Jobs and Unemployment

Section 4. Benefit duration: Expand UI benefit duration to provide longer protection during normal times and use better measures of labor market distress to automatically extend and sustain benefits during downturns

 
 

Key proposals

  • Duration of standard benefits: Provide longer protection for unemployed workers during normal economic times by setting the minimum duration of potential benefits at 30 weeks during periods of low unemployment.
  • Duration of extended benefits: Respond faster and more uniformly to growing labor market distress by using federal and state unemployment rates and changes in unemployment rates to automatically and rapidly trigger on extended benefits when the economy is deteriorating (when the unemployment rate reaches 5% or is 1.3 times the minimum unemployment rate in the previous year). Enhance the economy-stabilizing effects of extended benefits by lengthening duration as the labor market worsens, to as many as 99 weeks (when the unemployment rate reaches 10% or 3.2 times the initial minimum unemployment rate).
  • Phased reductions of extended benefits: Support still-struggling groups of workers and stabilize state economies by eliminating “look-back” provisions that allow extended benefits to trigger off while the labor market remains weak (when unemployment is stabilizing at an elevated level or falling only because people have given up actively searching for work). Instead, sustain benefits until unemployment rates are declining and the declines are driven by rising employment (as indicated by a 0.2% reduction in the share of the state’s 25- to 54-year-olds with a job, i.e., the prime-age employment-to-population (EPOP) ratio (see Table 4.1 for the full set of on- and off-triggers).
  • Federal data enhancements: Acknowledge the workers who tend to be left behind in recoveries with more targeted data. Require the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to develop state-level measures of prime-age employment rates that are reliable enough to use as UI off-triggers. Also require the BLS and the Department of Labor Office of Employment and Training Administration (U.S. DOL ETA) to analyze flows of workers out of UI recipiency and into paid employment by demographic and labor market characteristic to ensure that benefit extensions under future reforms do not trigger off when the overall labor market improves but it is actually just more-credentialed workers who are benefiting.

Introduction

The problem

The maximum length of time for which eligible workers can receive unemployment insurance benefits is too short in many states in normal times, grows too slowly and too little under automatic expansions during times of economic distress, is often prematurely cut short, and reinforces existing damaging disparities in the labor market by race.

Currently, it is up to state legislators to set the “potential benefit duration” (PBD) for the standard UI programs in their state. The current UI system does not provide benefits that last long enough to alleviate economic insecurity and enable workers to secure well-matched reemployment during normal economic times, largely because the standard number of weeks provided by most states—26—is well below international norms, and because a growing number of states provide even fewer weeks of eligibility.

Further, during times of labor market distress caused by negative economic shocks, potential benefit duration is not responsive enough to economic conditions. The automatic triggers that extend additional weeks of benefits to workers in high-unemployment states under the permanent Extended Benefits (EB) program have glaring flaws. Those flaws—explained below—have prompted Congresses in past recessions to enact ad hoc emergency programs to provide additional federal UI benefits. For example, over the Great Recession and through 2013, roughly 8.5 times as many weekly claimants received benefits from the Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) program enacted by Congress in 2008 than from the EB program.1

The weakening of social insurance stemming from the shrinkage of potential benefit duration in some states in normal economic times and the failure to always maintain extended PBDs during periods of macroeconomic distress is apparent. UI is meant as wage replacement during periods of joblessness, but unemployed workers who receive fewer weeks of benefits have a smaller share of wages replaced by UI benefits and are under greater pressure to accept alternative work that is not a good fit for their skills and preferences.2 Further, cuts in weeks of benefits are highly likely to disproportionately harm workers with job search barriers like a lack of formal credentials or systemic discrimination based on race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, or other factors. These workers—and others who have a smaller cushion of savings for emergencies—rely on the social insurance function of UI the most, and shrinking PBDs disproportionately harm them.3 Short benefit duration particularly harms workers of color, as structural racism in labor markets leads to their suffering long durations of unemployment on average (BLS 2021). The limited duration of UI benefits keeps the UI system from being fully effective, not only in alleviating economic insecurity during downturns but also in providing a needed boost to the overall economy: Extending unemployment insurance to workers who then spend that money on necessities in the economy is one of the most prominent ways the federal government can combat macroeconomic contraction, and current policy prevents this tool from being used effectively.

The solution

A small number of straightforward policy reforms can significantly address the problems with potential benefit duration in the current UI system. We propose policy reforms to shore up the baseline level of PBD during normal times, make PBDs adjust rapidly and predictably—without relying on ad hoc actions by Congress—during periods of labor market distress, and ramp down gradually as key economic benchmarks are hit. Federal law should guarantee universal minimum benefit duration, as we now detail.

Implementation

Federal standards should be implemented to ensure that all states follow the processes for determining benefit duration outlined in this chapter.

Setting potential benefit duration in normal economic times

Unemployment insurance is a hybrid federal–state program. During normal times when the labor market is not distressed, states finance the regular UI system and state legislatures decide the potential benefit duration for their state. For decades following the enactment of the UI system, all states followed a norm that the minimum PBD should be 26 weeks. Before the Great Recession of 2008, for example, all states had PBDs of least 26 weeks.

However, since then, many states have weakened this standard. Before the COVID-19 economic shock hit the U.S. in March 2020, 10 states had reduced PBDs in their normal UI programs to less than 26 weeks (Whittaker and Isaacs 2019; Evermore 2020).4 Additionally, even after the COVID-19 shock prompted some states to restore some weeks of benefits, bills were introduced in a handful of states to reduce PBDs, and one appears headed for the governor’s signature (Golshan and Delaney 2021; Styf 2021).5 Reductions in normal PBD take needed assistance away from families while they are still struggling, as well as undermining the system’s macroeconomic stabilization goals in times of crisis.

Context: How low baseline levels of benefit duration weaken the economic stabilizing capacity of the standard UI program

When the economy contracts and people are no longer working, their earnings losses translate directly into spending declines, leading to further contraction. UI benefits kick in during these periods of macroeconomic contraction and offset some of that lost spending, helping to stabilize the economy. Low baseline levels of state PBDs hurt the macroeconomic stabilization function of the UI system in at least three ways. First, even during steep and long recessions, the majority of unemployed workers are getting UI benefits through standard programs, not extended benefits programs (including both the regular EB program and the ad hoc emergency programs).6 If the PBDs of these normal programs are shortened, it makes UI less effective as an automatic stabilizer. This is particularly true early in recessions, before any extended or emergency benefit programs have a chance to kick in.

Second, the states with reduced PBDs during normal times are also states with notably low recipiency rates, and these low baseline levels combined with their potential to discourage workers from applying mean there is less UI benefit spending stabilizing the economy.7 (Short PBDs might help convince unemployed workers that it is not worth the potential hassles of navigating the UI system.)8

Third, in the current system, the generosity of federal financing for extended benefits is determined in part by the state’s PBD of normal UI benefits, and this is often the case as well with the ad hoc emergency benefit increases financed during recent recessions. Reducing normal PBDs can hence reduce states’ availability to receive federal financing for extended benefits, or can reduce the amount they receive.

Policy proposal: Set a minimum potential benefit duration of 30 weeks during normal economic times

Before the COVID-19 shock, the state with the longest PBD was Massachusetts, which provided 30 weeks of benefits. Given that 30 weeks obviously provides longer protection for laid-off workers, and given that there is little to no evidence that the longer PBD in Massachusetts did any harm to their labor market or state economy, we suggest that the current gold standard among U.S. states set the new benchmark for a reformed UI system.

It is perhaps useful to note that a 30-week minimum would still leave the benefits available in the United States among the shortest in the developed world. Figure 4A shows the maximum PBD across a wide range of U.S. peer countries.

Social scientists agree that 26 weeks is too short to effectively serve UI’s basic purposes. Outside recessions, 2 million individuals on average collect some UI benefits in a given week. Of these, between 200,000 and 300,000 individuals will exhaust their available UI benefits each month (von Wachter 2019).

Figure A

U.S. workers get fewer months of unemployment benefits than workers in other developed countries: Months of maximum potential benefit duration (PBD) of UI benefits in select OECD countries, 2019

Country Max potential benefit duration, months
Iceland 30
Denmark 24
France 24
Italy 24
Netherlands 24
Norway 24
Portugal 24
Spain 24
Finland 18.5
Switzerland 18.4
Sweden 13.8
Estonia 12
Germany 12
Greece 12
Luxembourg 12
Canada 10.4
Turkey 10
Austria 9
Ireland 9
Japan 9
Lithuania 9
Slovenia 9
Latvia 8
Israel 6.4
United Kingdom 6
United States 5.9
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The data below can be saved or copied directly into Excel.

Note: The original OECD chart compared Michigan with the selected countries. This analysis replaced Michigan with the U.S. national median maximum potential benefit duration of 5.9 months. Canadian data reflect UI PBDs in the province of Ontario.

Source: Authors' analysis of OECD 2021 data.

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Setting potential benefit duration during downturns

The existing “automatic” system for increasing the number of weeks that unemployed workers can receive UI benefits during economic downturns has triggers that are deeply flawed. The Extended Benefits program triggers are not responsive enough, do not trigger benefits early enough during downturns, and “trigger off” extended benefits too soon. Again, by making benefits too brief, these flaws deepen family hardship and worsen recessions.

Broken Extended Benefits program depletes retirement, damages credit, and harms mental health, Donalyn Manion, Kansas

“I am 55 years old, single and unemployed. I have 35 years experience in graphic design and art direction. The last seven years I worked full time as a professor. But in May 2020 the college closed down the program. I also lost income from my freelance work designing posters for live entertainment.

[Congress was slow to pass a benefit extension at the end of last year and] Kansas completely stopped paying benefits on December 27. I have tried to get food and rent assistance but I don’t qualify. So I have had to spend my savings and take out retirement with penalties. My credit has been damaged. If the FPUC payments hadn’t stopped, this wouldn’t have happened. Mentally, I am not the same, but I have no insurance to get help for anxiety. Without savings, there is no way I could afford to relocate for another job. Going through this crisis has opened my eyes. This is a broken system and doesn’t help the people it needs to help. I hope this administration can fix UI. It’s too late to help us—we’ve already lost everything. But we can avoid a crisis down the road.”

Context: How the current Extended Benefits program works

Under the Extended Benefits program, if an economic shock causes a state’s labor market to deteriorate to certain low benchmarks, the federal government funds (but the states will administer) additional weeks of benefits to workers who have exhausted their regular benefits. By establishing benchmarks that trigger extended benefits, past Congresses acknowledged that UI benefits should automatically last longer during labor market downturns. But as explained below, the precise design of the existing EB program often renders these triggers far less useful than they should be.

First, a note about financing. Under permanent law, the EB program is financed 50% by the federal government, though in an ad hoc way during recessions, Congress has usually amended federal law to provide for 100% federal funding of EB.

The total number of additional weeks typically ranges from 13 to 20 weeks, depending on state laws and state unemployment rates. Specifically, the EB program provides two tiers of extended PBDs: tier 1 adds 13 weeks and tier 2 adds an additional seven weeks. The mandatory triggers for tier 1 are based on the level and/or the change in the insured unemployment rate (IUR)—a measure of the share of people in the labor force who are receiving UI benefits. Obviously, this measure can vary not only by labor market conditions but also based on state-level eligibility criteria, as states with stricter eligibility criteria would have lower IUR rates, all else being equal. As will be explained in more detail below, the IUR is a deeply flawed measure of labor market distress that should be replaced with a trigger that is a much more focused measure of labor market distress: the official unemployment rate, a measure that includes workers who are unemployed but not receiving UI benefits. States can also opt to use an additional EB trigger that is based on the standard unemployment rate. Currently, more than half (27) of the states use only the IUR-based trigger for their EB program.9

Figure 4B illustrates that the existing base EB triggers fail to adequately extend benefits during the onset of recessions, and they cut extended benefits off far too soon to ensure support for jobless workers and an expedited recovery. It shows the share of UI recipients that were on standard UI, EB programs, and the discretionary programs (for example, the Emergency Unemployment Compensation or EUC program enacted by Congress during the Great Recession). It is particularly evident that in the wake of the Great Recession, EB programs did far less work in providing benefits to unemployed workers than the discretionary EUC program. Clearly, the existing triggers in UI need fixing to make sure the system is as responsive to downturns as it should be.

Figure 4B

During downturns, unemployed workers in the US still rely the most on standard unemployment insurance (UI) benefits: Number of UI recipients by the UI program delivering their benefits, 1986–2021

Date Standard Extended Benefit (EB) Discretionary (TEUC, EUC, PEUC)
1986-01-04 56,334 11 0
1986-01-11 64,452 17 0
1986-01-18 107,456 34 0
1986-01-25 265,389 79 0
1986-02-01 884,806 122 0
1986-02-08 2,970,703 10,865 0
1986-02-15 3,195,441 20,855 0
1986-02-22 3,334,068 29,327 0
1986-03-01 3,236,535 23,404 0
1986-03-08 3,181,754 22,571 0
1986-03-15 3,146,753 21,226 0
1986-03-22 3,039,135 22,609 0
1986-03-29 2,886,872 21,555 0
1986-04-05 3,392,959 24,368 0
1986-04-12 2,820,565 19,881 0
1986-04-19 2,728,266 23,152 0
1986-04-26 2,555,217 20,565 0
1986-05-03 2,459,207 22,024 0
1986-05-10 2,876,530 19,157 0
1986-05-17 2,482,424 20,926 0
1986-05-24 2,298,043 20,357 0
1986-05-31 2,481,523 32,380 0
1986-06-07 2,445,075 46,951 0
1986-06-14 2,451,805 40,382 0
1986-06-21 2,405,975 44,319 0
1986-06-28 2,309,236 39,333 0
1986-07-05 2,622,403 42,375 0
1986-07-12 2,632,168 39,183 0
1986-07-19 2,562,822 37,564 0
1986-07-26 2,548,066 35,358 0
1986-08-02 2,520,708 35,144 0
1986-08-09 2,555,663 34,807 0
1986-08-16 2,486,575 33,661 0
1986-08-23 2,444,657 28,936 0
1986-08-30 2,288,671 25,600 0
1986-09-06 2,428,717 26,943 0
1986-09-13 2,284,906 26,281 0
1986-09-20 2,250,841 25,727 0
1986-09-27 2,102,228 26,246 0
1986-10-04 2,227,673 29,523 0
1986-10-11 2,587,775 28,977 0
1986-10-18 2,314,662 33,190 0
1986-10-25 2,265,450 33,827 0
1986-11-01 2,247,434 34,588 0
1986-11-08 2,210,782 35,613 0
1986-11-15 2,473,302 37,154 0
1986-11-22 2,141,356 34,341 0
1986-11-29 2,798,901 43,733 0
1986-12-06 2,620,225 41,289 0
1986-12-13 2,698,832 40,107 0
1986-12-20 2,416,744 34,271 0
1986-12-27 2,864,651 33,782 0
1987-01-03 3,488,880 36,261 0
1987-01-10 3,247,854 30,993 0
1987-01-17 3,077,999 30,111 0
1987-01-24 3,201,113 29,946 0
1987-01-31 3,219,550 28,775 0
1987-02-07 3,097,047 28,717 0
1987-02-14 3,058,871 28,040 0
1987-02-21 3,161,801 29,876 0
1987-02-28 3,125,863 33,350 0
1987-03-07 3,015,159 33,060 0
1987-03-14 2,550,618 30,896 0
1987-03-21 2,829,222 31,422 0
1987-03-28 2,791,749 16,248 0
1987-04-04 2,746,354 15,336 0
1987-04-11 2,597,441 17,716 0
1987-04-18 2,534,525 13,251 0
1987-04-25 2,456,167 16,500 0
1987-05-02 2,252,865 12,750 0
1987-05-09 2,283,212 14,278 0
1987-05-16 2,221,302 12,271 0
1987-05-23 2,061,737 13,425 0
1987-05-30 2,191,244 10,367 0
1987-06-06 2,081,118 9,906 0
1987-06-13 2,110,375 10,336 0
1987-06-20 2,072,351 6,298 0
1987-06-27 1,742,329 4,659 0
1987-07-04 1,769,616 4,240 0
1987-07-11 1,893,010 4,424 0
1987-07-18 1,882,050 4,075 0
1987-07-25 2,197,202 5,098 0
1987-08-01 2,183,331 4,625 0
1987-08-08 2,144,856 4,850 0
1987-08-15 2,059,186 4,655 0
1987-08-22 2,014,970 4,795 0
1987-08-29 1,935,627 4,734 0
1987-09-05 1,781,287 3,725 0
1987-09-12 1,881,721 3,821 0
1987-09-19 1,958,742 3,445 0
1987-09-26 1,750,891 3,106 0
1987-10-03 1,727,965 3,026 0
1987-10-10 1,649,746 2,795 0
1987-10-17 1,759,362 2,947 0
1987-10-24 1,629,430 3,026 0
1987-10-31 1,644,292 3,263 0
1987-11-07 1,710,701 2,719 0
1987-11-14 1,958,225 3,094 0
1987-11-21 1,734,386 2,777 0
1987-11-28 2,197,964 3,205 0
1987-12-05 2,102,734 2,874 0
1987-12-12 2,188,244 3,092 0
1987-12-19 2,070,628 2,480 0
1987-12-26 2,341,270 767 0
1988-01-02 2,792,918 2,267 0
1988-01-09 2,900,831 3,155 0
1988-01-16 2,749,752 2,378 0
1988-01-23 2,841,789 1,215 0
1988-01-30 2,690,551 2,681 0
1988-02-06 2,726,017 5,821 0
1988-02-13 2,707,589 3,815 0
1988-02-20 2,689,199 6,994 0
1988-02-27 2,713,027 5,448 0
1988-03-05 2,671,144 6,991 0
1988-03-12 2,614,276 4,482 0
1988-03-19 2,513,500 6,789 0
1988-03-26 2,430,400 4,605 0
1988-04-02 2,339,342 5,891 0
1988-04-09 2,309,223 4,442 0
1988-04-16 2,221,417 10,398 0
1988-04-23 2,127,697 3,266 0
1988-04-30 2,067,926 5,071 0
1988-05-07 2,006,888 3,996 0
1988-05-14 1,997,990 3,568 0
1988-05-21 1,933,880 4,812 0
1988-05-28 1,845,420 4,470 0
1988-06-04 1,920,740 4,308 0
1988-06-11 1,895,836 4,636 0
1988-06-18 1,869,715 3,897 0
1988-06-25 1,877,008 4,819 0
1988-07-02 1,804,967 2,229 0
1988-07-09 2,078,793 2,598 0
1988-07-16 2,067,250 1,885 0
1988-07-23 2,022,325 1,436 0
1988-07-30 2,053,357 1,145 0
1988-08-06 2,006,588 872 0
1988-08-13 1,950,844 806 0
1988-08-20 1,900,521 773 0
1988-08-27 1,880,409 761 0
1988-09-03 1,733,512 622 0
1988-09-10 1,822,221 828 0
1988-09-17 1,736,767 717 0
1988-09-24 1,703,807 836 0
1988-10-01 1,643,878 772 0
1988-10-08 1,591,047 861 0
1988-10-15 1,715,514 798 0
1988-10-22 1,668,017 906 0
1988-10-29 1,760,877 811 0
1988-11-05 1,575,252 534 0
1988-11-12 1,893,295 893 0
1988-11-19 1,626,728 843 0
1988-11-26 2,150,952 847 0
1988-12-03 2,003,960 985 0
1988-12-10 2,092,766 812 0
1988-12-17 2,099,308 976 0
1988-12-24 2,111,102 661 0
1988-12-31 2,513,503 928 0
1989-01-07 2,749,390 983 0
1989-01-14 2,597,973 1,014 0
1989-01-21 2,703,180 1,031 0
1989-01-28 2,641,447 1,080 0
1989-02-04 2,612,079 913 0
1989-02-11 2,689,327 981 0
1989-02-18 2,617,055 966 0
1989-02-25 2,774,563 1,206 0
1989-03-04 2,650,523 3,251 0
1989-03-11 2,674,857 2,079 0
1989-03-18 2,537,473 3,745 0
1989-03-25 2,537,758 2,576 0
1989-04-01 2,409,393 4,104 0
1989-04-08 2,316,981 2,753 0
1989-04-15 2,272,105 4,257 0
1989-04-22 2,169,834 3,354 0
1989-04-29 2,078,626 3,901 0
1989-05-06 2,027,407 2,710 0
1989-05-13 2,076,986 3,239 0
1989-05-20 1,939,695 2,934 0
1989-05-27 1,836,647 1,127 0
1989-06-03 1,985,256 2,476 0
1989-06-10 1,927,756 1,133 0
1989-06-17 1,929,682 2,167 0
1989-06-24 1,964,701 2,058 0
1989-07-01 1,825,033 3,283 0
1989-07-08 2,228,246 1,433 0
1989-07-15 2,221,283 1,306 0
1989-07-22 2,092,853 1,073 0
1989-07-29 2,108,360 1,233 0
1989-08-05 2,140,576 840 0
1989-08-12 2,082,757 1,357 0
1989-08-19 1,996,135 1,309 0
1989-08-26 1,978,439 1,313 0
1989-09-02 1,809,418 1,026 0
1989-09-09 1,962,448 1,414 0
1989-09-16 1,795,287 823 0
1989-09-23 1,867,430 1,618 0
1989-09-30 1,791,583 1,011 0
1989-10-07 1,792,312 1,224 0
1989-10-14 1,940,501 1,435 0
1989-10-21 1,915,145 1,166 0
1989-10-28 1,953,645 842 0
1989-11-04 1,875,344 551 0
1989-11-11 2,116,319 1,512 0
1989-11-18 1,858,546 1,015 0
1989-11-25 2,420,959 1,517 0
1989-12-02 2,284,936 1,603 0
1989-12-09 2,325,995 1,260 0
1989-12-16 2,364,502 1,709 0
1989-12-23 2,439,781 1,277 0
1989-12-30 2,879,093 1,606 0
1990-01-06 3,149,108 2,033 0
1990-01-13 2,920,254 1,660 0
1990-01-20 3,174,376 1,531 0
1990-01-27 2,935,984 1,480 0
1990-02-03 2,976,714 269 0
1990-02-10 2,926,842 1,390 0
1990-02-17 2,962,769 1,128 0
1990-02-24 2,988,729 1,520 0
1990-03-03 3,009,765 2,941 0
1990-03-10 2,881,396 2,346 0
1990-03-17 2,891,191 3,722 0
1990-03-24 2,745,916 2,715 0
1990-03-31 2,717,887 4,309 0
1990-04-07 2,545,571 3,952 0
1990-04-14 2,638,392 5,451 0
1990-04-21 2,471,656 5,124 0
1990-04-28 2,445,432 5,590 0
1990-05-05 2,306,807 5,885 0
1990-05-12 2,311,810 6,032 0
1990-05-19 2,235,076 7,239 0
1990-05-26 2,176,795 6,534 0
1990-06-02 2,255,639 7,819 0
1990-06-09 2,237,820 5,701 0
1990-06-16 2,204,744 7,361 0
1990-06-23 2,219,197 6,745 0
1990-06-30 2,125,194 7,403 0
1990-07-07 2,486,229 3,922 0
1990-07-14 2,521,039 3,218 0
1990-07-21 2,373,921 2,018 0
1990-07-28 2,374,505 2,095 0
1990-08-04 2,361,259 1,896 0
1990-08-11 2,349,505 2,170 0
1990-08-18 2,314,424 1,751 0
1990-08-25 2,301,964 1,977 0
1990-09-01 2,132,684 1,543 0
1990-09-08 2,289,520 2,118 0
1990-09-15 2,164,732 1,998 0
1990-09-22 2,141,334 2,351 0
1990-09-29 2,141,917 1,848 0
1990-10-06 2,071,449 2,046 0
1990-10-13 2,297,912 1,991 0
1990-10-20 2,297,939 2,061 0
1990-10-27 2,388,591 1,870 0
1990-11-03 2,418,015 1,774 0
1990-11-10 2,467,573 1,487 0
1990-11-17 2,425,968 7,309 0
1990-11-24 3,066,071 13,081 0
1990-12-01 2,974,745 20,859 0
1990-12-08 3,044,040 10,140 0
1990-12-15 3,103,399 13,401 0
1990-12-22 2,954,688 7,584 0
1990-12-29 3,540,590 6,415 0
1991-01-05 4,109,522 12,125 0
1991-01-12 4,007,410 10,091 0
1991-01-19 3,802,047 6,341 0
1991-01-26 3,988,936 6,266 0
1991-02-02 4,066,890 5,955 0
1991-02-09 4,008,530 5,733 0
1991-02-16 4,085,427 9,592 0
1991-02-23 4,186,163 14,819 0
1991-03-02 4,232,871 19,648 0
1991-03-09 4,133,414 24,427 0
1991-03-16 4,179,854 25,014 0
1991-03-23 3,972,433 33,163 0
1991-03-30 4,031,933 40,739 0
1991-04-06 3,817,018 81,040 0
1991-04-13 3,792,871 94,953 0
1991-04-20 3,634,909 111,824 0
1991-04-27 3,547,763 100,938 0
1991-05-04 3,432,463 126,856 0
1991-05-11 3,397,547 107,333 0
1991-05-18 3,263,858 126,840 0
1991-05-25 3,112,630 106,445 0
1991-06-01 3,287,482 129,379 0
1991-06-08 3,163,914 110,989 0
1991-06-15 3,156,829 113,856 0
1991-06-22 3,091,244 74,717 0
1991-06-29 2,924,193 68,549 0
1991-07-06 3,358,185 41,993 0
1991-07-13 3,309,752 34,347 0
1991-07-20 3,201,579 42,864 0
1991-07-27 3,190,516 25,721 0
1991-08-03 3,182,878 22,788 0
1991-08-10 3,113,994 24,399 0
1991-08-17 3,024,253 288,888 0
1991-08-24 2,972,750 77,995 0
1991-08-31 2,746,700 43,662 0
1991-09-07 2,925,583 51,926 0
1991-09-14 2,781,484 46,375 0
1991-09-21 2,734,297 44,598 0
1991-09-28 2,683,252 39,247 0
1991-10-05 2,696,948 32,179 0
1991-10-12 2,659,201 40,753 0
1991-10-19 2,825,341 37,264 0
1991-10-26 2,789,305 35,571 0
1991-11-02 2,870,891 31,347 43,964
1991-11-09 2,890,307 30,346 43,964
1991-11-16 3,092,006 31,321 43,964
1991-11-23 2,829,992 15,280 43,964
1991-11-30 3,610,580 9,217 43,964
1991-12-07 3,402,784 9,062 1,170,437
1991-12-14 3,572,651 8,109 1,170,437
1991-12-21 3,196,364 6,461 1,170,437
1991-12-28 3,892,825 6,721 1,170,437
1992-01-04 4,579,808 7,779 1,642,921
1992-01-11 4,299,596 7,331 1,642,921
1992-01-18 4,150,431 7,176 1,642,921
1992-01-25 4,268,278 7,333 1,642,921
1992-02-01 4,183,090 6,650 1,266,805
1992-02-08 4,124,242 5,642 1,266,805
1992-02-15 4,059,031 5,917 1,266,805
1992-02-22 4,349,456 6,425 1,266,805
1992-02-29 4,166,527 9,853 1,266,805
1992-03-07 4,035,656 11,305 1,884,877
1992-03-14 4,013,378 15,281 1,884,877
1992-03-21 3,949,383 10,558 1,884,877
1992-03-28 3,886,602 15,784 1,884,877
1992-04-04 3,739,852 13,549 1,904,596
1992-04-11 3,632,866 12,575 1,904,596
1992-04-18 3,523,544 9,621 1,904,596
1992-04-25 3,495,074 15,376 1,904,596
1992-05-02 3,363,357 7,750 1,413,947
1992-05-09 3,301,375 11,581 1,413,947
1992-05-16 3,174,536 17,700 1,413,947
1992-05-23 3,006,251 14,134 1,413,947
1992-05-30 3,183,943 15,746 1,413,947
1992-06-06 3,072,648 16,159 1,777,196
1992-06-13 3,068,161 13,346 1,777,196
1992-06-20 3,043,443 13,018 1,777,196
1992-06-27 2,949,113 11,676 1,777,196
1992-07-04 3,177,864 12,510 1,793,078
1992-07-11 3,229,794 8,028 1,793,078
1992-07-18 3,241,101 5,632 1,793,078
1992-07-25 3,263,787 13,300 1,793,078
1992-08-01 3,396,435 7,878 1,190,568
1992-08-08 3,070,121 4,490 1,190,568
1992-08-15 3,040,598 3,850 1,190,568
1992-08-22 2,934,497 2,407 1,190,568
1992-08-29 2,848,766 1,763 1,190,568
1992-09-05 2,703,550 1,692 1,643,908
1992-09-12 2,886,862 1,684 1,643,908
1992-09-19 2,694,188 1,938 1,643,908
1992-09-26 2,675,867 2,093 1,643,908
1992-10-03 2,554,616 1,967 1,291,889
1992-10-10 2,517,921 2,000 1,291,889
1992-10-17 2,704,117 2,100 1,291,889
1992-10-24 2,618,236 2,219 1,291,889
1992-10-31 2,629,343 2,091 1,291,889
1992-11-07 2,608,308 2,225 1,558,787
1992-11-14 2,828,401 2,574 1,558,787
1992-11-21 2,501,413 2,242 1,558,787
1992-11-28 3,121,895 2,644 1,558,787
1992-12-05 2,931,482 2,607 1,792,136
1992-12-12 2,996,839 2,401 1,792,136
1992-12-19 2,762,783 2,655 1,792,136
1992-12-26 3,081,524 2,348 1,792,136
1993-01-02 3,645,928 2,877 1,302,798
1993-01-09 3,521,923 2,877 1,302,798
1993-01-16 3,462,299 2,792 1,302,798
1993-01-23 3,519,619 3,286 1,302,798
1993-01-30 3,415,281 3,243 1,302,798
1993-02-06 3,300,855 3,437 1,482,701
1993-02-13 3,268,593 3,338 1,482,701
1993-02-20 3,415,050 4,089 1,482,701
1993-02-27 3,385,943 4,092 1,482,701
1993-03-06 3,330,579 4,358 1,773,845
1993-03-13 3,228,155 4,159 1,773,845
1993-03-20 3,254,354 4,591 1,773,845
1993-03-27 3,205,670 4,319 1,773,845
1993-04-03 3,067,296 4,443 1,589,694
1993-04-10 3,089,193 4,387 1,589,694
1993-04-17 3,002,866 4,479 1,589,694
1993-04-24 2,920,812 4,653 1,589,694
1993-05-01 2,760,035 4,838 1,131,102
1993-05-08 2,794,149 4,900 1,131,102
1993-05-15 2,703,864 4,752 1,131,102
1993-05-22 2,628,435 4,810 1,131,102
1993-05-29 2,541,922 4,245 1,131,102
1993-06-05 2,676,593 4,687 1,612,206
1993-06-12 2,663,727 4,264 1,612,206
1993-06-19 2,671,572 4,649 1,612,206
1993-06-26 2,619,628 4,154 1,612,206
1993-07-03 2,478,423 4,139 1,194,962
1993-07-10 2,906,628 4,241 1,194,962
1993-07-17 2,802,764 4,172 1,194,962
1993-07-24 2,775,536 4,142 1,194,962
1993-07-31 2,797,059 4,244 1,194,962
1993-08-07 2,702,058 4,044 1,606,695
1993-08-14 2,661,369 4,247 1,606,695
1993-08-21 2,600,564 4,052 1,606,695
1993-08-28 2,539,536 4,182 1,606,695
1993-09-04 2,341,294 3,732 1,462,008
1993-09-11 2,541,929 4,828 1,462,008
1993-09-18 2,408,210 4,295 1,462,008
1993-09-25 2,379,074 5,065 1,462,008
1993-10-02 2,307,990 4,942 999,485
1993-10-09 2,263,355 5,921 999,485
1993-10-16 2,469,181 23,511 999,485
1993-10-23 2,441,893 33,209 999,485
1993-10-30 2,465,420 36,524 999,485
1993-11-06 2,396,951 39,105 1,101,776
1993-11-13 2,641,316 45,020 1,101,776
1993-11-20 2,351,073 43,527 1,101,776
1993-11-27 2,984,877 54,186 1,101,776
1993-12-04 2,802,130 51,970 1,307,789
1993-12-11 2,901,584 64,579 1,307,789
1993-12-18 2,785,060 60,112 1,307,789
1993-12-25 2,891,093 56,738 1,307,789
1994-01-01 3,451,906 58,891 745,073
1994-01-08 3,535,758 62,326 745,073
1994-01-15 3,282,640 55,573 745,073
1994-01-22 3,631,286 59,214 745,073
1994-01-29 3,513,611 51,558 745,073
1994-02-05 3,435,756 60,210 657,915
1994-02-12 3,683,476 60,085 657,915
1994-02-19 3,367,472 57,245 657,915
1994-02-26 3,551,818 59,056 657,915
1994-03-05 3,434,003 48,319 435,579
1994-03-12 3,401,560 41,726 435,579
1994-03-19 3,268,577 40,347 435,579
1994-03-26 3,162,970 38,793 435,579
1994-04-02 3,061,774 47,095 145,853
1994-04-09 3,041,236 45,871 145,853
1994-04-16 2,910,893 42,743 145,853
1994-04-23 2,790,775 41,034 145,853
1994-04-30 2,779,530 40,224 145,853
1994-05-07 2,665,118 40,739 53,887
1994-05-14 2,706,054 44,002 53,887
1994-05-21 2,579,654 46,969 53,887
1994-05-28 2,497,917 39,536 53,887
1994-06-04 2,597,327 44,664 3,533
1994-06-11 2,565,632 59,968 3,533
1994-06-18 2,518,476 49,773 3,533
1994-06-25 2,535,974 63,554 3,533
1994-07-02 2,412,459 43,772 1,317
1994-07-09 2,773,087 60,490 1,317
1994-07-16 2,732,599 45,683 1,317
1994-07-23 2,623,374 56,589 1,317
1994-07-30 2,572,653 51,941 1,317
1994-08-06 2,540,094 55,239 987
1994-08-13 2,513,841 51,150 987
1994-08-20 2,457,267 44,819 987
1994-08-27 2,419,345 40,206 987
1994-09-03 2,230,690 34,058 505
1994-09-10 2,349,300 35,309 505
1994-09-17 2,225,734 30,565 505
1994-09-24 2,178,392 50,716 505
1994-10-01 2,137,551 27,203 302
1994-10-08 2,064,891 23,071 302
1994-10-15 2,263,842 29,531 302
1994-10-22 2,165,673 25,622 302
1994-10-29 2,220,736 26,388 302
1994-11-05 2,133,056 24,370 386
1994-11-12 2,381,978 27,073 386
1994-11-19 2,098,273 24,096 386
1994-11-26 2,707,331 27,547 386
1994-12-03 2,522,230 25,507 403
1994-12-10 2,632,546 34,897 403
1994-12-17 2,594,569 25,973 403
1994-12-24 2,670,022 21,603 403
1994-12-31 2,984,464 21,610 403
1995-01-07 3,279,500 28,309 256
1995-01-14 3,175,041 24,204 256
1995-01-21 3,216,177 27,276 256
1995-01-28 3,213,382 26,954 256
1995-02-04 3,134,272 25,846 156
1995-02-11 3,207,132 28,170 156
1995-02-18 3,133,161 25,811 156
1995-02-25 3,204,131 31,576 156
1995-03-04 3,121,694 29,028 230
1995-03-11 3,119,667 30,941 230
1995-03-18 2,995,586 29,055 230
1995-03-25 2,943,203 31,873 230
1995-04-01 2,794,357 29,701 97
1995-04-08 2,722,912 27,231 97
1995-04-15 2,691,694 29,619 97
1995-04-22 2,644,422 33,412 97
1995-04-29 2,554,447 32,428 97
1995-05-06 2,457,846 35,457 89
1995-05-13 2,480,930 34,872 89
1995-05-20 2,443,163 35,811 89
1995-05-27 2,335,967 28,441 89
1995-06-03 2,461,449 36,009 97
1995-06-10 2,419,386 31,071 97
1995-06-17 2,427,460 31,000 97
1995-06-24 2,436,340 30,767 97
1995-07-01 2,340,978 22,901 84
1995-07-08 2,732,085 32,745 84
1995-07-15 2,758,145 25,072 84
1995-07-22 2,581,771 22,210 84
1995-07-29 2,530,741 24,422 84
1995-08-05 2,490,459 23,117 73
1995-08-12 2,485,705 24,144 73
1995-08-19 2,422,309 22,063 73
1995-08-26 2,390,073 25,508 73
1995-09-02 2,210,165 18,183 56
1995-09-09 2,339,884 23,467 56
1995-09-16 2,241,660 27,261 56
1995-09-23 2,191,872 24,520 56
1995-09-30 2,150,322 23,163 56
1995-10-07 2,137,089 22,637 67
1995-10-14 2,287,364 26,512 67
1995-10-21 2,243,571 28,009 67
1995-10-28 2,320,779 27,818 67
1995-11-04 2,216,489 24,943 59
1995-11-11 2,490,433 26,218 59
1995-11-18 2,184,493 16,969 59
1995-11-25 2,877,427 30,475 59
1995-12-02 2,656,766 26,630 397
1995-12-09 2,728,165 28,518 397
1995-12-16 2,697,721 25,033 397
1995-12-23 2,850,875 23,500 397
1995-12-30 3,247,083 23,717 397
1996-01-06 3,413,218 23,714 80
1996-01-13 3,333,401 23,597 80
1996-01-20 3,540,541 27,133 80
1996-01-27 3,323,616 27,791 80
1996-02-03 3,478,998 34,498 72
1996-02-10 3,355,399 19,563 72
1996-02-17 3,342,990 17,235 72
1996-02-24 3,338,754 18,289 72
1996-03-02 3,342,705 18,734 81
1996-03-09 3,201,206 17,033 81
1996-03-16 3,202,660 18,726 81
1996-03-23 3,164,741 17,502 81
1996-03-30 3,024,165 17,996 81
1996-04-06 2,859,763 17,247 69
1996-04-13 2,863,152 17,800 69
1996-04-20 2,683,264 17,410 69
1996-04-27 2,637,661 17,582 69
1996-05-04 2,507,686 17,016 40
1996-05-11 2,488,233 16,966 40
1996-05-18 2,416,069 26,394 40
1996-05-25 2,339,833 20,781 40
1996-06-01 2,388,712 28,106 21
1996-06-08 2,323,461 34,759 21
1996-06-15 2,386,954 56,546 21
1996-06-22 2,367,235 56,872 21
1996-06-29 2,300,336 59,832 21
1996-07-06 2,541,008 61,100 55
1996-07-13 2,602,457 63,302 55
1996-07-20 2,483,728 61,845 55
1996-07-27 2,422,359 66,592 55
1996-08-03 2,385,453 64,522 34
1996-08-10 2,365,772 56,627 34
1996-08-17 2,329,766 51,241 34
1996-08-24 2,285,520 50,433 34
1996-08-31 2,155,991 49,350 34
1996-09-07 2,151,401 39,823 46
1996-09-14 2,126,617 36,976 46
1996-09-21 2,063,758 36,601 46
1996-09-28 2,046,399 36,784 46
1996-10-05 2,017,091 36,701 11
1996-10-12 2,017,568 35,829 11
1996-10-19 2,089,401 37,262 11
1996-10-26 2,114,095 37,411 11
1996-11-02 2,132,820 35,669 11
1996-11-09 2,161,346 35,780 11
1996-11-16 2,269,588 37,211 11
1996-11-23 2,089,365 30,099 11
1996-11-30 2,665,436 38,095 11
1996-12-07 2,510,409 36,791 22
1996-12-14 2,583,736 33,613 22
1996-12-21 2,492,733 27,760 22
1996-12-28 2,963,014 27,387 22
1997-01-04 3,463,488 25,297 13
1997-01-11 3,154,405 27,934 13
1997-01-18 3,079,660 19,537 13
1997-01-25 3,121,143 25,168 13
1997-02-01 3,075,836 17,978 1
1997-02-08 3,002,628 19,877 1
1997-02-15 3,000,842 16,017 1
1997-02-22 3,021,501 20,965 1
1997-03-01 2,965,029 15,388 2
1997-03-08 2,849,015 19,218 2
1997-03-15 2,822,167 15,320 2
1997-03-22 2,673,275 18,206 2
1997-03-29 2,658,495 15,089 2
1997-04-05 2,537,604 18,029 3
1997-04-12 2,492,526 15,760 3
1997-04-19 2,360,559 17,008 3
1997-04-26 2,360,123 15,303 3
1997-05-03 2,248,914 16,186 1
1997-05-10 2,220,623 15,048 1
1997-05-17 2,129,628 14,951 1
1997-05-24 2,049,585 13,392 1
1997-05-31 2,134,330 14,537 1
1997-06-07 2,095,697 13,489 0
1997-06-14 2,102,818 13,287 0
1997-06-21 2,120,516 11,972 0
1997-06-28 2,086,511 10,723 0
1997-07-05 2,298,155 11,436 6
1997-07-12 2,374,873 10,948 6
1997-07-19 2,277,474 10,061 6
1997-07-26 2,220,593 10,760 6
1997-08-02 2,158,673 10,287 3
1997-08-09 2,156,429 10,405 3
1997-08-16 2,150,121 9,795 3
1997-08-23 2,093,529 9,817 3
1997-08-30 1,975,630 9,767 3
1997-09-06 1,984,104 18,993 2
1997-09-13 1,896,913 18,494 2
1997-09-20 1,858,333 24,291 2
1997-09-27 1,846,827 23,861 2
1997-10-04 1,815,543 27,175 3
1997-10-11 1,824,149 22,756 3
1997-10-18 1,865,051 27,050 3
1997-10-25 1,890,804 21,861 3
1997-11-01 1,920,216 30,930 1
1997-11-08 1,901,881 22,201 1
1997-11-15 2,084,725 33,457 1
1997-11-22 1,936,503 24,135 1
1997-11-29 2,361,053 28,348 1
1997-12-06 2,234,663 26,188 9
1997-12-13 2,359,933 26,410 9
1997-12-20 2,176,094 14,809 9
1997-12-27 2,641,360 10,028 9
1998-01-03 3,220,379 11,742 6
1998-01-10 2,920,464 10,653 6
1998-01-17 2,825,904 9,649 6
1998-01-24 2,847,622 10,732 6
1998-01-31 2,812,103 10,567 6
1998-02-07 2,760,212 10,285 4
1998-02-14 2,756,562 9,550 4
1998-02-21 2,761,373 10,791 4
1998-02-28 2,760,298 10,884 4
1998-03-07 2,644,826 13,786 4
1998-03-14 2,689,876 11,742 4
1998-03-21 2,559,963 14,274 4
1998-03-28 2,522,857 29,908 4
1998-04-04 2,330,092 20,950 2
1998-04-11 2,367,715 32,070 2
1998-04-18 2,271,841 25,200 2
1998-04-25 2,182,196 33,462 2
1998-05-02 2,061,834 28,030 1
1998-05-09 2,040,981 31,519 1
1998-05-16 1,984,330 28,809 1
1998-05-23 1,929,470 27,557 1
1998-05-30 1,972,217 28,052 1
1998-06-06 1,959,375 31,804 2
1998-06-13 1,998,428 28,950 2
1998-06-20 2,015,427 17,673 2
1998-06-27 2,122,275 10,723 2
1998-07-04 2,288,426 7,937 6
1998-07-11 2,439,363 8,604 6
1998-07-18 2,364,063 8,069 6
1998-07-25 2,345,663 8,016 6
1998-08-01 2,260,795 8,051 1
1998-08-08 2,145,231 8,410 1
1998-08-15 2,081,043 8,030 1
1998-08-22 2,022,369 8,236 1
1998-08-29 1,961,538 8,398 1
1998-09-05 1,834,805 7,588 1
1998-09-12 1,896,631 8,835 1
1998-09-19 1,755,175 8,203 1
1998-09-26 1,776,513 8,209 1
1998-10-03 1,754,780 9,292 0
1998-10-10 1,770,682 8,523 0
1998-10-17 1,846,221 8,891 0
1998-10-24 1,829,701 9,097 0
1998-10-31 1,878,156 9,143 0
1998-11-07 1,870,985 8,905 3
1998-11-14 2,035,988 11,724 3
1998-11-21 1,902,679 11,491 3
1998-11-28 2,358,605 25,474 3
1998-12-05 2,224,639 26,146 4
1998-12-12 2,325,972 25,111 4
1998-12-19 2,156,010 17,073 4
1998-12-26 2,519,274 17,055 4
1999-01-02 3,102,803 22,764 5
1999-01-09 2,925,639 23,968 5
1999-01-16 2,899,074 19,828 5
1999-01-23 2,838,376 34,578 5
1999-01-30 2,866,062 27,596 5
1999-02-06 2,755,371 20,016 0
1999-02-13 2,756,402 9,482 0
1999-02-20 2,796,509 12,811 0
1999-02-27 2,756,455 9,826 0
1999-03-06 2,674,203 15,166 0
1999-03-13 2,669,244 11,331 0
1999-03-20 2,579,218 14,912 0
1999-03-27 2,481,736 10,940 0
1999-04-03 2,454,339 14,844 0
1999-04-10 2,397,037 11,954 0
1999-04-17 2,299,426 14,266 0
1999-04-24 2,210,766 12,189 0
1999-05-01 2,158,730 13,623 0
1999-05-08 2,084,090 11,962 0
1999-05-15 2,092,662 10,945 0
1999-05-22 2,016,199 11,814 0
1999-05-29 1,996,237 10,207 0
1999-06-05 2,027,717 11,477 0
1999-06-12 2,043,367 11,022 0
1999-06-19 2,016,305 10,907 0
1999-06-26 2,058,950 10,834 0
1999-07-03 2,037,207 9,675 0
1999-07-10 2,265,903 10,041 0
1999-07-17 2,267,935 9,143 0
1999-07-24 2,168,250 8,725 0
1999-07-31 2,100,715 9,655 0
1999-08-07 2,082,742 8,829 0
1999-08-14 2,054,918 8,717 0
1999-08-21 2,009,515 8,632 0
1999-08-28 1,962,571 9,055 0
1999-09-04 1,839,585 7,527 0
1999-09-11 1,884,516 9,612 0
1999-09-18 1,810,641 8,602 0
1999-09-25 1,792,628 9,264 0
1999-10-02 1,752,639 8,779 0
1999-10-09 1,721,641 8,300 0
1999-10-16 1,790,807 9,043 0
1999-10-23 1,765,882 9,326 0
1999-10-30 1,808,851 9,335 0
1999-11-06 1,788,877 8,939 0
1999-11-13 1,896,552 8,181 0
1999-11-20 1,807,214 8,045 0
1999-11-27 2,223,176 10,421 0
1999-12-04 2,083,224 9,657 0
1999-12-11 2,178,683 9,297 0
1999-12-18 2,131,398 9,377 0
1999-12-25 2,277,164 7,042 0
2000-01-01 2,797,032 9,637 0
2000-01-08 2,718,011 9,173 0
2000-01-15 2,622,496 9,150 0
2000-01-22 2,578,830 9,650 0
2000-01-29 2,709,376 9,942 0
2000-02-05 2,647,347 9,503 0
2000-02-12 2,689,832 9,826 0
2000-02-19 2,547,906 9,137 0
2000-02-26 2,659,519 10,226 0
2000-03-04 2,505,022 10,404 0
2000-03-11 2,489,643 14,768 0
2000-03-18 2,355,623 12,356 0
2000-03-25 2,330,647 14,976 0
2000-04-01 2,192,124 12,962 0
2000-04-08 2,138,870 15,155 0
2000-04-15 2,032,276 12,772 0
2000-04-22 2,040,124 14,323 0
2000-04-29 1,980,211 13,807 0
2000-05-06 1,878,017 14,512 0
2000-05-13 1,859,180 13,450 0
2000-05-20 1,821,815 13,496 0
2000-05-27 1,796,901 12,087 0
2000-06-03 1,872,139 12,085 0
2000-06-10 1,858,584 10,855 0
2000-06-17 1,893,136 10,571 0
2000-06-24 1,898,593 9,866 0
2000-07-01 1,886,296 8,778 0
2000-07-08 2,165,968 10,283 0
2000-07-15 2,185,786 9,573 0
2000-07-22 2,036,658 9,314 0
2000-07-29 2,029,390 9,508 0
2000-08-05 1,994,491 9,733 0
2000-08-12 2,001,617 8,585 0
2000-08-19 1,986,026 9,449 0
2000-08-26 1,934,980 8,119 0
2000-09-02 1,865,729 7,930 0
2000-09-09 1,885,703 9,166 0
2000-09-16 1,790,898 8,669 0
2000-09-23 1,758,588 8,653 0
2000-09-30 1,729,889 8,364 0
2000-10-07 1,757,202 8,489 0
2000-10-14 1,826,932 8,539 0
2000-10-21 1,789,426 8,462 0
2000-10-28 1,860,793 8,133 0
2000-11-04 1,809,658 7,621 0
2000-11-11 2,011,228 7,879 0
2000-11-18 1,934,902 7,141 0
2000-11-25 2,437,065 8,632 0
2000-12-02 2,250,807 8,164 0
2000-12-09 2,356,941 8,098 0
2000-12-16 2,395,999 7,862 0
2000-12-23 2,563,972 6,677 0
2000-12-30 3,023,158 6,801 0
2001-01-06 3,107,168 7,698 0
2001-01-13 2,871,777 5,592 0
2001-01-20 3,088,350 8,365 0
2001-01-27 2,987,872 7,181 0
2001-02-03 3,090,731 6,736 0
2001-02-10 2,971,967 6,516 0
2001-02-17 3,040,116 6,203 0
2001-02-24 3,051,248 6,688 0
2001-03-03 3,082,794 6,564 0
2001-03-10 2,997,183 7,315 0
2001-03-17 3,016,621 10,546 0
2001-03-24 2,890,410 7,834 0
2001-03-31 2,873,909 10,514 0
2001-04-07 2,699,746 7,582 0
2001-04-14 2,867,349 9,834 0
2001-04-21 2,734,000 8,387 0
2001-04-28 2,695,531 9,593 0
2001-05-05 2,574,954 8,158 0
2001-05-12 2,635,395 8,858 0
2001-05-19 2,584,015 7,924 0
2001-05-26 2,636,945 7,426 0
2001-06-02 2,701,334 7,949 0
2001-06-09 2,707,698 6,290 0
2001-06-16 2,727,709 5,775 0
2001-06-23 2,752,868 5,738 0
2001-06-30 2,687,581 5,074 0
2001-07-07 3,115,547 5,869 0
2001-07-14 3,125,893 5,578 0
2001-07-21 2,924,372 5,494 0
2001-07-28 2,962,343 5,862 0
2001-08-04 2,921,492 6,342 0
2001-08-11 2,953,745 6,269 0
2001-08-18 2,877,704 6,151 0
2001-08-25 2,883,514 6,338 0
2001-09-01 2,763,205 6,435 0
2001-09-08 2,816,923 7,136 0
2001-09-15 2,726,305 7,816 0
2001-09-22 2,761,525 8,767 0
2001-09-29 2,820,554 8,372 0
2001-10-06 2,823,038 7,253 0
2001-10-13 2,989,944 9,413 0
2001-10-20 3,055,227 9,147 0
2001-10-27 3,115,836 9,476 0
2001-11-03 3,205,972 9,420 0
2001-11-10 3,204,123 9,821 0
2001-11-17 3,167,873 9,651 0
2001-11-24 3,749,089 12,527 0
2001-12-01 3,654,055 12,806 0
2001-12-08 3,694,195 12,926 0
2001-12-15 3,764,466 14,374 0
2001-12-22 3,647,086 11,766 0
2001-12-29 4,258,259 12,593 0
2002-01-05 4,713,249 15,318 0
2002-01-12 4,318,922 37,853 0
2002-01-19 4,353,865 43,507 0
2002-01-26 4,292,316 47,236 0
2002-02-02 4,375,417 48,883 0
2002-02-09 4,264,562 50,010 0
2002-02-16 4,297,774 50,590 0
2002-02-23 4,260,855 53,976 0
2002-03-02 4,284,487 55,834 0
2002-03-09 4,134,684 74,822 0
2002-03-16 4,158,354 28,170 116,860
2002-03-23 3,983,543 19,573 680,230
2002-03-30 4,084,409 14,478 640,963
2002-04-06 3,874,277 15,603 1,135,355
2002-04-13 3,808,147 10,176 1,031,273
2002-04-20 3,660,980 11,268 1,431,057
2002-04-27 3,654,986 121,683 1,260,190
2002-05-04 3,491,604 42,618 1,417,291
2002-05-11 3,504,304 14,579 1,218,783
2002-05-18 3,393,688 10,322 1,435,039
2002-05-25 3,346,416 7,247 1,241,434
2002-06-01 3,376,308 7,057 1,454,156
2002-06-08 3,386,421 5,748 1,342,775
2002-06-15 3,337,649 4,243 1,227,521
2002-06-22 3,362,961 7,879 1,181,367
2002-06-29 3,240,792 5,680 1,058,060
2002-07-06 3,591,684 5,318 1,143,066
2002-07-13 3,613,990 4,471 1,014,317
2002-07-20 3,429,058 4,213 1,074,560
2002-07-27 3,388,975 5,085 1,031,574
2002-08-03 3,335,310 5,620 1,095,393
2002-08-10 3,300,574 5,966 1,026,032
2002-08-17 3,290,623 6,205 1,099,868
2002-08-24 3,221,724 7,204 1,072,096
2002-08-31 3,079,605 6,662 1,076,086
2002-09-07 3,135,572 7,998 1,056,826
2002-09-14 3,042,544 15,902 970,214
2002-09-21 3,017,628 18,119 915,449
2002-09-28 2,983,685 19,206 851,857
2002-10-05 3,006,174 20,609 858,396
2002-10-12 2,998,883 18,493 812,401
2002-10-19 3,052,872 19,284 806,631
2002-10-26 3,090,077 19,690 798,258
2002-11-02 3,169,628 21,111 789,139
2002-11-09 3,130,957 20,641 767,691
2002-11-16 3,297,554 22,649 783,768
2002-11-23 3,137,767 23,689 732,457
2002-11-30 3,656,232 25,372 787,977
2002-12-07 3,579,447 26,728 777,230
2002-12-14 3,668,462 25,263 782,522
2002-12-21 3,462,276 25,537 734,091
2002-12-28 4,122,152 24,806 804,019
2003-01-04 4,522,614 58,634 511,416
2003-01-11 4,161,522 28,911 713,808
2003-01-18 4,104,728 26,077 722,376
2003-01-25 4,187,601 30,902 838,955
2003-02-01 4,183,930 28,216 684,095
2003-02-08 4,126,001 28,757 812,176
2003-02-15 4,121,758 25,992 689,030
2003-02-22 4,226,999 29,478 822,510
2003-03-01 4,222,249 27,522 736,765
2003-03-08 4,128,320 29,328 790,691
2003-03-15 4,096,174 27,288 760,977
2003-03-22 3,969,458 28,443 802,004
2003-03-29 3,901,725 26,504 786,355
2003-04-05 3,729,202 26,871 802,777
2003-04-12 3,762,283 30,283 788,603
2003-04-19 3,679,276 33,613 811,550
2003-04-26 3,645,420 33,542 808,950
2003-05-03 3,528,224 35,388 830,037
2003-05-10 3,482,198 33,969 827,900
2003-05-17 3,423,861 34,457 841,369
2003-05-24 3,320,374 32,625 822,256
2003-05-31 3,462,332 35,372 848,207
2003-06-07 3,399,074 33,601 852,865
2003-06-14 3,420,430 33,588 850,999
2003-06-21 3,416,544 32,497 854,406
2003-06-28 3,354,472 30,620 831,861
2003-07-05 3,654,070 32,486 854,034
2003-07-12 3,722,439 32,685 836,911
2003-07-19 3,571,072 32,389 836,793
2003-07-26 3,539,094 31,882 851,421
2003-08-02 3,446,303 32,360 833,469
2003-08-09 3,410,835 32,020 833,771
2003-08-16 3,372,081 32,437 827,062
2003-08-23 3,283,198 32,108 836,950
2003-08-30 3,150,177 32,168 805,795
2003-09-06 3,204,701 33,015 839,247
2003-09-13 3,071,976 45,369 814,898
2003-09-20 3,042,002 49,490 832,295
2003-09-27 2,998,915 46,615 820,505
2003-10-04 2,985,549 42,788 842,594
2003-10-11 2,931,605 40,022 812,698
2003-10-18 3,033,482 41,280 825,816
2003-10-25 2,989,696 41,547 816,099
2003-11-01 3,064,803 41,869 820,173
2003-11-08 3,034,428 39,109 806,109
2003-11-15 3,179,577 38,775 811,980
2003-11-22 2,988,791 37,547 778,518
2003-11-29 3,442,478 39,511 807,763
2003-12-06 3,329,438 41,719 807,205
2003-12-13 3,440,652 38,367 817,072
2003-12-20 3,288,710 34,734 765,570
2003-12-27 3,778,746 30,909 791,877
2004-01-03 4,195,806 35,872 787,817
2004-01-10 3,900,647 35,718 695,525
2004-01-17 3,844,512 35,490 619,526
2004-01-24 3,822,888 40,799 546,914
2004-01-31 3,897,217 51,118 496,346
2004-02-07 3,823,650 52,359 417,609
2004-02-14 3,773,248 48,706 361,723
2004-02-21 3,785,388 15,444 302,840
2004-02-28 3,718,821 14,328 261,715
2004-03-06 3,595,351 14,690 200,971
2004-03-13 3,557,029 27,272 161,806
2004-03-20 3,429,056 31,746 113,476
2004-03-27 3,352,395 32,070 77,173
2004-04-03 3,153,679 32,545 52,775
2004-04-10 3,181,494 31,042 31,184
2004-04-17 3,076,771 31,013 23,334
2004-04-24 2,951,792 29,680 20,647
2004-05-01 2,874,418 17,250 17,142
2004-05-08 2,808,724 15,712 15,676
2004-05-15 2,772,021 15,318 13,882
2004-05-22 2,738,702 14,894 11,459
2004-05-29 2,670,015 14,144 10,895
2004-06-05 2,710,356 14,367 9,448
2004-06-12 2,770,224 13,696 8,336
2004-06-19 2,757,217 12,725 7,990
2004-06-26 2,780,067 11,245 7,256
2004-07-03 2,757,540 9,888 6,171
2004-07-10 2,934,289 10,083 6,217
2004-07-17 2,978,294 9,920 5,105
2004-07-24 2,855,479 9,156 4,919
2004-07-31 2,796,059 9,683 4,257
2004-08-07 2,776,054 9,351 0
2004-08-14 2,733,330 8,876 0
2004-08-21 2,657,239 8,858 0
2004-08-28 2,620,140 8,535 0
2004-09-04 2,495,787 8,218 0
2004-09-11 2,515,275 9,116 0
2004-09-18 2,439,905 9,372 0
2004-09-25 2,408,957 9,238 0
2004-10-02 2,363,139 9,428 0
2004-10-09 2,334,823 8,697 0
2004-10-16 2,447,248 9,270 0
2004-10-23 2,413,475 9,366 0
2004-10-30 2,478,952 9,166 0
2004-11-06 2,431,032 9,172 0
2004-11-13 2,573,907 9,063 0
2004-11-20 2,371,972 7,678 0
2004-11-27 2,929,815 10,067 0
2004-12-04 2,728,655 9,104 0
2004-12-11 2,868,469 9,331 0
2004-12-18 2,755,908 8,948 0
2004-12-25 3,074,495 7,933 0
2005-01-01 3,448,203 8,267 0
2005-01-08 3,392,002 8,724 0
2005-01-15 3,357,503 7,933 0
2005-01-22 3,310,809 9,364 0
2005-01-29 3,339,736 9,523 0
2005-02-05 3,260,554 9,129 0
2005-02-12 3,282,353 9,274 0
2005-02-19 3,137,993 9,080 0
2005-02-26 3,268,062 9,831 0
2005-03-05 3,127,029 9,472 0
2005-03-12 3,130,159 9,782 0
2005-03-19 2,950,789 13,097 0
2005-03-26 2,998,258 10,219 0
2005-04-02 2,847,497 13,509 0
2005-04-09 2,767,850 11,062 0
2005-04-16 2,648,489 13,361 0
2005-04-23 2,601,038 11,216 0
2005-04-30 2,543,938 13,396 0
2005-05-07 2,478,153 17,684 0
2005-05-14 2,435,204 19,584 0
2005-05-21 2,396,630 18,915 0
2005-05-28 2,377,117 18,617 0
2005-06-04 2,467,690 19,233 0
2005-06-11 2,433,509 17,345 0
2005-06-18 2,441,692 16,680 0
2005-06-25 2,453,783 12,721 0
2005-07-02 2,449,066 11,278 0
2005-07-09 2,665,771 11,612 0
2005-07-16 2,676,970 11,538 0
2005-07-23 2,546,836 11,420 0
2005-07-30 2,510,781 11,393 0
2005-08-06 2,480,670 11,545 0
2005-08-13 2,463,142 10,993 0
2005-08-20 2,423,651 7,462 0
2005-08-27 2,367,562 7,228 0
2005-09-03 2,257,201 6,420 0
2005-09-10 2,354,376 7,978 0
2005-09-17 2,391,428 7,750 0
2005-09-24 2,435,402 8,051 0
2005-10-01 2,412,876 7,646 0
2005-10-08 2,384,672 7,311 0
2005-10-15 2,481,398 8,212 0
2005-10-22 2,421,355 8,061 0
2005-10-29 2,460,103 8,020 0
2005-11-05 2,405,297 7,364 0
2005-11-12 2,610,047 8,524 0
2005-11-19 2,342,700 6,619 0
2005-11-26 2,745,342 9,447 0
2005-12-03 2,587,960 8,188 0
2005-12-10 2,757,670 8,473 0
2005-12-17 2,737,184 24,829 0
2005-12-24 2,871,986 12,027 0
2005-12-31 3,202,364 11,475 0
2006-01-07 3,212,874 12,985 0
2006-01-14 3,091,727 11,113 0
2006-01-21 3,100,504 12,549 0
2006-01-28 3,121,749 12,246 0
2006-02-04 3,054,188 11,366 0
2006-02-11 3,062,012 12,536 0
2006-02-18 2,950,227 15,375 0
2006-02-25 3,017,989 15,545 0
2006-03-04 2,904,163 11,751 0
2006-03-11 2,881,097 10,049 0
2006-03-18 2,792,671 9,851 0
2006-03-25 2,718,986 8,526 0
2006-04-01 2,610,620 8,848 0
2006-04-08 2,541,912 8,317 0
2006-04-15 2,520,826 8,809 0
2006-04-22 2,439,914 8,243 0
2006-04-29 2,334,654 11,106 0
2006-05-06 2,262,078 13,312 0
2006-05-13 2,273,254 11,733 0
2006-05-20 2,231,160 9,120 0
2006-05-27 2,198,190 7,312 0
2006-06-03 2,261,017 7,880 0
2006-06-10 2,261,656 7,612 0
2006-06-17 2,255,063 7,169 0
2006-06-24 2,296,552 6,947 0
2006-07-01 2,245,897 5,519 0
2006-07-08 2,555,344 6,879 0
2006-07-15 2,537,872 6,529 0
2006-07-22 2,398,145 6,278 0
2006-07-29 2,406,585 6,477 0
2006-08-05 2,387,381 6,299 0
2006-08-12 2,365,394 6,142 0
2006-08-19 2,307,310 6,074 0
2006-08-26 2,278,780 5,948 0
2006-09-02 2,170,652 5,368 0
2006-09-09 2,190,626 6,422 0
2006-09-16 2,100,335 6,592 0
2006-09-23 2,094,134 7,447 0
2006-09-30 2,077,047 6,565 0
2006-10-07 2,067,480 6,478 0
2006-10-14 2,155,687 6,693 0
2006-10-21 2,125,195 6,905 0
2006-10-28 2,189,125 23,572 0
2006-11-04 2,146,470 6,657 0
2006-11-11 2,310,049 7,033 0
2006-11-18 2,110,381 5,528 0
2006-11-25 2,663,513 8,153 0
2006-12-02 2,476,522 6,858 0
2006-12-09 2,620,289 7,263 0
2006-12-16 2,606,562 7,183 0
2006-12-23 2,696,884 5,906 0
2006-12-30 3,048,393 5,600 0
2007-01-06 3,167,506 7,523 0
2007-01-13 2,966,120 6,386 0
2007-01-20 3,147,388 7,481 0
2007-01-27 3,020,007 7,454 0
2007-02-03 3,122,873 7,532 0
2007-02-10 3,031,695 7,248 0
2007-02-17 3,115,740 7,018 0
2007-02-24 3,049,338 8,113 0
2007-03-03 3,056,104 7,891 0
2007-03-10 2,903,740 7,424 0
2007-03-17 2,862,583 7,458 0
2007-03-24 2,759,792 7,825 0
2007-03-31 2,723,719 7,584 0
2007-04-07 2,626,388 7,374 0
2007-04-14 2,668,643 7,707 0
2007-04-21 2,479,161 7,431 0
2007-04-28 2,483,338 7,679 0
2007-05-05 2,319,971 7,389 0
2007-05-12 2,360,003 7,687 0
2007-05-19 2,258,957 7,262 0
2007-05-26 2,291,494 6,925 0
2007-06-02 2,296,031 7,497 0
2007-06-09 2,328,218 7,074 0
2007-06-16 2,308,378 6,926 0
2007-06-23 2,384,848 6,969 0
2007-06-30 2,333,081 6,555 0
2007-07-07 2,613,764 6,715 0
2007-07-14 2,620,870 6,956 0
2007-07-21 2,496,368 6,486 0
2007-07-28 2,477,701 6,767 0
2007-08-04 2,442,353 6,388 0
2007-08-11 2,448,176 6,406 0
2007-08-18 2,403,434 6,204 0
2007-08-25 2,385,435 6,227 0
2007-09-01 2,269,281 5,821 0
2007-09-08 2,275,360 6,777 0
2007-09-15 2,194,801 6,611 0
2007-09-22 2,174,074 7,012 0
2007-09-29 2,147,306 6,808 0
2007-10-06 2,130,366 6,620 0
2007-10-13 2,210,517 6,806 0
2007-10-20 2,276,138 7,066 0
2007-10-27 2,295,401 7,243 0
2007-11-03 2,325,985 7,246 0
2007-11-10 2,328,570 7,042 0
2007-11-17 2,251,078 6,288 0
2007-11-24 2,764,198 7,950 0
2007-12-01 2,660,344 7,113 0
2007-12-08 2,740,292 7,378 0
2007-12-15 2,850,514 7,244 0
2007-12-22 2,850,577 6,474 0
2007-12-29 3,343,308 5,530 0
2008-01-05 3,551,115 8,226 0
2008-01-12 3,326,862 7,121 0
2008-01-19 3,301,483 7,125 0
2008-01-26 3,370,992 7,690 0
2008-02-02 3,389,690 7,976 0
2008-02-09 3,365,502 7,709 0
2008-02-16 3,346,635 7,595 0
2008-02-23 3,427,710 8,033 0
2008-03-01 3,386,318 8,500 0
2008-03-08 3,327,668 8,214 0
2008-03-15 3,301,329 8,443 0
2008-03-22 3,245,259 8,233 0
2008-03-29 3,242,028 8,477 0
2008-04-05 3,114,897 8,076 0
2008-04-12 3,095,541 8,731 0
2008-04-19 2,995,285 8,413 0
2008-04-26 2,994,211 8,577 0
2008-05-03 2,873,198 8,409 0
2008-05-10 2,874,400 9,095 0
2008-05-17 2,833,574 8,766 0
2008-05-24 2,782,820 8,210 0
2008-05-31 2,855,949 8,627 0
2008-06-07 2,825,821 8,822 0
2008-06-14 2,879,193 9,790 0
2008-06-21 2,883,151 9,498 0
2008-06-28 2,883,368 9,166 0
2008-07-05 3,149,190 9,514 0
2008-07-12 3,182,094 8,486 127,438
2008-07-19 3,222,204 5,239 607,368
2008-07-26 3,190,583 4,674 747,707
2008-08-02 3,224,027 4,320 1,406,779
2008-08-09 3,187,374 3,802 1,081,755
2008-08-16 3,201,617 3,576 1,550,093
2008-08-23 3,145,767 2,922 1,160,151
2008-08-30 3,088,985 2,036 1,525,890
2008-09-06 3,070,461 2,814 1,116,863
2008-09-13 3,045,415 2,768 1,559,198
2008-09-20 3,046,832 2,798 1,140,558
2008-09-27 3,084,473 3,020 1,500,780
2008-10-04 3,101,490 3,112 1,173,367
2008-10-11 3,162,425 9,904 1,050,369
2008-10-18 3,260,837 16,556 836,629
2008-10-25 3,338,377 19,750 820,503
2008-11-01 3,487,629 22,633 772,645
2008-11-08 3,549,315 23,740 766,565
2008-11-15 3,807,627 27,265 777,393
2008-11-22 3,680,470 27,589 729,256
2008-11-29 4,530,150 28,205 994,188
2008-12-06 4,410,184 6,424 1,482,317
2008-12-13 4,622,394 4,382 1,567,930
2008-12-20 4,597,693 2,720 1,922,488
2008-12-27 5,347,123 2,767 1,666,412
2009-01-03 5,882,118 4,263 2,094,313
2009-01-10 5,682,754 13,576 1,766,009
2009-01-17 5,746,900 15,417 1,878,648
2009-01-24 5,837,498 18,854 1,843,453
2009-01-31 5,984,686 2,447 1,942,568
2009-02-07 6,002,574 4,057 1,886,479
2009-02-14 6,138,622 3,979 1,968,812
2009-02-21 6,257,338 5,161 2,107,233
2009-02-28 6,382,246 6,224 2,125,546
2009-03-07 6,369,618 16,093 2,133,042
2009-03-14 6,460,286 16,674 2,211,572
2009-03-21 6,406,831 23,343 2,290,321
2009-03-28 6,467,137 33,290 2,186,657
2009-04-04 6,339,661 43,312 2,405,123
2009-04-11 6,420,511 47,544 2,330,828
2009-04-18 6,350,018 87,126 2,325,540
2009-04-25 6,291,020 224,978 2,206,177
2009-05-02 6,200,922 177,235 2,320,064
2009-05-09 6,212,285 402,400 2,236,303
2009-05-16 6,160,811 321,301 2,400,500
2009-05-23 6,041,691 514,324 2,312,898
2009-05-30 6,151,937 488,784 2,418,385
2009-06-06 6,091,080 615,924 2,491,024
2009-06-13 6,125,179 488,306 2,503,023
2009-06-20 6,089,313 711,136 2,585,797
2009-06-27 6,074,056 531,703 2,596,240
2009-07-04 6,190,667 742,350 2,705,018
2009-07-11 6,274,030 560,945 2,731,075
2009-07-18 6,119,747 753,213 2,826,724
2009-07-25 6,033,721 552,746 2,862,131
2009-08-01 5,915,426 737,683 2,953,835
2009-08-08 5,826,230 632,627 2,986,247
2009-08-15 5,701,888 821,791 3,072,236
2009-08-22 5,640,721 641,986 3,148,736
2009-08-29 5,458,004 817,835 3,167,720
2009-09-05 5,320,045 657,332 3,204,745
2009-09-12 5,244,747 688,310 3,301,559
2009-09-19 5,096,683 643,223 3,349,767
2009-09-26 5,042,145 651,200 3,376,451
2009-10-03 4,979,537 637,075 3,419,177
2009-10-10 4,944,717 577,933 3,395,826
2009-10-17 5,013,610 601,224 3,487,393
2009-10-24 4,963,631 574,701 3,509,480
2009-10-31 4,998,333 629,120 3,569,348
2009-11-07 4,919,381 597,129 3,583,412
2009-11-14 5,117,677 635,345 3,852,611
2009-11-21 4,840,469 434,088 4,195,322
2009-11-28 5,440,685 537,096 4,218,262
2009-12-05 5,230,256 389,930 4,456,514
2009-12-12 5,384,207 397,188 4,869,420
2009-12-19 5,129,475 319,507 5,140,373
2009-12-26 5,527,913 306,501 4,980,124
2010-01-02 6,053,403 266,114 5,635,626
2010-01-09 5,833,032 263,829 5,348,277
2010-01-16 5,642,564 226,561 5,629,285
2010-01-23 5,724,807 239,118 5,491,377
2010-01-30 5,724,618 210,054 5,795,648
2010-02-06 5,635,204 191,433 5,479,190
2010-02-13 5,583,858 182,392 5,685,912
2010-02-20 5,632,738 169,175 5,527,451
2010-02-27 5,580,024 163,087 5,885,754
2010-03-06 5,440,771 159,273 5,625,723
2010-03-13 5,393,395 159,608 5,891,783
2010-03-20 5,245,207 150,032 5,590,944
2010-03-27 5,091,072 156,851 5,852,143
2010-04-03 5,023,427 197,989 5,344,082
2010-04-10 4,966,487 256,402 5,197,739
2010-04-17 4,830,568 258,480 5,349,618
2010-04-24 4,708,545 278,078 5,190,820
2010-05-01 4,582,703 301,133 5,095,265
2010-05-08 4,505,485 341,449 5,053,266
2010-05-15 4,445,550 369,247 4,998,428
2010-05-22 4,416,120 450,862 4,987,711
2010-05-29 4,240,366 501,844 4,798,099
2010-06-05 4,357,043 584,100 4,727,008
2010-06-12 4,343,110 426,188 4,516,594
2010-06-19 4,370,073 449,870 4,160,150
2010-06-26 4,350,941 432,029 3,907,004
2010-07-03 4,426,515 468,855 3,509,073
2010-07-10 4,607,230 429,945 3,285,271
2010-07-17 4,605,288 629,249 3,332,029
2010-07-24 4,490,073 729,184 4,145,702
2010-07-31 4,385,173 829,006 4,694,058
2010-08-07 4,330,927 942,689 4,820,132
2010-08-14 4,269,802 904,721 4,556,751
2010-08-21 4,176,505 963,379 4,507,669
2010-08-28 4,195,871 857,617 4,105,555
2010-09-04 3,988,826 952,089 4,219,465
2010-09-11 3,985,711 916,929 3,965,778
2010-09-18 3,867,272 1,015,706 4,123,513
2010-09-25 3,840,355 911,504 3,888,001
2010-10-02 3,765,303 1,035,364 4,040,113
2010-10-09 3,779,696 879,647 3,779,795
2010-10-16 3,841,668 1,038,743 3,978,374
2010-10-23 3,832,009 915,589 3,900,038
2010-10-30 3,856,139 970,043 3,961,485
2010-11-06 3,808,850 867,847 3,801,294
2010-11-13 3,946,401 960,545 3,944,168
2010-11-20 3,738,012 800,247 3,711,136
2010-11-27 4,297,596 985,296 3,854,067
2010-12-04 4,136,623 897,947 3,789,029
2010-12-11 4,262,088 825,947 3,711,288
2010-12-18 4,191,665 965,513 3,577,663
2010-12-25 4,496,393 880,721 3,773,092
2011-01-01 4,866,738 1,004,062 3,719,607
2011-01-08 4,733,581 841,816 3,783,493
2011-01-15 4,691,327 904,927 3,656,624
2011-01-22 4,710,149 841,851 3,756,990
2011-01-29 4,679,975 880,301 3,629,604
2011-02-05 4,646,032 769,581 3,685,361
2011-02-12 4,657,417 858,558 3,653,267
2011-02-19 4,412,892 710,799 3,600,522
2011-02-26 4,529,383 823,477 3,541,942
2011-03-05 4,363,035 725,111 3,627,654
2011-03-12 4,340,840 781,851 3,588,816
2011-03-19 4,193,680 715,857 3,563,031
2011-03-26 4,150,419 769,052 3,550,786
2011-04-02 4,002,528 720,537 3,527,093
2011-04-09 3,951,075 722,720 3,448,260
2011-04-16 3,838,801 680,723 3,447,542
2011-04-23 3,824,515 715,454 3,415,581
2011-04-30 3,775,544 668,584 3,468,979
2011-05-07 3,634,019 662,571 3,411,860
2011-05-14 3,597,297 652,864 3,416,540
2011-05-21 3,558,396 624,901 3,381,090
2011-05-28 3,473,454 597,037 3,293,507
2011-06-04 3,537,947 659,676 3,299,235
2011-06-11 3,539,984 640,021 3,300,706
2011-06-18 3,559,474 593,147 3,256,523
2011-06-25 3,603,475 599,626 3,234,115
2011-07-02 3,585,349 546,283 3,154,001
2011-07-09 3,835,014 589,977 3,172,428
2011-07-16 3,805,620 536,560 3,184,621
2011-07-23 3,733,068 546,641 3,158,312
2011-07-30 3,633,881 529,376 3,130,608
2011-08-06 3,606,657 553,938 3,086,781
2011-08-13 3,609,633 560,567 3,118,042
2011-08-20 3,523,932 539,297 3,060,622
2011-08-27 3,488,028 543,455 3,066,671
2011-09-03 3,344,269 510,135 2,997,259
2011-09-10 3,359,956 546,675 3,036,635
2011-09-17 3,258,729 526,315 3,027,447
2011-09-24 3,219,328 540,211 3,016,035
2011-10-01 3,167,556 520,740 2,967,054
2011-10-08 3,190,489 529,648 2,921,937
2011-10-15 3,258,683 545,051 2,945,642
2011-10-22 3,258,088 580,544 2,953,824
2011-10-29 3,270,956 528,446 2,935,466
2011-11-05 3,237,168 559,903 2,896,640
2011-11-12 3,436,807 553,182 2,972,894
2011-11-19 3,224,531 520,093 2,794,284
2011-11-26 3,760,869 597,825 3,048,926
2011-12-03 3,603,969 569,344 2,941,157
2011-12-10 3,685,961 576,587 2,926,135
2011-12-17 3,676,656 575,433 2,932,561
2011-12-24 3,843,663 532,298 2,926,676
2011-12-31 4,225,896 537,023 3,026,855
2012-01-07 4,173,069 535,310 2,922,533
2012-01-14 4,134,039 478,103 3,007,696
2012-01-21 4,122,094 518,926 2,985,907
2012-01-28 4,160,302 479,833 3,002,475
2012-02-04 4,044,828 494,062 2,903,219
2012-02-11 4,068,629 475,989 2,904,833
2012-02-18 3,942,099 480,723 2,929,210
2012-02-25 4,047,398 458,071 2,875,795
2012-03-03 3,917,086 466,521 2,852,383
2012-03-10 3,871,814 431,009 2,812,666
2012-03-17 3,756,804 445,504 2,815,108
2012-03-24 3,692,621 431,688 2,794,553
2012-03-31 3,522,661 431,458 2,775,134
2012-04-07 3,500,530 416,894 2,729,204
2012-04-14 3,476,845 360,161 2,724,432
2012-04-21 3,342,633 356,324 2,688,157
2012-04-28 3,258,745 311,834 2,666,055
2012-05-05 3,197,279 306,318 2,630,544
2012-05-12 3,172,142 317,720 2,618,445
2012-05-19 3,106,355 259,376 2,572,613
2012-05-26 3,110,301 140,918 2,551,539
2012-06-02 3,137,498 116,289 2,533,716
2012-06-09 3,148,590 65,045 2,645,554
2012-06-16 3,162,483 52,750 2,616,147
2012-06-23 3,192,771 48,915 2,606,287
2012-06-30 3,159,558 45,886 2,524,363
2012-07-07 3,409,074 40,918 2,556,456
2012-07-14 3,386,692 18,378 2,532,828
2012-07-21 3,295,424 11,776 2,412,938
2012-07-28 3,293,053 10,542 2,373,969
2012-08-04 3,228,381 9,977 2,326,635
2012-08-11 3,214,945 11,077 2,273,317
2012-08-18 3,164,295 9,192 2,263,614
2012-08-25 3,133,834 8,049 2,223,071
2012-09-01 2,977,662 7,990 2,162,532
2012-09-08 2,974,590 8,865 2,160,448
2012-09-15 2,889,169 27,695 2,143,049
2012-09-22 2,870,555 41,481 2,106,072
2012-09-29 2,833,983 41,558 2,098,793
2012-10-06 2,802,964 40,540 2,052,957
2012-10-13 2,866,400 41,582 2,098,646
2012-10-20 2,888,746 43,192 2,118,175
2012-10-27 2,835,012 42,211 2,095,605
2012-11-03 3,016,149 43,454 2,156,505
2012-11-10 2,997,790 43,042 2,119,054
2012-11-17 2,886,466 42,916 2,008,608
2012-11-24 3,371,048 46,529 2,194,253
2012-12-01 3,229,013 50,110 2,096,545
2012-12-08 3,300,758 50,666 2,096,243
2012-12-15 3,311,419 8,359 2,065,706
2012-12-22 3,339,517 6,457 1,991,454
2012-12-29 3,787,568 6,226 2,059,438
2013-01-05 3,920,030 6,906 1,693,797
2013-01-12 3,762,817 6,335 2,114,569
2013-01-19 3,726,522 6,258 1,826,098
2013-01-26 3,793,094 6,710 2,081,375
2013-02-02 3,715,221 6,525 1,819,056
2013-02-09 3,717,235 6,368 2,005,991
2013-02-16 3,584,179 6,562 1,780,626
2013-02-23 3,658,932 8,615 1,917,158
2013-03-02 3,546,720 5,368 1,780,843
2013-03-09 3,503,872 6,525 1,906,324
2013-03-16 3,445,502 6,338 1,799,625
2013-03-23 3,393,423 6,217 1,837,554
2013-03-30 3,337,244 6,142 1,782,555
2013-04-06 3,244,562 5,934 1,790,316
2013-04-13 3,144,857 7,683 1,777,737
2013-04-20 3,069,819 6,177 1,763,177
2013-04-27 3,011,832 6,410 1,792,101
2013-05-04 2,931,807 6,290 1,776,686
2013-05-11 2,816,252 6,329 1,726,659
2013-05-18 2,846,282 5,849 1,760,593
2013-05-25 2,780,543 5,100 1,703,458
2013-06-01 2,816,291 5,090 1,683,962
2013-06-08 2,819,467 5,009 1,707,109
2013-06-15 2,843,575 4,972 1,667,864
2013-06-22 2,821,373 4,828 1,660,883
2013-06-29 2,852,760 4,608 1,636,731
2013-07-06 3,197,085 7,869 1,614,185
2013-07-13 3,096,424 4,825 1,564,517
2013-07-20 2,969,631 4,332 1,516,275
2013-07-27 3,003,966 4,462 1,552,910
2013-08-03 2,899,575 4,405 1,501,068
2013-08-10 2,921,660 4,313 1,511,619
2013-08-17 2,869,302 4,165 1,494,742
2013-08-24 2,783,031 4,051 1,454,824
2013-08-31 2,557,877 4,113 1,315,963
2013-09-07 2,544,496 4,439 1,348,526
2013-09-14 2,502,350 4,804 1,470,027
2013-09-21 2,559,548 5,142 1,425,484
2013-09-28 2,525,496 5,257 1,379,118
2013-10-05 2,507,718 4,705 1,324,967
2013-10-12 2,570,047 3,650 1,305,937
2013-10-19 2,580,310 5,120 1,376,646
2013-10-26 2,560,996 5,289 1,333,709
2013-11-02 2,555,263 4,755 1,301,562
2013-11-09 2,601,469 4,818 1,304,899
2013-11-16 2,736,351 4,930 1,350,604
2013-11-23 2,549,404 4,501 1,248,932
2013-11-30 3,019,144 4,762 1,374,031
2013-12-07 2,926,459 5,760 1,333,332
2013-12-14 3,052,496 4,593 1,391,297
2013-12-21 2,900,167 3,967 1,287,037
2013-12-28 3,347,416 3,970 1,350,663
2014-01-04 3,658,854 5,728 0
2014-01-11 3,538,004 7,018 0
2014-01-18 3,420,830 7,333 0
2014-01-25 3,471,574 8,484 0
2014-02-01 3,486,027 9,267 0
2014-02-08 3,457,563 9,576 0
2014-02-15 3,411,627 9,576 0
2014-02-22 3,420,755 10,776 0
2014-03-01 3,319,168 10,114 0
2014-03-08 3,274,895 10,580 0
2014-03-15 3,172,583 10,331 0
2014-03-22 3,130,682 10,567 0
2014-03-29 2,980,287 9,971 0
2014-04-05 2,888,982 10,806 0
2014-04-12 2,793,392 10,061 0
2014-04-19 2,801,121 10,405 0
2014-04-26 2,675,671 9,930 0
2014-05-03 2,592,342 9,770 0
2014-05-10 2,527,531 9,624 0
2014-05-17 2,486,775 9,408 0
2014-05-24 2,425,098 8,424 0
2014-05-31 2,456,370 8,841 0
2014-06-07 2,417,798 8,334 0
2014-06-14 2,444,053 8,276 0
2014-06-21 2,443,597 7,851 0
2014-06-28 2,426,684 7,186 0
2014-07-05 2,590,343 6,224 0
2014-07-12 2,597,651 5,821 0
2014-07-19 2,558,970 5,640 0
2014-07-26 2,517,109 5,607 0
2014-08-02 2,496,280 5,334 0
2014-08-09 2,448,543 4,925 0
2014-08-16 2,439,121 4,738 0
2014-08-23 2,354,638 4,764 0
2014-08-30 2,247,246 4,418 0
2014-09-06 2,203,849 5,112 0
2014-09-13 2,152,323 5,249 0
2014-09-20 2,106,360 5,215 0
2014-09-27 2,068,286 5,293 0
2014-10-04 2,055,642 5,769 0
2014-10-11 2,044,373 5,356 0
2014-10-18 2,120,076 5,603 0
2014-10-25 2,083,192 5,390 0
2014-11-01 2,155,035 5,485 0
2014-11-08 2,105,373 5,211 0
2014-11-15 2,233,278 5,650 0
2014-11-22 2,138,546 5,015 0
2014-11-29 2,557,506 5,882 0
2014-12-06 2,392,766 6,947 0
2014-12-13 2,519,410 7,183 0
2014-12-20 2,389,483 6,109 0
2014-12-27 2,835,663 5,782 0
2015-01-03 3,027,942 6,264 0
2015-01-10 2,951,900 6,430 0
2015-01-17 2,822,646 6,080 0
2015-01-24 2,866,840 6,864 0
2015-01-31 2,832,836 7,418 0
2015-02-07 2,847,599 7,146 0
2015-02-14 2,788,137 7,130 0
2015-02-21 2,871,697 7,900 0
2015-02-28 2,838,532 7,577 0
2015-03-07 2,763,232 7,753 0
2015-03-14 2,737,677 7,791 0
2015-03-21 2,596,879 7,890 0
2015-03-28 2,505,835 7,016 0
2015-04-04 2,411,738 8,004 0
2015-04-11 2,418,874 7,819 0
2015-04-18 2,309,271 8,213 0
2015-04-25 2,224,434 8,052 0
2015-05-02 2,163,378 7,871 0
2015-05-09 2,104,356 7,907 0
2015-05-16 2,104,186 7,852 0
2015-05-23 2,042,124 6,717 0
2015-05-30 2,122,370 7,072 0
2015-06-06 2,079,512 7,102 0
2015-06-13 2,127,576 7,029 0
2015-06-20 2,129,848 6,145 0
2015-06-27 2,161,469 6,957 0
2015-07-04 2,259,274 6,429 0
2015-07-11 2,279,497 6,315 0
2015-07-18 2,282,015 6,417 0
2015-07-25 2,238,785 6,403 0
2015-08-01 2,234,021 6,183 0
2015-08-08 2,185,315 6,041 0
2015-08-15 2,187,442 6,298 0
2015-08-22 2,132,240 6,361 0
2015-08-29 2,086,072 6,463 0
2015-09-05 1,967,763 6,243 0
2015-09-12 1,963,079 7,045 0
2015-09-19 1,901,764 6,997 0
2015-09-26 1,895,401 7,215 0
2015-10-03 1,841,227 7,050 0
2015-10-10 1,850,274 6,917 0
2015-10-17 1,887,127 7,373 0
2015-10-24 1,900,367 7,480 0
2015-10-31 1,927,426 7,256 0
2015-11-07 1,930,219 7,215 0
2015-11-14 2,030,910 7,443 0
2015-11-21 1,916,040 6,130 0
2015-11-28 2,328,298 7,867 0
2015-12-05 2,232,126 7,581 0
2015-12-12 2,315,133 7,440 0
2015-12-19 2,216,196 6,853 0
2015-12-26 2,530,268 6,353 0
2016-01-02 2,829,326 7,053 0
2016-01-09 2,708,320 6,806 0
2016-01-16 2,682,657 6,922 0
2016-01-23 2,715,486 7,285 0
2016-01-30 2,704,783 7,409 0
2016-02-06 2,683,027 7,869 0
2016-02-13 2,635,413 6,925 0
2016-02-20 2,694,115 8,027 0
2016-02-27 2,623,381 7,939 0
2016-03-05 2,570,884 8,091 0
2016-03-12 2,512,347 8,122 0
2016-03-19 2,430,114 8,051 0
2016-03-26 2,395,639 8,484 0
2016-04-02 2,299,323 7,597 0
2016-04-09 2,229,676 8,323 0
2016-04-16 2,172,954 8,466 0
2016-04-23 2,111,562 8,286 0
2016-04-30 2,097,180 8,604 0
2016-05-07 2,030,840 8,043 0
2016-05-14 2,025,537 8,239 0
2016-05-21 1,991,996 8,171 0
2016-05-28 1,954,803 7,220 0
2016-06-04 1,997,981 7,483 0
2016-06-11 2,009,863 7,432 0
2016-06-18 2,024,202 7,109 0
2016-06-25 2,060,031 7,002 0
2016-07-02 2,051,725 6,421 0
2016-07-09 2,177,470 6,819 0
2016-07-16 2,159,423 6,499 0
2016-07-23 2,121,521 6,621 0
2016-07-30 2,126,862 6,583 0
2016-08-06 2,099,758 6,439 0
2016-08-13 2,078,694 6,227 0
2016-08-20 2,038,411 6,410 0
2016-08-27 1,989,525 6,124 0
2016-09-03 1,884,532 6,323 0
2016-09-10 1,852,433 6,822 0
2016-09-17 1,773,307 6,770 0
2016-09-24 1,762,067 6,843 0
2016-10-01 1,728,413 6,854 0
2016-10-08 1,725,226 6,977 0
2016-10-15 1,759,065 7,031 0
2016-10-22 1,760,928 7,427 0
2016-10-29 1,784,280 7,068 0
2016-11-05 1,760,538 7,093 0
2016-11-12 1,880,115 7,389 0
2016-11-19 1,765,649 7,009 0
2016-11-26 2,096,592 7,572 0
2016-12-03 2,017,005 7,287 0
2016-12-10 2,121,158 7,468 0
2016-12-17 2,137,974 7,338 0
2016-12-24 2,277,136 6,695 0
2016-12-31 2,489,172 6,572 0
2017-01-07 2,542,411 7,144 0
2017-01-14 2,485,917 6,834 0
2017-01-21 2,517,864 7,706 0
2017-01-28 2,504,140 7,525 0
2017-02-04 2,487,592 7,576 0
2017-02-11 2,510,609 7,667 0
2017-02-18 2,414,679 7,588 0
2017-02-25 2,467,874 7,776 0
2017-03-04 2,370,085 8,034 0
2017-03-11 2,301,523 7,554 0
2017-03-18 2,304,321 7,996 0
2017-03-25 2,241,074 7,526 0
2017-04-01 2,155,699 7,823 0
2017-04-08 2,060,159 7,449 0
2017-04-15 2,031,074 7,820 0
2017-04-22 1,966,805 7,653 0
2017-04-29 1,869,926 7,845 0
2017-05-06 1,798,389 7,509 0
2017-05-13 1,800,919 7,579 0
2017-05-20 1,775,333 7,367 0
2017-05-27 1,766,823 6,920 0
2017-06-03 1,798,547 6,686 0
2017-06-10 1,810,697 6,641 0
2017-06-17 1,826,807 6,642 0
2017-06-24 1,883,535 6,434 0
2017-07-01 1,854,373 5,904 0
2017-07-08 2,012,510 6,063 0
2017-07-15 1,989,147 6,042 0
2017-07-22 1,956,087 5,920 0
2017-07-29 1,936,484 5,725 0
2017-08-05 1,905,413 5,851 0
2017-08-12 1,901,564 5,524 0
2017-08-19 1,856,904 5,692 0
2017-08-26 1,827,730 5,909 0
2017-09-02 1,713,216 5,743 0
2017-09-09 1,753,503 5,928 0
2017-09-16 1,637,271 6,439 0
2017-09-23 1,629,511 6,316 0
2017-09-30 1,597,709 6,526 0
2017-10-07 1,581,603 6,143 0
2017-10-14 1,621,239 6,495 0
2017-10-21 1,625,272 6,384 0
2017-10-28 1,650,899 6,712 0
2017-11-04 1,640,055 6,183 0
2017-11-11 1,744,599 6,953 0
2017-11-18 1,636,127 7,366 0
2017-11-25 1,979,327 7,777 0
2017-12-02 1,888,606 7,885 0
2017-12-09 1,990,936 7,873 0
2017-12-16 2,006,218 7,899 0
2017-12-23 2,089,050 7,326 0
2017-12-30 2,322,153 7,171 0
2018-01-06 2,436,977 7,519 0
2018-01-13 2,305,639 7,442 0
2018-01-20 2,395,931 7,779 0
2018-01-27 2,328,589 7,785 0
2018-02-03 2,342,676 7,726 0
2018-02-10 2,278,079 7,669 0
2018-02-17 2,277,391 7,525 0
2018-02-24 2,249,590 7,760 0
2018-03-03 2,211,117 7,854 0
2018-03-10 2,124,666 7,905 0
2018-03-17 2,129,150 7,955 0
2018-03-24 2,018,587 7,988 0
2018-03-31 2,017,486 8,039 0
2018-04-07 1,944,247 7,862 0
2018-04-14 1,880,380 7,570 0
2018-04-21 1,752,466 7,016 0
2018-04-28 1,738,769 7,582 0
2018-05-05 1,607,813 7,025 0
2018-05-12 1,617,356 6,999 0
2018-05-19 1,586,220 6,747 0
2018-05-26 1,587,090 6,192 0
2018-06-02 1,572,024 6,118 0
2018-06-09 1,600,947 6,038 0
2018-06-16 1,598,338 5,877 0
2018-06-23 1,658,993 5,760 0
2018-06-30 1,649,013 5,386 0
2018-07-07 1,785,612 5,555 0
2018-07-14 1,773,703 5,328 0
2018-07-21 1,723,969 5,345 0
2018-07-28 1,743,506 5,314 0
2018-08-04 1,692,679 4,999 0
2018-08-11 1,682,295 5,057 0
2018-08-18 1,637,705 4,912 0
2018-08-25 1,613,226 5,012 0
2018-09-01 1,507,680 4,875 0
2018-09-08 1,474,401 5,404 0
2018-09-15 1,426,069 5,413 0
2018-09-22 1,407,903 5,464 0
2018-09-29 1,381,631 5,470 0
2018-10-06 1,363,429 5,510 0
2018-10-13 1,383,168 5,365 0
2018-10-20 1,396,629 5,625 0
2018-10-27 1,405,050 5,551 0
2018-11-03 1,449,725 5,605 0
2018-11-10 1,460,727 5,410 0
2018-11-17 1,450,639 5,462 0
2018-11-24 1,680,571 5,678 0
2018-12-01 1,664,485 5,814 0
2018-12-08 1,737,843 5,598 0
2018-12-15 1,779,289 5,715 0
2018-12-22 1,814,221 5,127 0
2018-12-29 2,094,433 5,221 0
2019-01-05 2,201,444 5,238 0
2019-01-12 2,134,252 5,547 0
2019-01-19 2,186,791 5,695 0
2019-01-26 2,128,207 5,871 0
2019-02-02 2,160,883 5,640 0
2019-02-09 2,100,069 5,696 0
2019-02-16 2,141,665 5,720 0
2019-02-23 2,126,759 6,161 0
2019-03-02 2,103,127 5,776 0
2019-03-09 2,022,078 6,064 0
2019-03-16 2,023,419 5,854 0
2019-03-23 1,921,755 6,020 0
2019-03-30 1,875,217 6,117 0
2019-04-06 1,742,160 6,088 0
2019-04-13 1,715,616 6,005 0
2019-04-20 1,659,388 5,984 0
2019-04-27 1,644,515 6,024 0
2019-05-04 1,549,802 6,127 0
2019-05-11 1,553,635 6,214 0
2019-05-18 1,519,221 5,999 0
2019-05-25 1,531,639 5,603 0
2019-06-01 1,547,918 5,576 0
2019-06-08 1,532,752 5,343 0
2019-06-15 1,568,423 5,276 0
2019-06-22 1,599,131 5,042 0
2019-06-29 1,620,654 5,109 0
2019-07-06 1,712,651 4,994 0
2019-07-13 1,707,490 4,829 0
2019-07-20 1,689,538 4,920 0
2019-07-27 1,675,329 4,809 0
2019-08-03 1,689,779 4,864 0
2019-08-10 1,629,666 4,823 0
2019-08-17 1,625,815 4,559 0
2019-08-24 1,576,686 4,704 0
2019-08-31 1,485,801 4,677 0
2019-09-07 1,474,941 5,205 0
2019-09-14 1,409,550 5,076 0
2019-09-21 1,392,814 5,462 0
2019-09-28 1,402,561 5,190 0
2019-10-05 1,379,082 5,327 0
2019-10-12 1,396,983 5,084 0
2019-10-19 1,429,795 5,533 0
2019-10-26 1,434,207 5,237 0
2019-11-02 1,460,587 5,648 0
2019-11-09 1,471,847 5,414 0
2019-11-16 1,556,207 5,811 0
2019-11-23 1,520,440 5,283 0
2019-11-30 1,767,477 5,761 0
2019-12-07 1,741,684 5,549 0
2019-12-14 1,812,416 5,726 0
2019-12-21 1,790,064 5,124 0
2019-12-28 2,159,054 4,959 0
2020-01-04 2,263,309 5,043 0
2020-01-11 2,153,778 5,302 0
2020-01-18 2,094,185 5,017 0
2020-01-25 2,166,741 5,463 0
2020-02-01 2,100,998 5,606 0
2020-02-08 2,111,816 5,571 0
2020-02-15 2,073,677 5,396 0
2020-02-22 2,115,070 5,628 0
2020-02-29 2,067,843 5,641 0
2020-03-07 1,988,414 5,584 0
2020-03-14 2,084,065 5,901 0
2020-03-21 3,421,790 5,449 0
2020-03-28 8,165,255 5,657 1,896
2020-04-04 12,447,014 5,544 5,951
2020-04-11 16,250,766 6,082 33,850
2020-04-18 17,753,647 5,290 66,456
2020-04-25 21,733,420 6,961 94,749
2020-05-02 20,824,955 6,229 177,133
2020-05-09 22,999,637 6,750 253,292
2020-05-16 18,994,257 5,985 276,225
2020-05-23 19,069,681 6,439 599,951
2020-05-30 19,066,545 5,222 1,143,411
2020-06-06 18,622,342 5,380 946,808
2020-06-13 17,748,469 4,752 836,516
2020-06-20 17,434,209 10,248 967,323
2020-06-27 16,531,031 9,367 1,018,865
2020-07-04 17,290,063 38,080 1,062,698
2020-07-11 16,300,975 110,948 1,092,153
2020-07-18 16,790,896 109,667 1,218,265
2020-07-25 15,811,340 169,245 1,287,499
2020-08-01 15,192,378 138,818 1,381,093
2020-08-08 14,098,559 227,097 1,497,806
2020-08-15 13,790,515 183,855 1,538,663
2020-08-22 13,062,885 256,446 1,588,668
2020-08-29 13,281,511 238,752 1,739,553
2020-09-05 12,366,538 298,566 1,815,558
2020-09-12 12,351,732 290,313 2,078,381
2020-09-19 11,001,315 377,040 2,215,139
2020-09-26 10,124,451 381,598 3,114,133
2020-10-03 8,884,945 478,268 3,612,262
2020-10-10 8,050,624 408,522 4,052,669
2020-10-17 7,429,628 582,465 4,301,105
2020-10-24 6,831,372 559,624 4,523,378
2020-10-31 6,442,814 638,176 4,707,851
2020-11-07 6,044,809 603,956 4,884,324
2020-11-14 5,902,358 683,703 4,901,839
2020-11-21 5,222,767 616,880 4,820,231
2020-11-28 5,778,354 696,955 5,056,738
2020-12-05 5,472,563 715,438 5,090,012
2020-12-12 5,407,194 805,748 5,164,407
2020-12-19 5,220,407 953,723 4,829,195
2020-12-26 5,354,403 1,330,893 4,546,337
2021-01-02 5,751,849 1,412,097 3,276,441
2021-01-09 5,470,091 1,508,067 4,229,119
2021-01-16 5,212,139 1,704,425 3,840,708
2021-01-23 5,185,331 1,655,020 5,131,851
2021-01-30 5,030,938 1,458,260 4,349,924
2021-02-06 4,962,162 1,389,914 5,624,898
2021-02-13 4,822,315 1,306,853 4,874,792
2021-02-20 4,837,105 1,322,583 6,013,096
2021-02-27 4,575,811 1,106,234 5,275,054
2021-03-06 4,486,653 1,069,724 6,220,492
2021-03-13 4,226,613 1,019,444 5,515,355
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Note: Emergency programs include the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation or PEUC program (enacted during the COVID-19 crisis), the Emergency Unemployment Compensation or EUC programs (enacted in the wake of the Great Recession and the recession of the early 1990s), and the Temporary Extended Unemployment Compensation or TEUC programs (enacted in the early 2000s).

Source: Authors' analysis of data from U.S. DOL-ETA (2021b), updating work from Chodorow-Reich, Coglianese, and Karabarbounis (2019).

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Context: How flaws with the current EB program’s on-triggers delay benefits and hurt workers in low unemployment states

Both of the triggers for turning on extended benefits have flaws. The insured unemployment rate often fails to reflect the true state of labor market distress because state UI policies can suppress UI recipiency in normal times. For example, if many of a state’s workers are unemployed, but because of strict eligibility guidelines are not receiving UI, then they are not counted in the IUR. States that use the standard unemployment rate triggers for EB see many more unemployed workers newly enrolled due to EB triggering-on during periods of labor market weakness.10

Both triggers are state-specific only and hence cannot be triggered on by deterioration in the national labor markets. Failing to include national as well as state triggers is problematic for several reasons. First, as mentioned above, residents of an otherwise low-unemployment state who live in a region with higher unemployment that is suffering due to a deterioration in the national labor market could be frozen out of aid. Second, without national triggers providing for wider extension of PBDs, the EB program provides a weaker macroeconomic stabilizer effect. Finally, without national triggers, states may suffer lags in extending benefits. A state with low unemployment as the national labor market deteriorates is highly likely to see its own unemployment rate rise shortly. Policymakers once recognized the value of a national trigger in helping states stay ahead of the curve: The EB program included a national unemployment trigger until the 1981 Omnibus Reconciliation Act.11

Context: How flaws with the current EB program’s off-triggers prompt premature withdrawal of needed assistance

By far the biggest problem with the current UI system’s EB triggers is that benefits are set to trigger off too early during periods of extended labor market distress. The EB program contains “look-back” provisions which trigger benefits off if there has been no significant increase in unemployment over the past two years. In essence, the EB program was structured under an implicit assumption (not so wrong before the 1990s) that labor market recovery would happen very quickly after recessions hit. So, for example, if unemployment rises even to an extremely elevated level like 9% and then stays there for two years, the EB provisions would automatically trigger off. This is not an academic concern. The national unemployment rate hit 9.0% in April 2009, but remained at 9.0% (or higher) until September 2011.

Context: How the ad hoc off-triggers for emergency aid hurt workers

After the 20 weeks of EB benefits (including both tier 1 and tier 2) are added to normal UI benefits, further extensions to PBDs have to be legislated on an ad hoc basis by Congress. In recent decades these extensions were labeled “temporary emergency unemployment compensation” or “emergency unemployment compensation” (TEUC or EUC), and were fully federally financed. These programs have been tied to calendar periods rather than economic conditions, and often lapse well before the economy recovers. For example, the federally financed extended benefits included in the CARES Act passed in April 2020 as a response to the COVID-19 economic shock—the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) benefits—lapsed at the end of 2020, when the virus was surging and the labor market remained very weak.

Sometimes these lapses are temporary, and longer PBDs are reextended after a short break, but temporary income losses can be devastating to households on tight budgets even if the programs are reextended and payments are retroactive —and cause extreme anxiety among workers depending on benefits.12 Sometimes these lapses are permanent. The EUC program put into place during the Great Recession in 2008 was allowed to completely lapse by the end of 2013, when unemployment had just barely dipped below 7% nationally and sat above its highest level during the early 2000s recession and jobless recovery. And by late May 2021, half of the states had announced plans to cut off their residents’ access to some or all of the emergency programs enacted in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic: the PEUC program as well as the Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (PUC) program offering $300 weekly in enhanced benefits and the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program offering benefits to workers traditionally denied UI, like self-employed workers (Berger 2021; Zeballos-Roig and Kaplan 2021).13 This threatened to cause extraordinary harm to vulnerable families and to impede economic recovery (Cooper 2021). Given that workers of color bore the brunt of the coronavirus downturn, they are at risk, once again, of being left behind (Gould and Wilson 2020; Gould, Perez, and Wilson 2020).

These glaring flaws regarding the triggers of extended PBDs—automatic extensions that trigger on too slowly and unevenly and can trigger off while the labor market remains weak, and the reliance on congressional whim rather than economic conditions to determine further PBD extensions—can be fixed by reforms we suggest below.

Policy proposal: Reform the Extended Benefits program to trigger on quickly as the labor market deteriorates and trigger off only when genuine recovery is underway

To ensure that unemployment benefits trigger on quickly as labor market distress begins and remain in place until the labor market mounts a genuine recovery, we propose the parameters for triggering on and off new tiers of PBD shown below in Table 4.1. Triggers-on are determined by the minimum of state or national unemployment rates—not the insured unemployment rate—and are determined by either a prespecified unemployment rate or a change in the unemployment rate. Triggers-off require both a reduction in either the state or national unemployment rate and an improvement in state-level measures of the share of adults between the ages of 25 and 54 with a job, known as the prime-age employment-to-population (EPOP) ratio. We sometimes refer to the prime-age EPOP ratio as a “failsafe” criterion, in that it will keep PBDs from falling into a lower tier based on improvements in the unemployment rate that are driven solely by reductions in labor force participation.

Table 4.1

Proposed tiers of extended benefits and economic benchmarks that trigger on or off additional extended benefits

Tier of extended benefits Potential benefit duration in tier Benchmarks that trigger on tier of benefits Benchmarks that trigger off tier of benefits (fall in unemployment must be accompanied by rise in share of prime-age adults with a job)
1 30 weeks Unemployment rate is less than 5% or less than 1.2 times the previous minimum Unemployment rate falls below 5% or is less than 1.2 times the previous minimum, AND prime-age EPOP has improved by 0.2 percentage points (ppt.) over past three months***
2 33 weeks Unemployment rate reaches 5% or 1.3 times previous minimum Unemployment rate reaches 5% or 1.3 times previous minimum, AND prime-age EPOP has improved by 0.2 ppt. over past three months
3 46 weeks Unemployment rate reaches 6% or 1.6 times initial previous minimum Unemployment rate reaches 6% or 1.6 times initial previous minimum, AND prime-age EPOP has improved by 0.2 ppt. over past three months
4 59 weeks Unemployment rate reaches 7% or 2 times initial previous minimum Unemployment rate reaches 7% or 2 times initial previous minimum, AND prime-age EPOP has improved by 0.2 ppt. over past three months
5 72 weeks Unemployment rate reaches 8% or 2.4 times initial previous minimum Unemployment rate reaches 8% or 2.4 times initial previous minimum, AND prime-age EPOP has improved by 0.2 ppt. over past three months
6 85 weeks Unemployment rate reaches 9% or 2.8 times initial previous minimum Unemployment rate reaches 9% or 2.8 times initial previous minimum, AND prime-age EPOP has improved by 0.2 ppt. over past three months
7 98 weeks Unemployment rate reaches 10% or 3.2 times initial previous minimum Unemployment rate reaches 10% or 3.2 times initial previous minimum, AND prime-age EPOP has improved by 0.2 ppt. over past three months

Note: The tier of potential benefit duration kicks in when the national or state unemployment rate (calculated as a three-month moving average) reaches the rate shown OR the comparative level shown. The comparative level is calculated as a ratio of the three-month moving average unemployment rate to the lowest unemployment rate achieved during the 12 months prior to the first calculation triggering on tier 1. For the first potential bump up to tier 1, the last month of the three-month moving average is also the last month of the 12-month comparison period. EPOP stands for employment-to-population ratio. The potential change in prime-age EPOP is calculated by comparing the current three-month period (which ends with the month when the PBD is set to fall under the employment rate criterion) with the prior three-month period.

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Triggers-on proposal

The key to effective triggers to turning on extended UI benefits is to ensure they respond quickly and provide longer PBDs as the labor market falters. We propose the on-triggers respond to the minimum of state or national unemployment rates. Existing triggers were designed in an era when unemployment rate expectations were much higher than today. As the Federal Reserve (2020) has observed, “it has become increasingly clear that low unemployment can be sustained without leading to an unwanted increase in inflation.”

Thus, we recommend that the first tier of longer PBDs (rising from 30 to 33 weeks) be triggered on when the state or national unemployment rate hits 5%. However, to ensure that states with traditionally low unemployment rates can see longer PBDs as their unemployment rate deteriorates quickly, we also allow the tier to be triggered on by a rise in the unemployment rate to 1.2 times the minimum unemployment rate that prevailed in the previous 12 months. So, if in July 2021 a state experienced an unemployment rate of 3.5% in any one of the months between the previous July through June, an unemployment rate of 4.2% in July 2021 would trigger on the first tier (33 weeks) of longer PBDs. This modification ensures that PBD extensions respond quickly to obvious deterioration in the labor market (say that caused by the onset of a health crisis like COVID-19 or by hurricanes and other natural disasters), even when the labor market was starting from a healthy state with a historically low unemployment rate.

From the first tier of extended PBDs, each additional percentage-point increase in the unemployment rate would trigger longer PBDs, as shown in Table 4.1. PBDs max out at 98 weeks for unemployment rates of 10% or higher. The unemployment rate levels that trigger on each new tier of PBD largely follow the recommendations of Dube 2021.

Triggers-off proposal

In addition to making UI benefit extensions quickly responsive to downturns, we also propose reforms aimed at keeping PBDs from falling during those periods when overall unemployment is stabilizing or declining for the “wrong” reason—when people have stopped their active job search and are dropping out of official counts of the labor force, and so are not counted as unemployed.14 To ensure that higher tiers of PBD only trigger off when unemployment rates are declining and those declines are driven by rising employment, we propose adding a second (necessary but not sufficient) trigger-off that requires a 0.2 percentage-point reduction in a state’s prime-age employment-to-population ratio (the share of the population ages 25 to 54 with a job).

Ending benefits puts unemployed worker behind the eight ball again: Jean Thompson, Maine

“I was unemployed before the pandemic. [Despite receiving state benefits] I was scrambling to keep the electricity on, my car from being repossessed, and my phone and internet from being cut off. I was awakened every day by creditors calling me. I was a nervous wreck. When I qualified for the additional $600 a week I was able to pay my bills and start paying off my debts. I could sleep at night and my health improved.

[But] each time when the [emergency] programs were coming to an end I would get anxious again, wondering if I was going back to debtor’s hell. I think we live in a very cruel country where you only deserve housing, food, education, and health care if you can work and pay for them yourself.”

So, for example, say that the state and national unemployment rate falls from 8% to 7% (and assume the alternative triggers-on don’t apply in this situation because the state and national economies entered the recession with a relatively high unemployment rate). All else being equal, this would lead to a reduction in PBD from 72 to 59 weeks according to Table 4.1. But, if over the last three months the prime-age EPOP averages a level that shows no improvement (or an improvement of only 0.1 percentage points) when compared with the prior (nonoverlapping) three-month period, then the PBD will remain at 72 weeks. Only when the unemployment rate is below 8% and there has been a 0.2 percentage-point improvement in the nonoverlapping three-month average of prime-age EPOPs will the PBD slide down to a lower tier. This same 0.2 percentage-point improvement is needed each time the unemployment rate falls far enough to push PBDs down to another tier. Because it is a necessary condition over and above improvements in unemployment, we refer to the required prime-age EPOP improvement as a “failsafe” condition.

The usefulness of this approach to making triggers automatic can be seen during and after the Great Recession. If these triggers had been in place, 37 states in 2014 and 2015 would have continued to have at least some tier of extended benefits in place rather than having all benefit extensions cut off at the end of 2013, when Congress forced them to lapse.

The prime-age EPOP failsafe would have been useful in this time as well. Nationally, the unemployment rate fell by a full percentage point (from 9.9% to 8.8%) between April 2010 and October 2011. All else being equal, this would lead to a reduction in PBD in the current proposal. But, over this same period, the prime-age EPOP actually fell by 0.3 percentage points. If the unemployment rate falls even as employment declines, this means by definition that all of the “improvement” in the unemployment rate was driven by reductions in the labor force participation rate—a reduction which itself was largely caused by the depressed labor market. A prime-age EPOP failsafe would keep PBD from falling in this situation.

Policy proposal: Improve data sources

Currently, the Bureau of Labor Statistics does not calculate state-level prime-age EPOPs that are measured precisely enough to make the PBD determinations we recommend. Accordingly, part of our policy proposal is a requirement that the BLS adds a prime-age EPOP measure to its monthly Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS). This should be easily within its existing capability and resources.

A related and even more pressing data enhancement needed to establish useful triggers for extending UI benefit duration would be the ability to better measure group-specific unemployment rates. It is well-known that state-level unemployment rates calculated for particular racial or ethnic groups or even educational groups are inaccurate and change a great deal from month to month because household surveys do not reach enough members of the affected groups.15 Further, declining response rates among some racial and ethnic groups are actually making these household surveys even less useful in calculating group-specific labor market outcomes (Baker and Cai 2021).

Despite this measurement problem, significant evidence shows that workers of color often are still struggling to find work even as the economy overall recovers from recessions.16 There is a clear fairness argument for providing better ways to calculate group-specific employment rates: Our economic policy should be designed to improve the labor market experiences of all demographic groups, not just those who are quickest to recover. There is also an economic argument. Often those workers recovering fastest in the wake of economic downturns are white and college-educated workers who tend to have higher incomes and wealth than those still experiencing high unemployment. Improving labor market outcomes for more advantaged groups can conceal the continuing need to support poorer households who need it most. Cutting off benefits too soon for poorer families also slows the economic recovery, as they are usually the most apt to spend (Bivens 2017).

Ideally, we would measure group-specific unemployment rates finely enough to require that all (or at least most) group-specific unemployment rates declined before triggering off an extended tier of PBDs. Because today’s statistical infrastructure does not allow measures that are precise or timely enough to make these requirements reasonable, we further call on the BLS to expand the sample size of existing household surveys and explore other measures to ensure reliable, real-time data on labor market outcomes at much finer levels of geographic and group-specific detail.

Finally, we call for higher-quality and more finely disaggregated collection of data within the UI system. One promising avenue to construct group-specific triggers could be to use “exit rates” from UI receipt to employment, to determine the pace of needed labor market improvement. The existing data on UI recipients is plagued with a host of deficiencies and challenges that would currently make this impossible (see, for example, Cajner et al. 2020). Fixing this data collection is vital not only for a number of needed policy reforms but also for construction of even better benefits on- and off-triggers in the future.

Common criticisms of extended potential benefit durations

Unemployment benefits that last longer than the standard six months are sometimes criticized for discouraging work and thus keeping unemployment high. But the consensus among academic studies of unemployment insurance rejects this claim. There is little persuasive evidence that unemployment insurance (UI) significantly reduces job-search activity among people receiving it (Young 2012). Further, during recessions (when extended benefits often kick in), the number of jobs in the economy is rationed by aggregate demand, not labor supply, so reduced job-search activity has little to no effect on aggregate employment (Marinescu 2017). Even if there were, for some workers the ability to turn down a job is exactly the function UI is supposed to serve: By giving job seekers a financial cushion, UI benefits allow them to turn down low-paying jobs that poorly match their skills. In addition to better serving the worker, this ability to turn down ill-fitting work boosts the economy in the long run, as workers are more productive in their best-matched positions.

Although there is some evidence that extended durations of UI benefits reduces job search activity among some workers, there are offsetting effects that lead to no net impact on work. Marinescu (2017) provides an accessible explanation. Briefly, if some workers reduce their search effort, the labor market is less “congested,” making it easier for others to find a job.

In support of the claim that UI mostly improves job matching, rather than just allowing workers to stay home, economists point to the fact that UI seems to have little effect on the labor decisions of families who can already afford to wait for a better job opportunity. For example, Chetty (2008) finds that longer durations of unemployment associated with lengthier benefit duration are driven overwhelmingly by workers without liquid wealth.

Empirical efforts to measure the causal influence of extensions of UI benefit duration on aggregate unemployment or job-search behavior have found these effects to be at most modest, likely due to many of the cross-cutting effects noted above. For example, Boone et al. (2021), Chodorow-Reich, Coglianese, and Karabarbounis (2019), Farber and Valleta (2015), Farber, Rothstein and Valleta (2015), and Rothstein (2011) all find extremely limited effects of more-generous PBDs of harming job search or leading to longer UI benefit durations or boosting aggregate unemployment rates.17

In short, narratives about “moral hazard” and UI benefits discouraging work are largely unfounded. Instead, they play on stereotypes about the undeserving poor, and serve to mask the general failure of U.S. policy to provide families with effective ways of saving for hard times. Black families, in particular, have been denied access to traditional methods of building wealth, leaving them in greater need of unemployment insurance benefits to weather hard times (Bhutta et al. 2020).

Endnotes

1. Authors’ analysis of the data underlying Figure 4B referenced later in this chapter.

2. See Farooq, Kugler, and Muratori 2020 for evidence that longer UI benefit durations can increase the quality of a job match.

3. The social insurance function of UI essentially works as a substitute for other instruments that can help laid-off workers smooth consumption over a spell of job loss, the most obvious other instrument being private wealth. Given that holdings of private wealth are highly unequal, and that households with less education or headed by historically discriminated-against groups have less private wealth, it stands to reason that these groups will be most in need of an alternative instrument to private wealth (like UI) for maintaining consumption over a spell of job loss.

4. Whittaker and Isaacs (2019) include a list of the states with benefit durations of less than 26 weeks in the pre-COVID period.

5. As of early May, the Tennessee General Assembly had approved cutting unemployment eligibility weeks.

6. See Chodorow-Reich and Coglianese 2019 for this finding that regular UI benefits provide the majority of fiscal impulse (when combined with extended benefits), even during steep recessions.

7. See McHugh and Kimball 2015 for evidence on low-duration states seeing lower recipiency rates overall. Some of this correlation is clearly related to other factors: The reduced PBDs are obviously a sign of state government indifference or hostility to effective UI benefits generally, and so likely are accompanied by other aspects of the UI system (eligibility requirements or administrative features) that also reduce recipiency. But, as described in the main text, there are also independent causal effects running from reduced PBD to lower recipiency.

8. Anderson and Meyer 1997 provide evidence that lower benefit durations reduce takeup rates. The generosity of benefit levels matters the most for take-up rates.

9. For a list of states with the respective triggers, see U.S. DOL-ETA 2021a.

10. Mastri, Vroman, Needels, and Nicholson (2015) note that states were encouraged to adopt total unemployment rate triggers during the Great Recession because the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act provided 100% of EB financing. They find that adopting these triggers resulted in much-higher first EB payments (or number of new UI enrollees under the EB program).

11. See Lake 2002 for a history of these provisions.

12. See Kaverman and Stettner 2021 for how such delays harmed UI recipients when benefits lapsed in January 2021.

13. A particular target of Republican governors was the $300 in enhanced benefits included in the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (enhanced weekly UI benefits initially enacted under the CARES Act totaled $600 but were allowed to lapse in August 2020). For more on the controversial governors’ attacks on the emergency benefits, see Adamczyk 2021.

14. Traditional unemployment measures estimate the share of individuals looking for work who cannot find it. In contrast, labor force participation measures the overall share of the population that is working. Severe economic conditions can lead to some potential workers giving up on finding work, leading to a measured drop in unemployment that does not reflect an actual improvement in economic conditions.

15. For example, in a recent estimate of unemployment rates by state and race, Moore (2021) finds that over half of states lack a sufficient sample size to reliably calculate the Black unemployment rate.

16. See, for example, Cajner et al. 2017.

17. It is true that some papers, notably that by Hagedorn, Karahan, Manovskii, and Mitman (2015) find large effects, but as Boone et al. (2021) explain, that study has at least three substantial methodological problems.

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See related work on Unemployment insurance | Unemployment | Black Americans | Latinx Americans | Stimulus/stabilization policy | Women | Nonstandard work arrangements | Gig economy | Contingent workforce | Coronavirus