successful advocacy campaign to produce policy change that will benefit working parents and their children.

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  • Moderator: Andrea Johnson, National Women’s Law Center
  • Kate Hamaji, Center for Popular Democracy
  • Daniel Schneider, University of California Berkeley
  • Hannah Taube, Oregon Working Families
  • Julie Vogtman, National Women’s Law Center

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Economic development in rural areas: An honest discussion about what can be done

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  • Location: Cholla
  • Time: 10:05–11:20 am
  • Session: 1.1

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The 2016 presidential election. The opioid crisis. The Case-Deaton research on mortality rates. J.D. Vance. The maker movement. Over the past year, we have heard a lot about rural America and rightly so. Yet too often discussions of the country’s nonurban areas are ill-informed at best, and patronizing or exploitative at worse. Fortunately, EARN groups are already providing a more thoughtful voice on these issues and we want to strengthen and amplify that voice. In order to build state economies that truly work for everyone, we need to be well equipped to understand the conditions, challenges, needs, and desires of rural communities—as well as the policy options available for us to support them. In this workshop, we will present new EARN resources for analyzing nonmetro and rural portions of each state, as well as policy options that states, localities, and researchers have put forth to strengthen rural economies. We will also facilitate a clear-eyed discussion of the challenges and opportunities for progress.

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  • Sarah Austin, Maine Center for Economic Policy
  • Ted Boettner, West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy
  • James Parrott, Center for New York City Affairs (CNYCA) at The New School
  • David Cooper, Economic Policy Institute/EARN

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EPI president’s greeting: Introducing Thea Lee

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  • Location: Navajo
  • Time: 11:30–11:55 am
  • Session: Plenary

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In late September, the board of directors of the Economic Policy Institute announced that economist Thea Lee will serve as the Institute’s next president, effective January 1, 2018. Lee has spent her career advocating on behalf of working families in the national policy debate, addressing wage inequality, workers’ rights, and fair trade, among other issues. Lee will use this opportunity to address EARN formally for the first time since the board’s announcement was made.

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  • Thea Lee, Economic Policy Institute

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Lunch plenary: Race and class—the inseparable elements of our economic past, present, and future

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  • Location: Navajo
  • Time: 12:00–1:30 pm
  • Session: Plenary

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Never has it been clearer that the successful pursuit of economic inclusion and greater racial and economic equality require us to navigate public attitudes—as well as our own—about race and class. No economic equity agenda can discount race as both a historic determinant of current economic disparities and as a distorting influence on public support for reform. Class, too, plays a role in how Americans respond to efforts to improve economic conditions. This panel will explore how race and class are playing out in the public mind and what the implications are for economic policy in the states.

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  • Moderator: Amy Hanauer, Policy Matters Ohio
  • Matt Barreto, Latino Decisions/UCLA
  • Clarissa Martínez-de-Castro, UnidosUS
  • Matt Morrison, Working America

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Session 1.2 | 1:35–2:50 pm

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The loss of the federal overtime rule: A case study on the decimation of a crucial federal worker protection rule and discussion of restoring the protection through state action

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  • Location: Yucca
  • Time: 1:35–2:50 pm
  • Session: 1.2

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The entire notion of regulation is under attack in Washington. Rather than seeing rules as a way to assure that working people get a fair return on their work, business interests have convinced the public that regulations stifle business and restrict freedom. This environment is fertile ground for the Trump administration to begin the systematic dismantling of core protections across the federal government. As this occurs, state policymakers and advocates are seeking to restore rights and protections imperiled at the national level. This session will explore how to push back against the broad assault on federal regulations. It will also offer poll-tested suggestions on how to make the case for regulatory action. The session will focus in on the Obama administration overtime rule as a case study on federal regulatory backtracking, and will discuss how states can act to restore lost overtime protections.

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  • Stephen Herzenberg, Keystone Research Center
  • Sam Munger, SiX
  • Heidi Shierholz, Economic Policy Institute

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Lessons learned from anti-immigrant legislation in Arizona and Texas

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  • Location: Palo Verde
  • Time: 1:35–2:50 pm
  • Session: 1.2

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This conversation-style panel discussion will look at anti-immigration legislation enacted in Arizona (SB1070 in 2010) and Texas (SB4 in 2017). The panelists from Arizona will share how SB1070: (1) negatively impacted economic growth and tourism in Arizona; (2) led to the creation and growth of several new Latino advocacy organizations whose growing power were instrumental in the recall of State Senator Russell Pearce (the sponsor of SB1070); the defeat and criminal indictment of Sheriff Joe Arpaio; and the registration of 150,000 new Latino voters; and (3) has laid the foundation for proactive advocacy campaigns for policies that will create better economic opportunities for all Arizonans. The panelist from Texas will discuss what role, if any, the Arizona experiences from SB1070 played in Texas’ policymaking, and will discuss ways in which the political and community dynamics in Texas around SB4 compare and contrast with Arizona’s SB1070 experience. Finally, all of the panelists will share lessons learned from their experiences building the coalitions that were created in response to the anti-immigrant legislation and how those lessons are transferable to other types of proactive advocacy campaigns in other states.

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  • Moderator: David Lujan, Arizona Center for Economic Progress
  • Petra Falcon, Promise Arizona
  • Abril Gallardo, LUCHA Arizona
  • James Garcia, Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
  • José Garza, Texas Workers Defense Project

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Funding education: Charter schools, taxation, and the future of public education

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  • Location: Cholla
  • Time: 1:35–2:50 pm
  • Session: 1.2

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The session will discuss case studies of state-level research aimed at slowing the unregulated growth of the charter industry, imposing accountability on charter operators, and protecting the fiscal health of traditional public schools.

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  • Noah Berger, Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center
  • Amy Hanauer, Policy Matters Ohio
  • Gordon Lafer, University of Oregon Labor Education and Research Center

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Coffee and snack break

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  • Location: Saguaro
  • Time: 2:50–3:25 pm

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Session 1.3 | 3:25–4:40 pm

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Training: EARN Data 201: Key methods and economic concepts for policy analysts

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  • Location: Yucca
  • Time: 3:25–4:40 pm
  • Session: 1.3

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This training session will provide three lessons in data-oriented policy analysis. We will first cover the whys and hows of indexing, such as inflation indexing. We will also explain how to adjust employment rates to account for the aging of the workforce. Finally, we will discuss how to discern the main strengths and weaknesses of existing policy analysis research, using minimum wage studies as an example.

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  • Ben Zipperer, Economic Policy Institute

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Paid family and medical leave: Policy lessons from recent victories

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  • Location: Palo Verde
  • Time: 3:25–4:40 pm
  • Session: 1.3

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Panelists will discuss lessons learned from the recent victories in Washington state and elsewhere, what research tells us about policy design options, and how EARN groups can support campaigns in their states.

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  • Moderator: Marilyn Watkins, Economic Opportunity Institute
  • Sarah Jane Glynn, National Academy of Social Insurance
  • Sen. Gayle Goldin, Rhode Island State Senate and Family Values @ Work

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What to do about preemption

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  • Location: Cholla
  • Time: 3:25–4:40 pm
  • Session: 1.3

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Now that conservative forces control the majority of both chambers of state legislatures and 33 governorships, conservative state legislators have increasingly used preemption laws to strike down local government efforts to improve the quality of life for working people in their municipalities. In fact, many states are stripping away an entire package of basic labor and employment rights from workers in many cities, including the ability for workers to earn paid sick days, work under fair shift scheduling practices, and earn prevailing wages in safe, stable conditions on local government-funded construction projects. This panel will discuss what can be done to protect local labor and employment standards in the face of state resistance.

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  • Moderator: Marni Von Wilpert, Economic Policy Insitute
  • Andrew Bradley, Indiana Institute for Working Families
  • Lauren Kuby, Tempe City Council
  • Joaquin Rios, SiX
  • Rebecca Smith, National Employment Law Project
  • Sam Munger, SiX

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EARN group excursions

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  • Location: Various locations
  • Time: 5:00 pm

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Interested in visiting the Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix? Want to take a drive up to Phoenix’s South Mountain Park to see the sun set from Dobbins viewpoint? Excited to check out the Fall Music in the Garden Concert Series?

If so, chances are other EARNers are interested too. EARN members and staff will coordinate group excursions to these Phoenix destinations and others.

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Friday, Oct. 27

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Group run

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  • Location: Meet in hotel lobby
  • Time: 6:45 am

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A group of EARN members will lead a morning jog.

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Breakfast

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  • Location: Ballroom 2nd floor veranda
  • Time: 7:30–8:30 am

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Session 2.1 | 8:40–9:55 am

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Training: EARN Data 301: Intro to microdata analysis in STATA

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  • Location: Yucca
  • Time: 8:40–9:55 am
  • Session: 2.1

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This training session will introduce how to use STATA for basic data analysis. We will cover how to import data, calculate basic summary statistics, create graphics, export an analysis, and follow best practices for data management and programming. We will illustrate these concepts using several datasets, including CPS microdata from EPI’s State of Working America Data Library.

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  • Ben Zipperer, Economic Policy Institute

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Are states prepared for the next recession? How to strengthen and modernize state UI systems and other safety net programs

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  • Location: Palo Verde
  • Time: 8:40–9:55 am
  • Session: 2.1

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In 2007, the United States entered its worst recession in decades, with long-term unemployment in many states at record highs. Unemployment Insurance was and is a lifeline for many workers and their families, but it is inaccessible or inadequate for far too many others due to restrictive eligibility rules, outdated benefit levels, insufficient duration, or onerous application requirements. In some states, this was because of a failure to modernize their UI systems, while others have implemented policies that directly suppress the receipt of benefits. This workshop will explore what states can do to improve their UI systems and other safety net systems—particularly food assistance—in preparation for the next economic downturn. It will also discuss the key role UI plays in supporting workers following humanitarian disasters, such as the three hurricanes that ravaged parts of the U.S. in September 2017.

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  • Liz McNichol, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
  • Peter Ruark, Michigan League for Public Policy
  • Maurice Emellem, National Employment Law Project

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City-level enforcement: How city labor policy offices are changing the landscape for worker protections

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  • Location: Cholla
  • Time: 8:40–9:55 am
  • Session: 2.1

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In the wake of decades of declining job standards, a growing number of cities are pursuing a range of innovative strategies to raise standards and enhance protections for workers, most notably by passing new laws that establish markedly higher minimum wages and other new minimum labor rights. A number of these cities also have established or are working to establish their own local labor standards offices to ensure that new rights can be successfully claimed in practice. This panel will provide insight into what is involved in creating these new offices, the kinds of policies they are enforcing, and the role that research and policy development have to play in supporting their efforts to strengthen labor standards at the local level.

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  • Moderator: Sam Krinsky, New York City Office of Labor Policy and Standards
  • Cliff Bryson, City of Flagstaff
  • Karina Bull, City of Seattle
  • Adam Kader, Arise Chicago
  • Liz Vladeck, Office of Labor Policy & Standards at NYC Department of Consumer Affairs

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Session 2.2 | 10:00–11:15 am

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Employment contracts as stealth vehicles to undermine worker rights: what we can do about it

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  • Location: Yucca
  • Time: 10:00–11:15 am
  • Session: 2.2

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Increasingly, newly hired employees—from fast-food workers to high-tech managers—sign away a wide range of rights and liberties through the contracts they are required to endorse in order to finalize their employment. These contracts often contain clauses that prevent them from working in the future for a business considered to be a competitor, preclude them from suing their employer in the public court system, deny them the right to join a class-action suit with other workers against their employer, shorten the statute of limitations the law allows for them to bring a suit against their employer, and forbid the disclosure of compensation to other employees. Taken together, these provisions of employment contracts can severely restrict workers’ rights to change jobs, get redress when an employer has violated their rights, and come together with coworkers to seek better pay and working conditions.  Yet, frequently, workers are unaware that their employment contracts contain such provisions.

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  • Matt Capece, United Brotherhood of Carpenters (via teleconference)
  • Terri Gerstein, Open Society Foundations
  • Heidi Shierholz, Economic Policy Institute

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Rapid response research strategies

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  • Location: Palo Verde
  • Time: 10:00–11:15 am
  • Session: 2.2

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Since President Trump’s election and inauguration, adverse policies that target immigrants and workers have been moving forward at a heightened pace. It can be challenging to document the impact of these policies in a fast and timely manner. Gathering experiences through standard applied research methods can take years to develop and implement. This panel will explore rapid response tools and strategies for when workers are under threat, bad policy is moving quickly, or political events demand a response. Can technology provide new avenues for data collection? How do we ensure data security? What are ways we can leverage existing data quickly to impact policy? In what ways can rapid response techniques be employed offensively in policy campaigns?

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  • Sanjay Pinto, The Worker Institute at Cornell University
  • Gabriel Sanchez, UC Berkeley Labor Center
  • Diego Sepulveda, UCLA Labor Center
  • Saba Waheed, UCLA Labor Center

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State tax tools to address income inequality

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  • Location: Cholla
  • Time: 10:00–11:15 am
  • Session: 2.2

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Our state and local tax codes are indirectly contributing to growing income inequality by taxing low- and middle-income households at significantly higher rates than wealthy taxpayers. To be sure, upside-down state tax systems didn’t cause the growing income disparity, but they certainly exacerbate the problem. Creating more fair state tax systems should be an economic imperative. Addressing income inequality through state and local tax codes requires asking more from those at the top, and reducing reliance on low- and moderate-income taxpayers.

In this workshop we will explore:
– The latest income inequality data for the states
– ITEP’s Tax Inequality Index, which measures the effects of each state’s tax system on income inequality
– State and local tax policy tools to address income inequality, including options for raising taxes on top-income earners (millionaire taxes, surcharges, etc.) and options for reducing reliance on low- and moderate-income households (EITCs and other low-income credits, etc.)
– Recent successes in improving the progressivity of state and local taxes and preventing top-heavy tax cuts from being enacted, with a discussion of best practices for advocates
– Messaging tips for talking about taxes and income inequality

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  • John Burbank, Economic Opportunity Institute
  • Lisa Christensen Gee, Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy
  • Liz McNichol, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

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Session 2.3 | 11:20 am–12:35 pm

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Overcoming the challenges of policy communications

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  • Location: Yucca
  • Time: 11:20 am–12:35 pm
  • Session: 2.3

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Often under-resourced and tasked with explaining complicated subjects in a crowded media landscape, nonprofit policy communicators face unique challenges. Hear from national and state communicators about what works and what doesn’t, and how they break through the noise to translate research into communications products and efforts that get noticed, get quoted, and move the ball forward.

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  • Moderator: Kayla Blado, Economic Policy Institute
  • Alan Barber, Center for Economic and Policy Research
  • Caitlin Cook, West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy
  • Dan Crawford, Economic Policy Institute
  • Matthew Streib, Economic Opportunity Institute

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[earn-event]

Working group: EARN in the south—A cross-state initiative on a working-families-first agenda

[earn-details]

  • Location: Palo Verde
  • Time: 11:20 am–12:35 pm
  • Session: 2.3

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[earn-description show]

Historically, EARN has supported work in states on a range of efforts to improve conditions for working families. Yet the specific initiatives have often seemed beyond the reach of groups operating in conservative areas, leaving them feeling that they cannot be full participants in an agenda for working families. At the 2016 EARN conference, a workshop titled “EARN in the Red” invited attendees to discuss how EARN can better support work in conservative areas. Subsequent discussions led to a September 2017 meeting in Atlanta, where representatives from 12 Southern EARN groups and advocacy/organizing collaborators from each state discussed the challenges of work in the South and began developing a shared framework for advancing worker-centric economic policy in the region. In this discussion session, participants from the Atlanta meeting will refine and expand on ideas for cross-state work and consider strategies for funding, engagement, and other resources. Other interested EARN groups are welcome to participate.

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[earn-speakers show]

  • Moderator: Allan Freyer, North Carolina Justice Center

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[earn-event]

Middle skill jobs and the pathways into them

[earn-details]

  • Location: Cholla
  • Time: 11:20 am–12:35 pm
  • Session: 2.3

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[earn-description show]

Many jobs in the hospitality industry—front desk, cook (chef de partie/line cook), bartender, server, room attendant/housekeeper, etc.—can elevate workers to the middle class. Working at union hotels or properties, many workers in these jobs are paid $20/hour or more and receive a pension and health and welfare benefits, which combine to lift them into the middle class. Through labor-management partnerships, low-income workers facing barriers to employment can obtain the training—both skills-based and soft-skill training—that allows them to improve their economic prospects and change their lives.

[/earn-description]

[earn-speakers show]

  • Moderator: John Brauer, California Labor Federation
  • Marie Downey, Boston Education, Skills & Training (BEST)
  • Adine Forman, Hospitality Training Academy (HTA)
  • Aldo Muirragui, SEIU Local 32BJ

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[earn-event highlight]

Leadership from within: How state economic agendas can guide positive action at home and in Washington

[earn-details]

  • Location: Navajo
  • Time: 12:40–2:15 pm
  • Session: Plenary

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[earn-description show]

In the absence of compelling leadership from Washington, state leaders are stepping up to provide a vision of progressive action for the environment, the economy, and working families. For EARN and its state partners and collaborators, this offers opportunities to provide thought-leadership on innovative responses to a wide range of state challenges. Ultimately, these efforts can undergird state action, and help build an enduring constituency for policies that produce a vibrant, sustainable, and equitable economy for the country.

[/earn-description]

[earn-speakers show]

  • Angela Glover Blackwell, PolicyLink
  • Manuel Pastor, University of Southern California

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[earn-event highlight]

Office hours: Graphic design

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  • Location: Saguaro
  • Time: Various

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[earn-description show]

  • Wednesday, October 25: 3:00–5:00 pm
  • Thursday, October 26: 10:00–11:30 am
  • Friday, October 27: 10:00–11:00 am

Do you wish your charts were easier to understand? Do you have trouble translating your work for social media? Do you need help thinking through how to create an infographic or share graphics? Is your organization working on building a new website (or should it be)?

Dan Essrow, graphic designer and associate online and creative director at EPI, will be holding office hours during the EARN Conference to help EARN members think through their visual content challenges.

Bring a report that you wish were an infographic, bring a chart you’d like to simplify, bring a tweet that could benefit from a graphic, or just bring a sketch you’ve been thinking about. We will help you think through your challenge and offer some practical steps forward.

[/earn-description]

[earn-speakers show]

  • Dan Essrow, Economic Policy Institute

[/earn-speakers]

[/earn-event]

[earn-section id="presenters" hide]

Presenters

Sarah Austin, Maine Center for Economic Policy (MECEP)

Sarah is MECEP’s policy lead on tax and budget issues. She conducts research and impact analyses, writes educational materials, and collaborates with partners. Sarah is skilled in data collection, research, and statistical and policy analysis. Sarah holds a Master of Public Affairs degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s La Follette School of Public Affairs and a Bachelor of Science in environmental policy from Maine’s Unity College.

Matt Barreto, Latino Decisions / UCLA

@realMABarreto

Matt A. Barreto is Professor of Political Science and Chicana/o Studies at UCLA and the co-founder of the research and polling firm Latino Decisions (LD). Time Magazine called Latino Decisions the “gold-standard in Latino American polling” and The Guardian wrote that Latino Decisions is “the leading Latino political opinion research group” in the United States. In 2015, Barreto was hired by the Hillary Clinton presidential campaign to run polling and focus groups on Latino voters. In 2010, Barreto implemented the first ever weekly tracking poll of Latino voters during the 2010 election, which LD continued in 2012. Working closley with Gary Segura, he has also overseen large multi-state election-eve polls, battleground tracking polls, extensive message testing research, and countless focus groups. He received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, Irvine in 2005, and had been on the faculty at the University of Washington for 10 years before joining UCLA in 2015.

Noah Berger, Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center

@MassBudget

Noah Berger is president of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, an independent research organization that produces non-partisan policy research, analysis, and data-driven recommendations focused on improving the lives of low- and middle-income children and adults, strengthening the state’s economy, and enhancing the quality of life in Massachusetts. Prior to joining the center, Berger served as counsel and policy director for the Massachusetts Senate Committee on Ways and Means from 1993 to 1996 and as policy director for the Massachusetts Senate President from 1996 to 2002.

Noah serves on the advisory boards of the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center, the Economic Analysis Research Network, and the Tax Alliance for Economic Mobility. He graduated from Harvard College and has a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Kayla Blado, Economic Policy Institute

@KaylaBlado

Kayla Blado joined the Economic Policy Institute as a media relations specialist in 2016. She has worked for a variety of workers’ rights organizations, such as Change to Win and Workers’ Independent News. Previously, Kayla produced several radio shows, including a popular morning news magazine on Wisconsin Public Radio. Kayla also served as an AmeriCorps volunteer in rural Wisconsin, where she helped disabled farmers acquire assistive equipment. She currently serves on the board of New Leaders Council-DC, a progressive political training institute for young professionals.

Ted Boettner, West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy

@WVpolicywonk

As the co-founding Executive Director of the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy, Ted brings a wealth of experience and understanding of state fiscal issues. In addition to running the Center, Ted is the author of numerous reports on state tax and budget issues, economic development, and family economic security, including the annual “State of Working West Virginia.” Ted frequently presents policy proposals to the West Virginia Legislature and testifies before committees. He also regularly addresses statewide civic groups on state tax, budget, and economic policies and is frequently quoted in news stories on those topics. In 2011, The State Journal named Ted “one of the most influential businesses leaders” in West Virginia. Ted also serves on the board of directors of Cabin Creek Health Systems, Legal Aid of West Virginia, The Dunn Foundation, and Mountain State Justice. He has also taught at West Virginia University Institute of Technology and West Virginia University. Ted holds a B.S. in journalism from West Virginia University and a M.A. in political science from the University of New Hampshire.

Andrew Bradley, Indiana Institute for Working Families

@ABradleyIN

Andrew Bradley is Senior Policy Analyst at the Indiana Institute for Working Families. Andrew focuses on workforce development, higher education, and economic development research and policy work. Andrew also coordinates the activities of the Indiana Skills2Compete Coalition, and is a member of several working groups including the state’s Management Performance Hub Research Advisory Group and the State Workforce Innovation Council’s career counseling and future of work taskforces. Andrew earned his bachelor’s degree in History from Indiana University-Bloomington and his master’s degree in the Social Sciences from the University of Chicago.

John Brauer, California Labor Federation

John Brauer is Executive Director of Workforce and Economic Development at the California Labor Federation.  He was executive director at the Oakland Army Base Workforce Development Collaborative from 2001 to 2012 and was county planner at the Alameda County Housing and Community Development Department from 1995 to 2001. Brauer was a grant writer and fund developer at Catholic Charities of the East Bay from 1992 to 1995. Brauer earned his Master’s degree in Public Administration at California State University, East Bay.

Cliff Bryson, City of Flagstaff

Cliff Bryson is the Office of Labor Standards Manager for the City of Flagstaff. Cliff served has a Community Code Compliance Officer with the city prior to being appointed. Cliff oversees internal policies/procedures development, compliance investigations, and educational outreaches with Flagstaff’s new minimum wage ordinance. Previously, Cliff worked for the Arizona Department of Public Safety as a State Trooper, Detective with the State Gang Task Force and supervisor. Cliff works with at-risk youths and is involved with volunteer services as a member of Verde Community Church. He earned his undergraduate degree in Criminal Justice from the University of Phoenix.

Karina Bull, City of Seattle

Karina Bull is the Policy Manager of the City of Seattle Office of Labor Standards (OLS). Karina has worked for the City of Seattle for twelve years, focusing on the development and implementation of laws that advance workplace equity. Previously, Karina worked on employment issues for the Multnomah County Attorney’s Office in Portland; advocated for transportation equity and farm worker rights; and managed non-profit arts education programs for at-risk students and their teachers. Karina is an attorney and graduated from Lewis and Clark School of Law. She earned her undergraduate degrees in English and History from Vanderbilt University.

Matt Capece, United Brotherhood of Carpenters (via teleconference)

Matthew F. Capece, Esq. is a Representative of the General President of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters. He graduated from the University of Connecticut School of Law with a JD and an award in labor-law studies. He has been a specialist in matters involving employer payroll fraud in the construction industry since 1989. His duties include tracking state and federal legislation and law-enforcement cases. Much of his time is spent meeting regularly with policy makers and law enforcement agencies as well as construction workers and employers who have been victimized by payroll fraud practices. He is licensed to practice law in Connecticut.

Lisa Christensen Gee, Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy (ITEP)

Lisa is one of a team of three Senior Analysts at ITEP who work directly with state organizations and lawmakers to provide technical assistance and strategic guidance on state tax policy issues.

Prior to joining ITEP in 2016, Lisa worked as an analyst with the Fiscal Policy Center at Voices for Illinois Children where she focused on state tax and budget policy issues impacting family economic security, education, human services, and health care. In that role she conducted research, authored reports, and created data and communication tools to advance budget and tax reforms that improve opportunities for low- and middle-income families and put Illinois on a path to a stronger fiscal future.

Previously, Lisa worked on a range of social policy issues, including a fair tax campaign with the Sargent Shriver National Center on Poverty Law and family tax credits with the National Women’s Law Center.

David Cooper, Economic Policy Institute / EARN

@metacoop

David Cooper is the Senior Economic Analyst at the Economic Policy Institute. He conducts national and state-level research, with a focus on the minimum wage, wage theft, employment and unemployment, poverty, and wage and income trends. He also coordinates and provides technical support to the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN). David’s analyses on the impact of minimum wage laws have been used by policymakers and advocates in city halls and statehouses across the country, as well as in Congress and the White House. He has testified in many states and cities on the challenges facing low-wage workers and their families, and has been interviewed and cited by numerous local and national media, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, CNBC, and NPR. Cooper received his Bachelor of Arts and Master of Public Policy degrees from Georgetown University.

Dan Crawford, Economic Policy Institute (EPI)

@dpcrawf

Dan Crawford joined EPI in 2013. As the media relations director, Dan helps craft EPI’s external communications, works to promote EPI’s research in the press and on social media, and edits Working Economics, the EPI blog. He is a veteran of President Obama’s 2008 and 2012 campaigns and served at the U.S. Small Business Administration.

Marie Downey, Boston Education, Skills & Training (BEST)

@BESTCorpHTC

Marie Downey’s commitment to hospitality workers is born out of personal experience. A quality job as a food server at a hotel with a strong Labor Management partnership, changed the course of her life. She eventually received her Master’s in Social Work from Boston College and over the next twenty years worked as a social worker for hotel workers. In 2004, she founded BEST with the belief that good training, good jobs, and good benefits create pathways out of poverty. She has served on the Massachusetts Workforce Investment Board, the Massachusetts Workforce Training Fund Advisory Board, and the Massachusetts Apprenticeship Council.

Maurice Emellem, National Employment Law Project

@MEmsellem

Maurice Emsellem is the Director of the Access and Opportunity Program of the National Employment Law Project, a research and advocacy organization that delivers on the nation’s promise of economic opportunity for low-wage and unemployed workers. Mr. Emsellem specializes in government support systems for unemployed workers and the employment rights of people with criminal records.

Dan Essrow, Economic Policy Institute

@djessrow ‏

Dan Essrow joined EPI in the winter of 2012. Dan works with EPI’s experts and communications staff to produce the Institute’s reports and web publications. He designs print, web, and email products, and creates visual communications that are clear, concise, and accessible. He has previously worked as a web producer at Boston University, and contributed graphic design and communications strategy to a 2012 U.S. Senate campaign. Essrow earned his B.A. in Political Science and B.S. in Communication from Boston University.

Petra Falcon, Promise Arizona

@PetraFalcon

Petra Falcon is the Executive Director of Promise Arizona (PAZ). PAZ sets out to unite Latinos and immigrants in Arizona to build influence and shape their communities. The Phoenix-based nonprofit and NCLR Affiliate focuses on job growth, education, and other issues, but they’ve mostly been recognized for engaging potential voters to take action. Registering as many eligible voters as possible is at the center of PAZ’s plan to engage Latinos in Maricopa County.

Adine Forman, Hospitality Training Academy Los Angeles

@LosAngelesHTA

Adine Forman is the Executive Director of the Hospitality Training Academy (HTA), a nonprofit labor-management partnership/Taft-Hartley fund that provides benefits to both employers and the UNITE HERE Local 11 labor union, serving Los Angeles and Orange Counties. The HTA trains and upgrades the skills of thousands of UNITE HERE Local 11 hospitality and food service workers. Adine also serves on both the Los Angeles County and City Workforce Investment Boards (WIBs), Los Angeles Workforce Systems Collaborative, the Liberty Hill Community Funding Board, the City of Santa Monica Cradle to Career Initiative, and the Parent Board of Windward School.

Allan Freyer, North Carolina Justice Center

@Allan Freyer

Allan Freyer is Director of the Workers’ Rights Project at the North Carolina Justice Center. He has over a decade of experience in federal, state, and local economic development policy, including service as a policy advisor to three Members of the United States Congress and as an independent economic development consultant to nonprofits, universities, and state and local government agencies. He has a Bachelor’s in Political Science from Duke University and a Masters and Ph.D. in City & Regional Planning from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

José Garza, Texas Workers Defense Project

José Garza Executive Director of the Workers Defense Project. He is a San Antonio, Texas native who has spent his career fighting for working people, lifting up low-income communities, and protecting immigrants. He began his career practicing law on the border, first as an assistant public defender at Texas RioGrande Legal Aid, Inc. and later as an assistant federal public defender in the Western District of Texas. Most recently, Garza served in the Obama Administration as a senior policy official at the U.S. Department of Labor. In addition to working extensively with groups organizing workers across the country, Jose fought to ensure that working people can join together to improve their working conditions and support their families, regardless of their immigration status.

Terri Gerstein, Open Society Foundations

Terri Gerstein is currently an Open Society Foundation Leadership in Government Fellow, and is working to strengthen state and local enforcement of labor laws. Previously, she worked for over 17 years in New York State government, most recently as Labor Bureau Chief in the New York State Attorney General’s Office. Under her leadership, the Labor Bureau increased criminal prosecutions of employers; collaborated with federal and city agencies on labor standards enforcement; aggressively enforced wage and hour laws in high-violation industries; and sparked reforms in national employers’ policies in relation to on-call shifts, payment of wages by payroll cards, and use of non-compete agreements. Before that, she was a Deputy Commissioner in the New York State Department of Labor, and an Assistant Attorney General and Deputy Section Chief in the Labor Bureau of the New York State Attorney General’s Office. She is a graduate of Harvard Law School and Harvard College.

Angela Glover Blackwell, PolicyLink

@policylink

Angela Glover Blackwell, Chief Executive Officer, started PolicyLink in 1999 and continues to drive its mission of advancing economic and social equity. Under Blackwell’s leadership, PolicyLink has gained national prominence in the movement to use public policy to improve access and opportunity for all low-income people and communities of color, particularly in the areas of health, housing, transportation, and infrastructure.

Prior to founding PolicyLink, Blackwell was Senior Vice President at the Rockefeller Foundation, the founder of the Oakland (CA) Urban Strategies Council, and a partner at Public Advocates, a nationally known public interest law firm.

As a leading voice in the movement for equity in America, Blackwell is a frequent commentator for some of the nation’s top news organizations, including The New York Times, the Huffington Post, The Washington Post, Salon, and CNN, and was most recently published in the Stanford Social Innovation Review. She has appeared regularly on such programs as public radio’s Marketplace, The Tavis Smiley Show, Nightline, and PBS’s Now. Blackwell has also been a guest on the PBS series Moyers & Company and PBS’s NewsHour. She is the co-author of Uncommon Common Ground: Race and America’s Future (W.W. Norton & Co., 2010), and has contributed to What It’s Worth: Strengthening the Financial Future of Families, Communities and the Nation (Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco and CFED, 2015), Worlds Apart: Poverty and Politics in Rural America (Yale University Press, 2014, second edition), and Ending Poverty in America: How to Restore the American Dream (The New Press, 2007), among others. In 2013, Blackwell and PolicyLink collaborated with the Center for American Progress to produce All In Nation: An America that Works for All.

Blackwell serves on numerous boards, including the Children’s Defense Fund, the W. Haywood Burns Institute, the U.S. Water Alliance, and FSG. She also advises the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve as one of 15 members of its Community Advisory Council. Angela earned a bachelor’s degree from Howard University, and a law degree from the University of California, Berkeley.

Sarah Jane Glynn, National Academy of Social Insurance

@SarahJaneGlynn

Sarah Jane Glynn, PhD is a Senior Fellow at the National Academy of Social Insurance. Glynn is an expert in paid family and medical leave, and has studied policy and program implementation at the local, state, and national level, helping to develop paid family and medical leave program implementation plans for Connecticut, Hawaii, and Montgomery County, Maryland. She has testified before state and local governments on paid leave, and has consulted with members of Congress and political candidates on paid leave proposals. Glynn received her bachelor’s degree in Women’s Studies from UCLA and her doctorate in Sociology from Vanderbilt University.

Gayle Goldin, Rhode Island State Senator and FMLI Campaign Adviser

@gaylegoldin @FmlyValuesWork

Gayle Goldin serves as Family Medical Leave Insurance (FMLI) Campaign Advisor to Family Values@Work, a national network of 24 state-based coalitions helping spur the growing movement for family-friendly workplace policies such as paid sick days and family leave insurance. She has co-authored reports and opinion pieces on paid leave. Gayle is also a state senator in Rhode Island. In 2013, she championed the passage of Temporary Caregiver Insurance, making Rhode Island the third state to create paid family leave and the first to do so with job protection. She holds a B.A. from McGill University and an M.A. in public policy from Tufts University.

Kate Hamaji, Center for Popular Democracy

Kate Hamaji is a Research Analyst at the Center for Popular Democracy (CPD). Kate produces research to support a broad range of CPD’s economic and racial justice campaigns. She came to CPD from the New York City Office of Financial Empowerment, where she coordinated programmatic and policy initiatives to build wealth in low-income communities and to hold financial institutions accountable to New Yorkers and their families. Prior to her work in the city, Kate worked with one of CPD’s network members, Make the Road New York, where she helped to connect under and unemployed immigrant New Yorkers to quality training programs and sustainable jobs. She also coordinated Make the Road’s Citizenship Education Program to help members pass the exam to obtain U.S. citizenship. Kate holds a B.A. from the University of California at Los Angeles and an M.P.A. from the NYU Wagner School of Public Service.

Chris Hoene, California Budget & Policy Center

@ChrisWHoene

Chris Hoene is the executive director of the California Budget and Policy Center, a position he has held since October 2012. He has 20 years of leadership in state and local policy research and analysis. Prior to joining the Budget Center, Chris was director of the Center for Research and Innovation at the National League of Cities in Washington, DC. Chris also previously worked for the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities in Washington, DC, and the Public Policy Institute of California in San Francisco. In 2011, in recognition of his service to the state and local community, Chris was elected as a Fellow to the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA).

Andrea Johnson, National Women’s Law Center

@andylynnjo

Andrea Johnson is Senior Counsel for State Policy at the National Women’s Law Center (NWLC). In that role, she coordinates efforts to advance state policies across NWLC’s workplace justice, income security, education, and reproductive rights and health teams, while working directly on legislation and litigation related to pay discrimination, pregnancy discrimination, and unfair scheduling practices. Prior to joining the Center, Andrea was a law clerk for the Honorable Colleen Kollar-Kotelly on the United States District Court for the District of Columbia and the Honorable Eric T. Washington, Chief Judge of the District of Columbia Court of Appeals. Andrea served as a Legislative Aide for Congresswoman Betty McCollum from Minnesota before attending law school. She received a law degree from Columbia Law School and a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science and French from Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota. Andrea is a proud Midwesterner hailing from Mankato, Minnesota.

Janelle Jones, Economic Policy Institute / EARN

@janellecj

Janelle Jones joined the Economic Policy Institute in 2016. She is an economic analyst working on a variety of labor market topics within EPI’s Program on Race, Ethnicity, and the Economy (PREE) and the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN). She was previously a research associate at the Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR), where she worked on topics including racial inequality, unemployment, job quality, and unions. Her research has been cited in The New Yorker, The Economist, Harper’s, The Washington Post, The Review of Black Political Economy, and other publications. She previously worked as an economist at the Bureau of Economic Analysis. Janelle holds a Masters in Applied Economics from Illinois State University and a Bachelor of Science in mathematics from Spelman College.

Adam Kader, Arise Chicago

@AriseChicago

Since 2006, Adam has overseen the training of nearly 4,000 workers, more than 100 employer negotiations, and the recovery of more than $4 million in owed wages and compensation. During his time there, Arise Chicago played a leading role in passing two county ordinances, two city ordinances, and one state law. Adam serves on the Advisory Committee of the Labor Research Action Network and on the Board of Directors of the Raise the Floor Alliance. Before joining Arise Chicago, he worked in community-based adult education. Adam received his master’s degree in Urban Planning & Public Policy from the University of Illinois-Chicago.

Sam Krinsky, New York City Office of Labor Policy and Standards

Sam Krinsky is the first Research Director of the NYC Office of Labor Policy & Standards, where he leads the Office’s program of original research on labor issues in NYC and contributes to its work developing and enforcing city-level laws. Previously, Sam worked as a researcher and policy analyst for health care workers’ unions and still maintains an active research agenda in health economics. He received is M.A. in Economics from NYU and has been published in leading peer-reviewed medical and health services journals.

Lauren Kuby, Tempe City Council

Lauren Kuby was elected to the City Council in Tempe, AZ—her first elected office—on a sustainability platform in 2014. She is a long-time community leader who advocates for worker protections, vulnerable populations, and climate-change action, as well as a recognized national champion for cities as incubators of innovation. Veteran journalist Juan Gonzales recently featured Kuby in his book Reclaiming Gotham, citing her as evidence of a growing movement of cities taking progressive action and challenging legislative preemption. As manager of community engagement for Arizona State University’s (ASU) Global Institute of Sustainability, Kuby champions urban sustainability practices and solutions and brings together the ASU community, local small businesses, nonprofits, and neighborhood organizations to address the three Es: Economy, Equity, and the Environment.  As a councilmember, she has led Tempe’s efforts for equal pay, earned sick days, a living wage, animal protection, urban forestry, government transparency, and campaign-finance reform.  DMO (the Democratic Municipal Officials organization) chose her as one of the country’s top municipal elected officials last year. She earned a B.A. in history from The University of Chicago and an M.A. in public history from ASU.

Gordon Lafer, University of Oregon Labor Education and Research Center

Gordon Lafer joined the Labor Education and Research Center (LERC) faculty in 1997. His work focuses primarily on industrial and policy research, and he has written widely on issues of economic and employment policy. In 2009-10, Lafer was on leave from the University of Oregon serving as Senior Policy Advisor for the U.S. House of Representatives’ Committee on Education and Labor. Lafer teaches extension courses on internal and external organizing, contract negotiations, and labor policy. In 2017, Lafer is leading the launch of the UO Labor Research Colloquium, an interdisciplinary research forum for faculty and graduate students at the university. In 2011, Lafer became a Research Associate of the Economic Policy Institute in Washington, DC, and has published numerous policy reports related to current debates over state and federal economic policy. His most recent book is The One Percent Solution: How Corporations Are Remaking America, One State at a Time (Cornell University Press, 2017). Lafer received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Yale University in 1995.

Thea Mei Lee, Economic Policy Institute

Thea Lee will become president of the Economic Policy Institute on January 1, 2018. She served as deputy chief of staff, policy director and chief international economist at the AFL-CIO from 1997 until June of 2017. Prior to that, she worked as an international trade economist at EPI, and as an editor at Dollars & Sense magazine in Boston. She received a Bachelor’s degree from Smith College and a Master’s degree in economics from the University of Michigan.

Ms. Lee is co-author of A Field Guide to the Global Economy, published by the New Press. Her research projects include reports on the North American Free Trade Agreement, on the impact of international trade on U.S. wage inequality, and on the domestic steel and textile industries.

She has appeared on numerous television and radio shows, including the PBS News Hour; CNN; Good Morning America; NPR’s All Things Considered and Marketplace; and the PBS documentary Commanding Heights. She has testified before several committees of the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate on various economic policy topics.

David Lujan, Arizona Center for Economic Progress

@DavidLujan

Lujan is the Director of the Arizona Center for Economic Progress, a nonprofit organization that advocates for policies to create jobs and grow the Arizona economy. David is an Arizona native who served in the Arizona legislature from 2005 until 2013. He was first elected to the Arizona House of Representatives in 2004, representing most of the central Phoenix area. He served three terms in the House from 2005 until 2011, and one term in the Senate from 2012-2013. He was the House Minority Leader from 2009-2011. While in the House of Representatives, Lujan was the Ranking Democrat on the House Education committee and served on the Appropriations committee. Lujan received many awards while serving in the legislature, including being named Public Official of the Year by the National Association of Social Workers. For most of his time in the legislature, Lujan also held a second elected office, serving as a school board member for the Phoenix Union High School District. Upon becoming Board President, Lujan led efforts to unanimously pass a resolution urging Congress to pass the Dream Act, providing a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrant students. At the time, the Phoenix Union Board was one of the first elected bodies in Arizona to pass such a resolution. Lujan became an Arizona State Senator on January 11, 2012 when he was appointed by the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors to complete the term of Kyrsten Sinema who resigned to run for the United States Congress.

Liz McNichol, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP)

McNichol is a Senior Fellow specializing in state fiscal issues including the economy’s impact on state budgets and long-term structural reform of state budget and tax systems. She also works on related state policy issues including estate taxes, pension funding, and trends in income inequality. McNichol joined CBPP in 1996. She brings many years of experience working on state and local budget and tax issues. Before coming to the Center, she worked for SEIU and was a staff member of the Joint Finance Committee for the State of Wisconsin Legislature specializing in property taxes and state aid to local governments.

Clarissa Martínez-de-Castro, UnidosUS

Clarissa Martínez-de-Castro is the Deputy Vice President of Office of Research, Advocacy, and Legislation for UnidosUS. With UnidosUS, Clarissa oversees the organization’s work on immigration and efforts to expand Latino engagement in civic life and public policy debates. She also served on the board of Demos. Martínez-de-Castro was previously Manager of the Coalition for Comprehensive Immigration Reform, Director of State Advocacy for NCLR, Assistant Director of the California-Mexico Project at the University of Southern California, Public Policy Coordinator for the Southwest Voter Research Institute, an organizer for the Ladies’ Garment Workers Union (now UNITE), and Union Representative for the Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees Union (HERE) Local 11. Martínez-de-Castro earned her Master’s degree in public administration from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and her bachelor’s degree in diplomacy and world affairs at Occidental College.

Matt Morrison, Working America

@WorkingAmerica

Matt Morrison joined Working America in 2008 as the political director, became a deputy director in 2015, then co-executive director in 2017. He leads the organization’s electoral strategy and operations. During his time with Working America, Matt has focused on helping refine the organization’s field and member communications programs through the use of clinical testing and advanced analytics. Prior to joining Working America, Morrison served on John Edwards’ 2008 presidential campaign, in the government affairs department of the American Federation of Teachers, and on Capitol Hill in the office of Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-D.C.). He holds undergraduate and law degrees from Washington University in St. Louis.

Aldo Muirragui, SEIU Local 32BJ

Aldo Muirragui is Research Coordinator at SEIU Local 32BJ, where he directs all research related to the union’s organizing campaigns and representation activities in Florida. Most recently, Aldo has focused his research on Local 32BJ’s airport organizing campaign, with a particular focus on the Miami and Fort Lauderdale International Airports. As the largest union of property services in the U.S., with more than 163,000 members that include cleaners, property maintenance workers, doormen, security officers, food service and airport workers, SEIU Local 32BJ seeks to build and grow a diverse, effective, politically independent and democratic organization of workers to change our lives for the better, improve our communities and build a more just society for present and future generations.

Sam Munger, State Innovation Exchange (SiX)

@stateinnovation

Sam Munger is Senior Advisor and Director of Special Projects at SiX. Sam’s experience includes working for a prominent Democratic polling firm, a national consumer advocacy watchdog, and The Nation magazine, as well as John Kerry’s 2004 Presidential campaign. He was a founding member and head of outreach for the American Legislative and Issue Campaign Exchange (ALICE) and Managing Director of the Center for State Innovation (CSI). He holds a JD from NYU School of Law and clerked for two years in the Southern District of New York.

James Parrott, Center for New York City Affairs (CNYCA) at The New School

@JParrott10007

James Parrott is Director of Economic and Fiscal Policy at the Center for New York City Affairs at The New School. The Center is an applied policy research institute that drives innovation in social policy with a focus on how public policy impacts low-income communities, and in pursuit of a more just and equitable city. Parrott’s current projects include monitoring the implementation of the $15 minimum wage in New York, developing a career ladder for nonprofit human service workers, and working to improve labor protections and social insurance programs. He regularly writes op-eds on New York’s economic and fiscal challenges and has written for The American Prospect. Parrott received his PhD in Economics from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

[pdfpagebreak]

Manuel Pastor, University of Southern California

@Prof_MPastor ‏

Dr. Manuel Pastor is Professor of Sociology and American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California (USC) where he directs the Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) and the Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration (CSII). He is the USC Turpanjian Chair in Civil Society and Social Change, and holds an economics Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Pastor writes and speaks widely on issues including demographic change, economic inequality, community empowerment, environmental justice, and social movements. His recent books include: Unsettled Americans: Metropolitan Context and Civic Leadership for Immigrant Integration, co-edited with John Mollenkopf; and Equity, Growth, and Community: What the Nation Can Learn from America’s Metro Areas, co-authored with Chris Benner. Pastor’s current research culminates in the release of his forthcoming book, State of Resistance: What California’s Dizzying Descent and Remarkable Resurgence Means for America’s Future, in April 2018.

Sanjay Pinto, The Workers Institute at Cornell

Sanjay Pinto is a sociologist based in Brooklyn with a range of interests related to social inequality, social policy, and social movements. His current work focuses largely on understanding labor market inequality and studying and supporting efforts to build power and raise standards for low-wage workers. He has writen about white supremacist groups and hate activity for the Southern Poverty Law Center, and was a researcher for the AFL-CIO’s Center of Strategic Research and SEIU’s building services local in Northern California. With an MSc in Development Studies from the London School of Economics and a PhD in Sociology and Social Policy from Harvard, Sanjay’s academic writing includes work on unions and collective bargaining institutions in the US and other economically advanced countries.

Rebecca Rios, Arizona House of Representatives

@Rios_Rebecca ‏

Rebecca Rios is a fourth generation Arizona native and Democratic politician. She is currently Minority Leader of the Arizona House of Representatives, representing the 27th district. She previously served as Arizona State Senator for District 23 from 2004 to 2010, and served as Minority Whip. Earlier, she was a member of the Arizona House of Representatives from 1994 through 2000. She earned both her Bachelor and Master Degrees from Arizona State University, School of Social Work, and worked 25 years in the Behavioral Health and Non-profit fields in Arizona.

Tomas Robles, Living United for Change in Arizona (LUCHA)

@TomasRobles14

Tomas E. Robles Jr. is the Executive Director of Living United for Change in Arizona (LUCHA), a member-driven organization that has played a key role in the recent movement in Arizona to bring attention to wage inequality and workers’ rights. Tomas became involved in grassroots organizing and activism after Senate Bill 1070, an anti-immigration bill that would have led to racial profiling in Arizona, passed. Since then, Tomas has worked with various organizations on issues such as immigrant and worker rights, Veteran’s issues, and housing discrimination. Tomas is the son of Mexican immigrants, born in Tucson, AZ, and raised in Phoenix, Arizona. He is a veteran of the United States Marine Corps and is a graduate of Arizona State University with a Bachelor of Arts in Transborder studies with an emphasis on immigration policy and the economy.

Liz Rose, Economic Policy Institute

@lizrosej

Elizabeth (Liz) Rose joined EPI in 2013 with 20 years of strategic communications experience in government, Congress, and the nonprofit sector. Rose manages EPI’s media relations, publications, and web teams. Prior to joining EPI, Rose directed media relations and communications for several nonprofit organizations including the American Civil Liberties Union’s Washington legislative office, and NARAL Pro-Choice America. Rose also served as the director of public affairs for the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). Before her tenure at the FCC, Rose was a public affairs officer at the U.S. Department of Labor under Secretary Robert Reich. Rose was also the media relations director for the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum when it opened in 1993, and served as a press secretary on Capitol Hill for Sen. John D. Rockefeller, IV (D-W.Va.) and Rep. Thomas J. Downey (D-N.Y.).

Peter Ruark, Michigan League for Public Policy

Peter Ruark is a Senior Policy Analyst at the Michigan League for Public Policy, which he joined in 2001. He specializes in issues related to wages and workplace fairness, adult skills training, public assistance programs, postsecondary education, corrections, and the cost of making ends meet for families with low incomes.

[pdfpagebreak]

Gabriel Sanchez, UC Berkeley Labor Center

Gabriel Augusto Sanchez is a research and policy associate focused on low-wage work. He has researched topics related to immigration, education, inequality, and urban planning. Prior to joining the Labor Center, Gabriel was a researcher for the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality. He also authored a report, with the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, on affordable housing in Los Angeles’ Historic Filipinotown neighborhood. He received a Master of Arts in sociology at Stanford, and a bachelor’s degree in Asian American studies with a minor in education studies from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Jessica Schieder, Economic Policy Institute / EARN

@Schieder_

Jessica Schieder joined EPI in 2015. As a research assistant, she supports EPI’s economists and researchers in analyzing trends in the labor market. She specializes in research on wage trends, executive compensation, the gender wage gap, and various measures of inequality. She also works with the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN) to provide research support to various state advocacy organizations. Prior to joining EPI, Jessica worked at the Center for Effective Government (formerly OMB Watch) as a revenue and spending policies analyst, where she examined how budget and tax policy decisions impact working families. She holds a bachelor’s in International Political Economy from Georgetown University, where she will complete her Master’s degree in International Development this spring.

Daniel Schneider, University of California Berkeley

Danny Schneider is Assistant Professor of Sociology at UC Berkeley where his teaching and research focus on inequality, the family, and household finances. His current research examines how precarious and unpredictable employment affects worker and family health and wellbeing. He received his A.B. in Public Policy at Brown University and his PhD in Sociology and Social Policy from Princeton University. He was previously a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Postdoctoral Scholar in Health Policy Research at UC Berkeley.

Heidi Shierholz, Economic Policy Institute

@hshierholz

Heidi Shierholz leads EPI’s Perkins Project on Worker Rights and Wages, a policy response team that tracks the Trump administration’s wage and employment policies. She also heads EPI’s efforts to advance a worker-centered policy agenda. Throughout her career, Shierholz has educated policymakers, journalists, and the public about the effects of economic policies on low- and middle-income families. Her research and insights on unemployment insurance, on workers “missing” from the labor force, on income and wealth inequality, on young workers, and on many other topics routinely shape policy proposals and inform economic news coverage. Shierholz was an economist at EPI from 2007 to 2014 and she rejoined EPI in 2017. From 2014 to 2017, she served under the Obama administration as chief economist at the Department of Labor. Prior to joining EPI in 2007, Shierholz was assistant professor of economics at the University of Toronto. Shierholz received her PhD in Economics from the University of Michigan.

Rebecca Smith, National Employment Law Project (NELP)

Rebecca Smith joined NELP in 2000, after nearly 20 years advocating for migrant farm workers in Washington State. At NELP, she has worked with state advocates to modernize state unemployment insurance programs, and to ensure that no matter what the structure of a job – whether it is subcontracted, outsourced, or workers are wrongly called “independent contractors” – companies take responsibility for the workers who build their businesses. She has also worked to apply international human rights laws to help protect immigrant workers in the United States, and with immigrant worker organizing groups to enforce U.S. labor laws. She has testified before Congress and several state legislatures and published on these issues. In 2003, she received the United Farm Workers of America’s Aztec Eagle Award, in addition to the Golden Door Award from Northwest Immigrants’ Rights Project, and special recognition by the Foreign Minister of Mexico for her work on behalf of undocumented workers before the InterAmerican Court of Human Rights. Smith earned her J.D. at University of Washington Law School.

Dianne Stewart, Economic Policy Institute / EARN

@DianneStewartUS

Dianne Stewart leads the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN), a national network of more than 60 state-level policy research and advocacy organizations coordinated by EPI. Prior to joining EPI in 2016, she created Indivisible, a nonprofit dedicated to building public understanding of the importance of coming together through government to address critical challenges in our communities, states, and nation. Stewart also created and led Public Works, a nonprofit charged with building public support for government programs and services across the country. She founded and led the Texas-based Center for Public Policy Priorities, one of the original 10 State Priorities Partnership organizations (coordinated by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities) and an early member of both EARN and the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Kids Count network. Dianne holds a Masters in Social Work and Bachelors of Arts from the University of Texas at Austin.

Tom Steyer, NextGen America

@TomSteyer ‏

Tom Steyer is a business leader and philanthropist who believes we have a moral responsibility to give back and help ensure that every family shares the benefits of economic opportunity, education, and a healthy climate. In 2007, Tom and his wife, Kat Taylor, founded Beneficial State Bank, an Oakland-based nonprofit bank that invests any profits back into the community. Tom also serves as President of NextGen America.

Tom and Kat have pledged to give most of their wealth to charitable causes. They have four children and live in San Francisco.

Elizabeth Tandy Shermer, Loyola University

Elizabeth Tandy Shermer (Ph.D., University of California at Santa Barbara, 2009; B.A. University of Virginia, 2003) is an assistant professor of history at Loyola University Chicago where she teaches courses in twentieth-century United States history, with an emphasis on in the fields of capitalism, business, labor, political ideas and ideologies, regional development, and urbanization. She previously taught at Claremont McKenna College in California. Shermer has written extensively on twentieth-century U.S. political and urban history. She is the author of Sunbelt Capitalism: Phoenix and the Transformation of American Politics (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013), editor of Barry Goldwater and the Remaking of the American Political Landscape (University of Arizona Press, 2013), and co-editor, with Nelson Lichtenstein, of The Right and Labor in America: Politics, Ideology, and Imagination (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012).

Hannah Taube, Oregon Working Families

Hannah Taube is the Interim Executive Director of the Oregon Working Families Party, where she works on both electoral and issue campaigns to help improve the lives of working Oregonians. Oregon WFP has partnered with labor unions and community organizations to pass progressive worker protections including state-wide paid sick time and a higher minimum wage. This past legislative session, Oregon WFP lead the coalition to pass the first state-wide fair scheduling law in the nation. Prior to joining Oregon WFP in 2013, Hannah worked in retail, food service, and hospitality, where she experienced the impacts of unfair scheduling practices firsthand while juggling two part time jobs and pursuing a degree in Sociology at Portland State University.

Marni von Wilpert, Economic Policy Institute

@MarnivonWilpert

Marni von Wilpert is Associate Labor Counsel supporting EPI’s Perkins Project on Worker Rights and Wages, a policy response team tracking the wage and employment policies coming out of the White House, Congress, and the courts. She works closely with EPI Labor Counsel to monitor legislation, regulations, and agency enforcement actions that affect workers’ rights, wages, and working conditions. She also works with the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN) to develop worker-focused policies at the local, state, and national levels. Von Wilpert came to EPI in 2017 from the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), where she was an attorney in the Appellate and Supreme Court Litigation Branch from 2014–2017, and served on detail to the U.S. House of Representatives Education and the Workforce Committee.

Liz Vladeck, Office of Labor Policy & Standards at NYC Department of Consumer Affairs

@L_BCV

Liz Vladeck was appointed Deputy Commissioner and Director of the Office of Labor Policy & Standards at the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs by Mayor Bill de Blasio in August 2016. Previously, she worked within the labor movement for many years as a labor lawyer and union organizer in New York City and in Russia, and served as a Board member of New York City Jobs with Justice.

Saba Waheed, UCLA Labor Center

Saba Waheed is Research Director at the UCLA Labor Center. She has fifteen years of research experience developing projects with strong community participation. With her team at the UCLA Labor Center, she coordinated the first ever study of domestic work employers, launched a study of young people in the service economy, and conducted research on the taxi industry. She has also conducted research in other industries such as garment, nail salon, construction and restaurant industries. Previously she was Research Director at DataCenter, where she worked with community organizations around the country and conducted research on various issues such as housing, transportation, education, and non-profit sustainability. She also helped develop the framework of “research justice,” which aims to address the structural inequities in research. In addition to her research work, Saba is an award-winning radio producer and writer. She co-produces the radio show Re:Work, a storytelling show about work and Flip the Script on KPFK. She co-wrote and co-produced an animated film, I am a #youngworker. She also writes fiction. Saba strongly believes that research and media are powerful tools for community storytelling. She received an MA in Anthropology from Columbia University.

Marilyn Watkins, Economic Opportunity Institute

@eoionline @waworkfam

Marilyn Watkins is Policy Director at the Economic Opportunity Institute in Seattle. She led the successful campaign for paid family and medical leave in Washington state. Her research and advocacy also focus on gender and income inequality and state revenue. She is a Clinical Assistant Professor in Health Services at the University of Washington and on the executive committee of Family Values @ Work. Before joining EOI in 1999, she worked as a historical consultant and taught Pacific Northwest and American women’s history. She earned a B.A. at Harvard and Ph.D. in history at the University of Michigan.

Jon Whiten, New Jersey Policy Perspective

@WhitenJon

Jon Whiten is the Vice President of New Jersey Policy Perspective (NJPP), where he leads the organization’s policy, advocacy, and strategic communications efforts. He’s spent the bulk of the past few years working to make NJPP’s agenda for economic justice and tax fairness an unmistakable part of the state’s policy and political debate in advance of next month’s critical gubernatorial and legislative elections. Jon currently serves on the Communications Advisory Committee of the State Priorities Partnership, on the Advisory Board of New Leaders Council – New Jersey, and on the Communications Committee of the Anti-Poverty Network of New Jersey.

Ben Zipperer, Economic Policy Institute

@ben_zipperer

Ben Zipperer joined the Economic Policy Institute in 2016. His areas of expertise include the minimum wage, inequality, and low-wage labor markets. He has published research in the Industrial and Labor Relations Review and has been quoted in outlets such as The New York Times, The Washington Post, Bloomberg, and the BBC. Prior to joining EPI, Ben was research economist at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth. He is a senior research associate at the Center for Economic and Policy Research and a research associate at the Center on Wage and Employment Dynamics at the University of California, Berkeley. Zipperer earned his B.S. in Mathematics at the University of Georgia, Athens, and his Ph.D. in Economics at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

[/earn-section][earn-section id="attendees-by-state" hide]

Attendees (by state)

Alabama

Arise Citizens’ Policy Project

  • Carol Gundlach

Arkansas

Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families

  • Eleanor Wheeler

Arizona

Arizona Center for Economic Progress

  • David Lujan

Arizona House of Representatives

  • Rebecca Rios

City of Flagstaff

  • Cliff Bryson
  • Eva Putzova

GeoDriven 

  • Joe Bader

Living United for Change in Arizona (LUCHA)

  • Tomas Robles

Promise Arizona

  • Petra Falcon

Tempe City Council

  • Lauren Kuby

California

California Budget & Policy Center

  • Christopher Hoene

California Labor Federation

  • John Brauer

Center on Policy Initiatives

  • Anjleena Sahni

Hospitality Training Academy (HTA)

  • Adine Forman

LAANE- Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy

  • Roy Samaan

Latino Decisions 

  • Matt Barreto

National Employment Law Project

  • Maurice Emsellem

NextGen America

  • Tom Steyer

UC Berkeley 

  • Sylvia Allegretto
  • Danny Schneider
  • Gabriel Augusto Sanchez
  • Sarah Thomason

UC Santa Cruz

  • Chris Benner

UCLA Labor Center

  • Tia Koonse
  • Saba Waheed

USC Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration

  • Vanessa Carter
  • Edward Muña
  • Manuel Pastor

Working Partnerships USA

  • Aboubacat Ndiaye

Colorado

Colorado Center on Law and Policy

  • Claire Levy

Colorado Fiscal Institute

  • Carol Hedges
[pdfpagebreak]

Georgia

Georgia Budget and Policy Institute

  • Wesley Tharpe

Hawaii

Hawaii Appleseed Center for Law and Economic Justice

  • Nicole Woo

Illinois

Arise Chicago

  • Adam Kader

Center for Tax and Budget Accountability

  • Bobby Otter

Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy

  • Lisa Christensen Gee

Loyola University Chicago

  • Elizabeth Tandy Shermer

SEIU Healthcare IL-IN-MO-KS

  • Greg Will

Indiana

Indiana Institute for Working Families

  • Andrew Bradley
  • Erin Macey

Iowa

Iowa Policy Project

  • Peter Fisher

Kentucky

Kentucky Center for Economic Policy

  • Anna Baumann
  • Dustin Pugel
  • Ashley Spalding

Louisiana

Jesuit Social Research Institute

  • Alí Bustamante

Louisiana Budget Project

  • Nick Albares
  • Jan Moller

Maine

Maine Center for Economic Policy

  • Sarah Austin

Maryland

Maryland Center on Economic Policy

  • Shamekka Kuykendall
  • Benjamin Orr

Massachusetts

BEST Hospitality Training

  • Marie Downey

Boston Indicators

  • Luc Schuster

Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center

  • Phineas Baxandall
  • Noah Berger
  • Nicole Rodriguez
  • Jeremy Thompson

Michigan

Michigan League for Public Policy

  • Peter Ruark

Minnesota

Minnesota Budget Project

  • Clark Goldenrod

Montana

Montana Budget & Policy Center

  • Adrienne Bombelles

New Jersey

New Jersey Policy Perspective

  • Brandon McKoy
  • Jon Whiten

New Mexico

New Mexico Voices for Children

  • Gerard Bradley

New York

Center for New York City Affairs

  • James Parrott

Center for Popular Democracy

  • Kate Hamaji

Fiscal Policy Institute

  • David Kallick
  • Cyierra Roldan

Ford Foundation

  • Anna Wadia

National Employment Law Project

  • Maya Pinto

NYC Department of Consumer Affairs, Office of Labor Policy & Standards

  • Samuel Krinsky
  • Liz Vladeck

PolicyLink

  • Angela Glover Blackwell

SEIU Local 32BJ

  • Aldo Muirragui
  • Christopher Pipa

The Rockefeller Foundation

  • Rachel Korberg

The Worker Institute at Cornell University

  • Sanjay Pinto

North Carolina

Center for Responsible Lending

  • Whitney Barkley

North Carolina Justice Center Workers’ Rights Project

  • Allan Freyer

Ohio

Policy Matters Ohio

  • Hannah Halbert
  • Amy Hanauer
  • Wendy Patton
  • Zach Schiller
  • Michael Shields

Oklahoma

Oklahoma Policy Institute

  • Courtney Cullison
  • Gene Perry

Oregon

Oregon Center for Public Policy

  • Janet Bauer
  • Daniel Hauser

Oregon Working Families

  • Hannah Taube

University of Oregon

  • Gordon Lafer

Pennsylvania

Keystone Research Center

  • Stephen Herzenberg
  • Mark Price

Rhode Island

The Economic Progress Institute

  • Douglas Hall

Family Values @ Work

  • Gayle Goldin

Tennessee

National Academy of Social Insurance

  • Sarah Jane Glynn

Texas

Center for Public Policy Priorities

  • Laura Rosen

Workers Defense Project

  • José Garza

Utah

Voices for Utah Children

  • Matthew Weinstein

Vermont

Public Assets Institute

  • Stephanie Yu

Virginia

The Commonwealth Institute for Fiscal Analysis

  • Michael Cassidy

Washington

Economic Opportunity Institute

  • John Burbank
  • Makini Howell
  • Aaron Keating
  • Carolanne Sanders
  • Matthew Streib
  • Marilyn Watkins

National Employment Law Project

  • Rebecca Smith

Seattle Office of Labor Standards

  • Karina Bull

West Virginia

West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy

  • Ted Boettner
  • Caitlin Cook
  • Seth DiStefano
  • Sean O’Leary

Wisconsin

COWS

  • Matthew Braunginn
  • Laura Dresser
  • Joel Rogers
  • Katya Szabados

Kids Forward

  • Tamarine Cornelius

Washington, D.C.

Center for American Progress

  • Rachel West

Center for Economic and Policy Research

  • Alan Barber
  • Brian Dew

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

  • Eric Figueroa
  • Linnea Lassiter
  • Liz McNichol
  • Cortney Sanders

Economic Policy Institute

  • Kayla Blado
  • David Cooper
  • Daniel Crawford
  • Daniel Essrow
  • Janelle Jones
  • Thea Lee
  • Liz Rose
  • Jessica Schieder
  • Eric Shansby
  • Heidi Shierholz
  • Dianne Stewart
  • Marni von Wilpert
  • Ben Zipperer

Georgetown University

  • Zoe Michel

National Employment Law Project

  • Yannet Lathrop

National Women’s Law Center

  • Andrea Johnson
  • Julie Vogtman

Open Society Foundations

  • Terri Gerstein

SiX

  • John Magnino
  • Sam Munger

Teamsters

  • Caitlin Lacy

The Fairness Project

  • Steve Trossman

UnidosUS

  • Clarissa Martínez-de-Castro

Washington Center for Equitable Growth

  • Jessica Fulton

Working America

  • Matt Morrison

[/earn-section][earn-section id="attendees-alphabetical" hide]

Attendees (alphabetical)

Nick Albares
Louisiana Budget Project
nick@labudget.org

Sylvia Allegretto
CWED UC Berkeley
allegretto@berkeley.edu

Sarah Austin
Maine Center for Economic Policy
saustin@mecep.org

Joe Bader
GeoDriven
joebader24@gmail.com

Alan Barber
CEPR
alanbbarber@gmail.com

Whitney Barkley
Center for Responsible Lending
Whitney.Barkley@responsiblelending.org

Matt Barreto
Latino Decisions

Janet Bauer
Oregon Center for Public Policy
jbauer@ocpp.org

Anna Baumann
Kentucky Center for Economic Policy
anna@kypolicy.org

Phineas Baxandall
Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center
pbaxandall@massbudget.org

Chris Benner
Everett Program for Technology and Social Change, UC Santa Cruz
cbenner@ucsc.edu

Noah Berger
Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center
nberger@massbudget.org

Kayla Blado
Economic Policy Institute
kblado@epi.org

Ted Boettner
West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy
tboettner@wvpolicy.org

Adrienne Bombelles
Montana Budget & Policy Center
abombelles@montanabudget.org

Andrew Bradley
Indiana Institute for Working Families
abradley@incap.org

Gerard Bradley
New Mexico Voices for Children
gerardbrad9@gmail.com

John Brauer
California Labor Federation

Matthew Braunginn
COWS
braunginn@cows.org

Cliff Bryson
City of Flagstaff
CBryson@flagstaffaz.gov

Karina Bull
Seattle Office of Labor Standards
karina.bull@seattle.gov

John Burbank
Economic Opportunity Institute
john@eoionline.org

Alí Bustamante
Jesuit Social Research Institute
alirbustamante@gmail.com

Vanessa Carter
USC Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration
vanessa.carter@usc.edu

Michael Cassidy
The Commonwealth Institute for Fiscal Analysis
Michael@thecommonwealthinstitute.org

Lisa Christensen Gee
Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy
lisa@itep.org

Caitlin Cook
West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy
ccook@wvpolicy.org

David Cooper
Economic Policy Institute
dcooper@epi.org

Tamarine Cornelius
Kids Forward
tcornelius@wccf.org

Daniel Crawford
Economic Policy Institute
dcrawford@epi.org

Courtney Cullison
Oklahoma Policy Institute
clcullison@okpolicy.org

Brian Dew
CEPR
dew@cepr.net

Seth DiStefano
West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy
sdistefano@wvpolicy.org

Marie Downey
BEST Hospitality Training
mdowney@besthtc.org

Laura Dresser
COWS
ldresser@cows.org

Maurice Emsellem
National Employment Law Project
emsellem@nelp.org

Daniel Essrow
Economic Policy Institute
dessrow@epi.org

Petra Falcon
Promise Arizona

Eric Figueroa
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
efigueroa@cbpp.org

Peter Fisher
Iowa Policy Project
pfisher@iowapolicyproject.org

Adine Forman
Hospitality Training Academy (HTA)
Adine.Forman@LAHTA.org

Allan Freyer
NC Justice Center
allan@ncjustice.org

Jessica Fulton
Washington Center for Equitable Growth
jfulton@equitablegrowth.org

José Garza
Workers Defense Project
jose@workersdefense.org

Terri Gerstein
Open Society Foundations
terri.gerstein@gmail.com

Angela Glover Blackwell
PolicyLink

Sarah Jane Glynn
National Academy of Social Insurance

Clark Goldenrod
Minnesota Budget Project
cgoldenrod@mnbudgetproject.org

Gayle Goldin
Family Values @ Work
gayle@familyvaluesatwork.org

Carol Gundlach
Arise Citizens’ Policy Project
carol@alarise.org

Hannah Halbert
Policy Matters Ohio
HHalbert@policymattersohio.org

Doug Hall
Economic Progress Institute
dhall@economicprogressri.org

Kate Hamaji
Center for Popular Democracy
khamaji@populardemocracy.org

Amy Hanauer
Policy Matters Ohio
Ahanauer@policymattersohio.org

Daniel Hauser
Oregon Center for Public Policy
dhauser@ocpp.org

Carol Hedges
Colorado Fiscal Institute
hedges@coloradofiscal.org

Stephen Herzenberg
Keystone Research Center
herzenberg@keystoneresearch.org

Christopher Hoene
California Budget & Policy Center
choene@calbudgetcenter.org

Makini Howell
Economic Opportunity Institute
makini@plumbistro.com

Andrea Johnson
National Women’s Law Center
ajohnson@nwlc.org

Janelle Jones
Economic Policy Institute
jjones@epi.org

Adam Kader
Arise Chicago
adam@arisechicago.org

David Kallick
Fiscal Policy Institute
ddkallick@fiscalpolicy.org

Aaron Keating
Economic Opportunity Institute
aaron@eoionline.org

Tia Koonse
UCLA Labor Center
tia.koonse@ucla.edu

Rachel Korberg
The Rockefeller Foundation

Sam Krinsky
NYC Office of Labor Policy and Standards
skrinsky@dca.nyc.gov

Lauren Kuby
Tempe City Council
Lauren_Kuby@tempe.gov

Shamekka Kuykendall
Maryland Center on Economic Policy
SKuykendall@mdeconomy.org

Caitlin Lacy
Teamsters
clacy@teamster.org

Gordon Lafer
University of Oregon

Linnea Lassiter
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
llassiter@cbpp.org

Yannet Lathrop
National Employment Law Project
ylathrop@nelp.org

Thea Lee
Economic Policy Institute

Claire Levy
Colorado Center on Law and Policy
clevy@cclponline.org

David Lujan
Arizona Center for Economic Progress
DLujan@AzEconCenter.org

Erin Macey
Indiana Institute for Working Families
emacey@incap.org

Clarissa Martínez-de-Castro
UnidosUS

Brandon McKoy
New Jersey Policy Perspective
mckoy@njpp.org

Liz McNichol
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
mcnichol@cbpp.org

John Magnino
SiX
john@stateinnovation.org

Zoe Michel
Georgetown University
zoeziliak@gmail.com

Jan Moller
Louisiana Budget Project
jan@labudget.org

Matt Morrison
Working America
mmorrison@workingamerica.org

Aldo Muirragui
SEIU 32BJ
AMuirragui@seiu32bj.org

Edward Muña
USC Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration
muna@usc.edu

Sam Munger
SiX
sam@stateinnovation.org

Aboubacat Ndiaye
Working Partnerships USA
asn@wpusa.org

Sean O’Leary
West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy
soleary@wvpolicy.org

Benjamin Orr
Maryland Center on Economic Policy
borr@mdeconomy.org

Bobby Otter
Center for Tax and Budget Accountability
botter@ctbaonline.org

James Parrott
Center for New York City Affairs

Manuel Pastor
USC Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration
mpastor@usc.edu

Wendy Patton
Policy Matters Ohio
WPatton@policymattersohio.org

Gene Perry
Oklahoma Policy Institute
gperry@okpolicy.org

Maya Pinto
National Employment Law Project
mpinto@nelp.org

Sanjay Pinto
Worker Institute at Cornell

Christopher Pipa
SEIU Local 32BJ
cpipa@seiu32bj.org

Mark Price
Keystone Research Center
price@keystoneresearch.org

Dustin Pugel
Kentucky Center for Economic Policy
dustin@kypolicy.org

Eva Putzova
City of Flagstaff
eputzova@flagstaffaz.gov

Rebecca Rios
Arizona House of Representatives

Tomas Robles
Living United for Change in Arizona (LUCHA)
tomas@luchaaz.org

Nicole Rodriguez
Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center
nrodriguez@massbudget.org

Joel Rogers
COWS

Cyierra Roldan
Fiscal Policy Institute
roldan@fiscalpolicy.org

Liz Rose
Economic Policy Institute
lrose@epi.org

Laura Rosen
CPPP
rosen@cppp.org

Peter Ruark
Michigan League for Public Policy
pruark@MLPP.org

Anjleena Sahni
Center on Policy Initiatives
asahni@onlinecpi.org

Roy Samaan
Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy (LAANE)
rsamaan@laane.org

Gabriel Augusto Sanchez
UC Berkeley Labor Center
gabrielsanchez@berkeley.edu

Carolanne Sanders
Economic Opportunity Institute
carolanne@eoionline.org

Cortney Sanders
CBPP
csanders@cbpp.org

Jessica Schieder
Economic Policy Institute
jschieder@epi.org

Zach Schiller
Policy Matters Ohio
ZSchiller@policymattersohio.org

Danny Schneider
UC Berkeley
djschneider@berkeley.edu

Luc Schuster
Boston Indicators
luc.schuster@bostonindicators.org

Eric Shansby
Economic Policy Institute
eshansby@epi.org

Elizabeth Tandy Shermer
Loyola University Chicago

Michael Shields
Policy Matters Ohio
MShields@policymattersohio.org

Heidi Shierholz
Economic Policy Institute
hshierholz@epi.org

Rebecca Smith
NELP
rsmith@nelp.org

Ashley Spalding
Kentucky Center for Economic Policy
aspalding@kypolicy.org

Dianne Stewart
Economic Policy Institute / EARN
dstewart@epi.org

Tom Steyer
NextGen America
dave.bloom@nextgenamerica.org

Matthew Streib
Economic Opportunity Institute
matthew@eoionline.org

Katya Szabados
COWS
knszabados@cows.org

Hannah Taube
Oregon Working Families
htaube@workingfamilies.org

Wesley Tharpe
Georgia Budget & Policy Institute
wtharpe@gbpi.org

Sarah Thomason
Center for Labor Research and Education
sarahthomason@berkeley.edu

Jeremy Thompson
Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center
jthompson@massbudget.org

Steve Trossman
The Fairness Project
steve@thefairnessproject.org

Liz Vladeck
NYC Department of Consumer Affairs, Office of Labor Policy & Standards
lvladeck@dca.nyc.gov

Julie Vogtman
National Women’s Law Center
jvogtman@nwlc.org

Marni von Wilpert
Economic Policy Institute
mvonwilpert@epi.org

Anna Wadia
Ford Foundation

Saba Waheed
UCLA Labor Center
swaheed@ucla.edu

Marilyn Watkins
Economic Opportunity Institute
marilyn@eoionline.org

Matthew Weinstein
Voices for Utah Children
matthew@utahchildren.org

Rachel West
Center for American Progress
rwest@americanprogress.org

Eleanor Wheeler
AACF
ewheeler@aradvocates.org

Jon Whiten
New Jersey Policy Perspective
whiten@njpp.org

Greg Will
SEIU Healthcare IL-IN-MO-KS
Greg.will@seiuhcil.org

Nicole Woo
Hawaii Appleseed Center for Law and Economic Justice
nicole@hiappleseed.org

Stephanie Yu
Public Assets Institute
steph@publicassets.org

Ben Zipperer
Economic Policy Institute
bzipperer@epi.org

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Notes

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