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The 2019 EARN Conference is being held in downtown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania—an ideal setting to discuss many of the country’s most pressing questions around economic development and racial equity. This year’s EARNCON is being organized in collaboration with the Economic Policy Institute’s Program on Race, Ethnicity, and the Economy (PREE) to ensure that race and racial justice are front and center in the conference’s discussions of state and local policy.

Pittsburgh is frequently celebrated as a model of progressive change and often appears in lists of the “most livable” and “greenest” cities in the United States. Historically a locus of heavy manufacturing, “Steel City” underwent a dramatic transformation after the deindustrialization of the North and collapse of the steel industry in the 1980s. Pittsburgh successfully leveraged its strong educational and health care institutions to build one of the country’s most vibrant regional economies, one centered on education, technology, and health care. In fact, Pittsburgh’s health care sector today is a larger share of the regional economy than the steel industry was in its heyday. And just as workers joined together in unions to ensure jobs in the steel mills were good, safe jobs, health care workers in Pittsburgh are organizing now for fair pay and benefits.

Yet Pittsburgh is also a place of stark racial divides. The gap in household income between black and white families in the Pittsburgh area is wider than the national average. People of color in the region have disproportionately low rates of employment and homeownership and significantly higher rates of poverty. Pittsburgh’s neighborhoods are some of the most segregated in the country. And as technology and financial services companies have come in, community leaders have had to combat gentrification and involuntary displacement of long-term residents, particularly in historically black neighborhoods.

EARNCON is a three-day gathering that brings together EARN’s nearly 60 groups from 44 states—along with thought leaders on issues related to socioeconomic and racial inequality—to share stories, present research, discuss strategies, sharpen skills, and make plans to advance pro-worker and racial justice policies in the 2020 legislative session and help shape the debate around economic policy in advance of the 2020 state and national elections.

The 2019 EARN Conference continues EARN’s tradition of bringing together leading economic thinkers, policy experts, labor activists, community organizers, faith leaders, and academic researchers to learn from each other and develop strategies and policies that improve job quality and economic security for all workers while addressing long-standing racial disparities in economic outcomes. Building power in states and cities is more important than ever, and EARN is an essential foundation for progressive action across the country.

Conference dates: October 2–4, 2019*

*A pre-conference meeting for EARN state group executive directors, will take place on Wednesday, October 2, from 11:30 am–4:30 pm. A boot camp for EARN data users will be offered on Wednesday, October 2, from 1:00–5:00 pm.

On-site registration for all attendees will open Wednesday, October 2, at 11:00 am. The program will run until Friday, October 4, at 3:00 pm.

Omni William Penn Hotel
530 William Penn Place
Pittsburgh, PA 15219
Tel: (412) 281-7100

 Detailed agenda | Register Contact the organizers

For EARN members: Click here to access previous years’ conference materials.

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Agenda items subject to change.

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Wednesday, Oct. 2

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Registration

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  • Location: William Penn Corridor (outside the Penn Ballroom)
  • Time: Wed. 11:00 am–7:00 pm

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EARN directors’ meeting

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  • Location: Sternwheeler
  • Time: Wed. 11:30 am–4:30 pm

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Annual strategy meeting for EARN group executive directors and designated representatives. Lunch will be provided.

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Data boot camp

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  • Location: Three Rivers
  • Time: Wed. 1:00–5:00 pm
  • Training

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In this intensive, hands-on training session, EPI experts will teach participants useful quantitative techniques, statistical tools, including microdata analysis in Stata, and some key economic theory. Participants will leave with skills that they can apply immediately in their work to manipulate data in Excel and Stata. The microdata techniques presented in Stata will be applicable in other statistical software as well. Participants will learn how to use EPI’s new microdata library and learn about a variety of other useful online data sources. Participants will also learn some basic economics and econometrics, such as how to interpret regression coefficients. Note that this session will be geared toward those with at least some basic quantitative training. For those completely new to data analysis, consider attending the EARN 101 session on Friday. Lunch will be provided.

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  • Zane Mokhiber, Economic Policy Institute
  • Jhacova Williams, Economic Policy Institute / PREE
  • Ben Zipperer, Economic Policy Institute

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Dinner and welcome

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  • Location: William Penn Ballroom
  • Time: Wed. 5:00–6:00 pm

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Buffet dinner and a welcome from the conference organizers.

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  • David Cooper, Economic Policy Institute / EARN
  • Steve Herzenberg, Keystone Research Center
  • Naomi Walker, Economic Policy Institute / EARN
  • Valerie Wilson, Economic Policy Institute / PREE
  • Jaimie Worker, Economic Policy Institute / EARN

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Uniting to create an economy that works for all: A Western Pennsylvania case study

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  • Location: William Penn Ballroom
  • Time: Wed. 6:00–7:30 pm
  • Session: Plenary

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Western Pennsylvania has a hallowed tradition as a strong union region and was the birthplace of Rachel Carson. It has experienced a traumatic last four decades driven by the loss of manufacturing jobs, falling wages, rising inequality, the perpetuation and deepening of large racial economic gaps, and a seemingly unbridgeable blue–green divide. In the absence of an effective or enduring vision for unifying working people, Western Pennsylvania outside Pittsburgh has seesawed red and blue between elections and has gradually drifted conservative. This plenary will begin with an overview of the racial and class politics of the region, followed by a discussion of the practical challenges ahead: How can we create and unite behind a vision of an economically just and environmentally sustainable economy, and then achieve that vision?

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  • Moderator: Kadida Kenner, Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center
  • Lisa Frank, SEIU Healthcare Pennsylvania
  • Angel Gober, One Pennsylvania
  • Rep. Sara Innamorato, Pennsylvania House of Representatives
  • Carl Redwood, Hill District Consensus Group

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Thursday, Oct. 3

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Group run

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  • Location: Meet in hotel lobby
  • Time: Thu. 7:00 am

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Runners of all paces are encouraged to join, as are those who prefer a good walk.

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Breakfast

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  • Location: William Penn Ballroom
  • Time: Thu. 8:00–8:55 am

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Are you asking the right questions?: Critical issues at the intersection of race, ethnicity, gender, and class

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  • Location: William Penn Ballroom
  • Time: Thu. 9:00–10:30 am
  • Session: Plenary
  • PREE

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Economic inequality is rarely experienced along a single dimension. In the United States, long-established power structures defined by race, ethnicity, gender, and class all intersect to create disparate economic outcomes based on multiple layers of identity. EPI’s Program on Race, Ethnicity, and the Economy (PREE) was launched in 2008 to explore and explain how these intersections generate disparities in economic status by race and ethnicity, and to critically examine the role of policy in eliminating or perpetuating those disparities. This plenary features a discussion of important guiding principles for racial justice–oriented research and policymaking, including the importance of adequately disaggregating demographic groups, taking an intersectional approach to analyzing racial and class inequality, and remaining vigilant against overgeneralizing, which can create policy blind spots and inadvertently fuel stereotypes.

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  • Moderator: Valerie Wilson, Economic Policy Institute / PREE
  • Gbenga Ajilore, Center for American Progress
  • Eric Rodriguez, UnidosUS
  • Rhonda V. Sharpe, Women’s Institute for Science, Equity and Race (WISER)

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Workshop Session 1.1 | 10:45 am–12:00 pm

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Allies to co-conspirators: Building effective partnerships among state and local grassroots organizations, research and policy groups, and national allies

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  • Location: Sternwheeler
  • Time: Thu. 10:45 am–12:00 pm
  • Session: 1.1
  • Seminar

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Over the last decade, many EARN groups have experienced firsthand the limitations of traditional advocacy strategies when faced with political environments utterly resistant to positive policy change. These experiences have taught policy groups the necessity of building power outside the legislature—through close partnerships with grassroots groups—in order to enact change within it. This workshop will provide attendees with a range of lessons and practical tools for building effective partnerships with these groups in ways that are authentic and equitable, and build the power of directly affected people while capitalizing on the policy and research advantages EARN groups bring to the table.

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  • Moderator: Luis Eduardo Robledo, Adelante Alabama Worker Center
  • Keith Bullard, Fight for $15 / NC Raise Up
  • Allan Freyer, North Carolina Justice Center
  • Tachana Marc, Florida Policy Institute
  • Connie Razza, Center for Popular Democracy

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Getting the word out: Strategic communications to educate workers, employers, policymakers, and the public about workers’ rights

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  • Location: Three Rivers
  • Time: Thu. 10:45 am–12:00 pm
  • Session: 1.1
  • Training

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In this workshop, we will discuss the general lack of knowledge among workers and the public about labor laws and workers’ rights, and the potential impact of strategic communications on employer compliance, worker power, and policymaking. We will provide nuts-and-bolts guidance on building relationships with reporters and creating an effective media strategy.

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  • Terri Gerstein, Harvard Labor and Worklife Program
  • Matthew Johnson, Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University
  • Nancy Rankin, Community Service Society of New York
  • Juliana Feliciano Reyes, Philadelphia Inquirer

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The myth of race-neutral policymaking

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  • Location: Riverboat
  • Time: Thu. 10:45 am–12:00 pm
  • Session: 1.1
  • PREE

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By every measure of economic well-being, people of color collectively, and African Americans in particular, are at a disadvantage relative to whites. These racial disparities are the legacy of federal, state, and local policy choices that systematically excluded or severely limited opportunities for communities of color to build economic security and power. In this workshop, we will consider the role of policy in alleviating or worsening racial inequality as we discuss both universal and racially targeted solutions to racial inequality, and contemplate whether policy can ever really be race-neutral.

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  • Moderator: Valerie Wilson, Economic Policy Institute / PREE
  • Nina Banks, Bucknell University
  • Chandra Childers, Institute for Women’s Policy Research
  • Phylicia Hill, Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law

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Moving forward together to win racial and economic justice

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  • Location: William Penn Ballroom
  • Time: Thu. 12:15–2:00 pm
  • Session: Lunch plenary

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The lunch plenary will include leaders from throughout the progressive racial and economic justice movements who will offer reflections on where we’ve been, and where we are now and articulate their vision for what it will take to win economic and racial justice.

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  • Moderator: Shannan Reaze, Atlanta Jobs with Justice
  • Sanaa Abrar, United We Dream
  • Keith Bullard, Fight for $15 / NC Raise Up
  • Alma Couverthie, Community Change
  • Tanya Wallace-Gobern, National Black Worker Center Project

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Session 1.2 | 2:15–3:30 pm

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Economic justice for people and families impacted by incarceration: Eliminating employment and income barriers

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  • Location: Sternwheeler
  • Time: Thu. 2:15–3:30 pm
  • Session: 1.2
  • PREE | EARN in the South

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Mass incarceration has severe economic impacts on individuals, families, and communities that are disproportionately experienced by persons of color due to structural racism. This session explores the extreme harms of incarceration as well as policies and campaign strategies to reduce the economic barriers faced by justice-involved individuals, including bail reform and expungement legislation. We will also discuss the importance of centering the experiences of communities of color and directly impacted individuals in advocacy efforts.

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  • Moderator: Ashley Spalding, Kentucky Center for Economic Policy
  • Robynn J.A. Cox, University of Southern California
  • Kenneth Gilliam, New Virginia Majority
  • Damion Shade, Oklahoma Policy Institute

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Our homes, our future: Using rent regulations to protect renters and improve housing affordability

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  • Location: Three Rivers
  • Time: Thu. 2:15–3:30 pm
  • Session: 1.2

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Across the nation, cities are experiencing an affordable housing crisis. In response, advocates and policymakers in several states and cities have adopted rent stabilization and renter protection measures. In 2019, Oregon passed the nation’s first statewide rent cap and eviction protection bill. In California, the cities of Inglewood and Sacramento passed new rent control laws and action is pending at the state level. New Jersey’s “just cause” law uses judicial power to protect renters against capricious or discriminatory evictions. In Georgia, new legislation grants stronger protection against retaliatory evictions when renters complain about unsafe or unhealthy conditions. These efforts can provide insight for other states looking for ways to protect renters and keep housing costs in check. Though it is not a panacea for fixing America’s housing affordability challenges, rent stabilization and renter protection measures can be part of a broader agenda to address the housing crisis. This workshop will present research findings on rent stabilization, policy recommendations for addressing the housing crisis, and most importantly, narratives from tenant organizers who can provide insight into the intersection of the housing crisis with race, income, educational attainment, and immigration status.

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  • Moderator: Vanessa Carter, USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity
  • Sharona Barnes, Organize Florida
  • Shakiya Canty, One Pennsylvania
  • Amee Chew, PolicyLink

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Boilerplate at work: How employment contracts limit workers’ job mobility and rights—and what we can do about it

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  • Location: Riverboat
  • Time: Thu. 2:15–3:30 pm
  • Session: 1.2

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Employers are increasingly imposing boilerplate employment contracts on their workers, even low-wage hourly workers. These contracts may include terms such as shortened statutes of limitations that cut the time workers have to bring a legal claim, mandatory arbitration clauses that deny workers’ access to court, nondisparagement clauses that prevent workers from talking about things that happen at work, noncompetes that limit what jobs workers can take after they leave a job—the list goes on and on. This workshop will cover some common employment contract terms and the impacts of these terms on job workers’ mobility, workplace rights enforcement, and power. The workshop will also explore exciting new legislative, legal, and organizing initiatives to combat unfair employment contract terms.

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  • Moderator: Terri Gerstein, Harvard Labor and Worklife Program
  • Jane Flanagan, Chicago-Kent School of Law
  • Elizabeth Nicolas, Center for Popular Democracy
  • Vicki Tardif, Google

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Session 1.3 | 3:45–5:00 pm

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The enduring legacy of racial discrimination: Why ‘just getting over it’ is not an option

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  • Location: Sternwheeler
  • Time: Thu. 3:45–5:00 pm
  • Session: 1.3
  • PREE

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In this workshop, attendees will explore the lasting effects of long-established and stubbornly persistent racial discrimination in the United States. Attendees will hear from researchers who have made use of “unconventional” data sources to document and measure the historical legacy and contemporary impact of racial discrimination on economic outcomes and civic engagement. Discussion topics include Confederate symbols, The Negro Motorist Green Books, and Native voting barriers. The goal of this workshop is to equip attendees with information and research they can reference in developing strategies for advancing a racial and economic justice agenda that takes account of the enduring legacy of racial discrimination.

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  • Lisa Cook, Michigan State University
  • Jean Reith Schroedel, Claremont Graduate University 
  • Jhacova Williams, Economic Policy Institute / PREE

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The gig is up: Organizing campaigns with contract workers

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  • Location: Three Rivers
  • Time: Thu. 3:45–5:00 pm
  • Session: 1.3

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Employers have long structured work arrangements outside the traditional employment relationship—for example, through subcontracting, temporary and staffing agencies, franchisee models, or independent contractor arrangements—in efforts to cut costs and shed the requirements of baseline labor laws. These work structures too often drive labor standards erosion, rising income and wealth inequality, and shift power away from workers and toward corporations. They are frequently employed in low-wage sectors into which people of color have long been shunted—domestic work, delivery, janitorial and logistics, to name a few—intensifying old patterns of occupational segregation and pay inequality. Workers and their advocates have struggled to fight this trend, but recently policy and organizing have started to move the needle, particularly in the area of worker classification as independent contractors. This panel will present some of these strategies for discussion and consideration.

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  • Moderator: Rebecca Smith, National Employment Law Project
  • Alana Eichner, National Domestic Workers Alliance
  • Rachel Lauter, Working Washington / Fair Work Center
  • Ariadna Morales, Working Partnerships USA

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Saving the planet and the people

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  • Location: Riverboat
  • Time: Thu. 3:45–5:00 pm
  • Session: 1.3

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EARN groups recognize that the climate crisis is happening and that we must rapidly transform our economy if we are to preserve life on this planet. This transition must be guided by principles of racial equity and economic justice that protect, support and empower working people and highly impacted communities. Yet many EARN groups may not know how they can engage on these issues. Moreover, some groups may be wary of engaging on a set of issues that is not popular with particular constituencies with whom they work, with large portions of the public in their state/region, or with the dominant political forces. In this workshop, we will discuss efforts underway at the state and local levels to fight the climate crisis while protecting workers and their communities; we will describe some of the research and policy work supporting these efforts; and we will discuss how climate advocates have been able to build strong and diverse partnerships and coalitions to support their campaigns.

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  • Moderator: Mike Cavanaugh, Labor Network for Sustainability
  • Paul Getsos, People’s Climate Movement
  • Jacqueline Patterson, NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program
  • Laura Wiens, Pittsburghers for Public Transit

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Reception

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  • Location: Bob & Dolores Hope Room
  • Time: Thu. 5:00–6:30 pm

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Cocktail reception with light hors d’oeuvres, where EARN members can network, socialize, and reflect on the day’s sessions.

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Friday, Oct. 4

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Group run

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  • Location: Meet in hotel lobby
  • Time: Fri. 7:00 am

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Runners of all paces are encouraged to join, as are those who prefer a good walk.

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Breakfast

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  • Location: William Penn Ballroom
  • Time: Fri. 7:30–8:25 am

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Session 2.1 | 8:30–9:45 am

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Communications and messaging on racial, economic, and gender justice in the South

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  • Location: Sternwheeler
  • Time: Fri. 8:30–9:45 am
  • Session: 2.1
  • EARN in the South

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Participants will learn about communications strategies, messaging tools, and research to support racial, economic, and gender justice narratives that are particularly relevant for the Southern states, including tools for storytelling to support grassroots leadership. There will be time reserved for a robust Q&A about messaging and communications research to support narratives that respect workers and ensure equitable outcomes for families trying to make ends meet, while also confronting low wages, erosion of labor standards, and tax subsidies for corporations.

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  • Moderator: Alex Camardelle, Georgia Budget and Policy Institute
  • Marisol Bello, Community Change
  • Celinda Lake, Lake Research Partners

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New strategies to build worker power

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  • Location: Three Rivers
  • Time: Fri. 8:30–9:45 am
  • Session: 2.1

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In industries and occupations where traditional forms of organizing are challenging or unworkable, labor rights groups are employing new strategies for worker outreach and organizing that achieve many of the same goals of traditional unions. In some cases, these efforts have led to new forms of state- and municipality-based worker organizations. In this session, panelists will describe the novel strategies being used to reach new sectors of the workforce, and the ways in which these new forms of organizing increase worker power and wages. Speakers will also discuss the degree to which these new models are replicable in other industries or areas, as well as the best practices and pitfalls they have learned in the process. Panelists will further discuss broader issues around new forms of organizing, including sustainability, funding, impact, and scale.

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  • Moderator: Katherine Schwalbe, SEIU
  • Damon Di Cicco, United Steelworkers
  • Afifa Khaliq, Florida Public Services Union
  • Peter Rickman, Milwaukee Area Service and Hospitality Workers Organization
  • Tanya Wallace-Gobern, National Black Worker Center Project
  • Sage Wilson, Working Washington

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EARN 101: Intro to EARN and data resources

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  • Location: Riverboat
  • Time: Fri. 8:30–9:45 am
  • Session: 2.1
  • Training

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EARN 101 is a foundational workshop for people who are new to the network, who are new to state and local policy analysis, or who are interested in getting more mileage out of EARN’s data tools and online resources. David Cooper, deputy director of EARN, and Julia Wolfe, state economic analyst, will provide an overview of the many data packages and online tools available to EARN groups, including EARN’s new State of Working X (SWX) online data tool. They will also introduce attendees to other good data sources for state and local analyses, discuss best practices and common pitfalls when working with certain types of data (such as wage data), and introduce attendees to some key concepts and common analytical tools in Excel. Bring your data questions and laptops.

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  • Dave Cooper, Economic Policy Institute / EARN
  • Julia Wolfe, Economic Policy Institute / EARN

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Session 2.2 | 10:00–11:15 am

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Unleashing local power: Preemption campaigns, coalitions, and advancing racial and gender equity in the South

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  • Location: Sternwheeler
  • Time: Fri. 10:00–11:15 am
  • Session: 2.2
  • EARN in the South

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A nationwide trend in state preemption is leaving local leaders with a diminished ability to respond to the needs of their communities by passing progressive policies. Participants will learn about sweeping state laws that intentionally block local efforts to address many worker and racial justice issues including minimum wage, health disparities and paid sick days, local hiring, and more. Panelists will also discuss how preemption of local lawmaking particularly impacts women and people of color, and what policy and grassroots organizations can do to ensure local decision-making for economic justice.

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  • Moderator: Jonathan Lewis, Center for Public Policy Priorities
  • Felicia Griffin, Partnership for Working Families
  • Francesca Menes, Local Progress
  • Kim Milbrath, American Heart Association

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Child care and workplace demands for women’s dignity, equity, and well-being

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  • Location: Three Rivers
  • Time: Fri. 10:00–11:15 am
  • Session: 2.2

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Child care is largely left to families to figure out on their own, a policy of neglect that has burdened women as parents, workers, and caregivers. These burdens have been especially heavy among women of color for whom race or immigration status factor into precarious economic circumstances that make staying out of the labor force less of an option. Fifty years after a national universal child care bill was vetoed, child care is emerging again as a key issue on the national stage. States have the opportunity to establish models that help show the way forward. But the child care landscape is fragmented and chaotic, the political and policy circumstances are different from state to state, and the needs and interests of working families and the care workforce have not been at the front and center of policy discussions. This workshop will start with a conversation between child care researchers in two very different contexts (Massachusetts and Kansas) to surface a range of key issues that must be tackled at the state level, and then open up for audience discussion.

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  • Moderator: Elise Gould, Economic Policy Institute
  • Emily Fetsch, Kansas Action for Children
  • Sarah Jimenez, Community Labor United

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Preparing for the next recession

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  • Location: Riverboat
  • Time: Fri. 10:00–11:15 am
  • Session: 2.2

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Due to lackluster policy responses and a concerted political spin campaign to misdirect “blame,” the recovery from the Great Recession, after 11 years, has yet to reach many of the most marginalized communities in the U.S, and the human costs of massive job loss, insecurity, and economic financialization are still being felt. It is clear that previous state-level responses of budget austerity and cuts to public services and employment have kept some states from truly experiencing an economic recovery. It is more urgent than ever, with warning signs of a downturn on the horizon, to build consensus and power now—before crisis mode hits—around the policies we need to protect low- and middle-income people and ensure a robust and equitable recovery from the next recession.

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  • Moderator: Amy Hanauer, Policy Matters Ohio
  • Maurice BP-Weeks, ACRE
  • Michele Evermore, National Employment Law Project
  • Cortney Sanders, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

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Session 2.3 | 11:30 am–12:45 pm

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Schedules we can count on: How research can support fair workweek campaigns

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  • Location: Sternwheeler
  • Time: Fri. 11:30 am–12:45 pm
  • Session: 2.3

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Across the country, working people on the frontlines of America’s service economy are leading the fight for a fair workweek. From Oregon to Philadelphia, Seattle to New York City, grassroots advocates and impacted workers have successfully passed fair workweek policies. These laws guarantee people working in retail, restaurant, and other service jobs new protections from abusive scheduling practices and income volatility. In several cities where fair workweek laws have passed, research played a key role in exposing the extent of the problem, securing earned media and persuading policymakers to engage on this issue.

This panel brings together grassroots advocates who have led state and local fair workweek campaigns, as well as researchers who have partnered with local campaigns in their strategies to win. Together, panelists will (1) provide an overview of the fight for a fair workweek and explain why it is a key racial justice issue that intersects with minimum wage, overtime, and other policy fights; (2) provide local case studies on the Philadelphia, Chicago, and Connecticut campaigns that underscore the dynamic role between grassroots organizing and research in policy campaigns; and (3) provide guidance on how researchers and EARN affiliates can best engage in local campaigns and research to win.

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  • Moderator: Maggie Corser, Center for Popular Democracy
  • Alison Dickson, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
  • Lonnie Golden, Penn State University, Abington College
  • Carlos Moreno, Connecticut Working Families Organization
  • Salewa Ogunmefun, One Pennsylvania

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Transparency as a tool for worker power

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  • Location: Three Rivers
  • Time: Fri. 11:30 am–12:45 pm
  • Session: 2.3

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As the old adage goes, “sunlight is the best disinfectant.” But sunlight doesn’t only serve as a good disinfectant, it can also be a critical tool for building worker power. We know that keeping information secret from workers and the public allows employer abuses to grow undetected in the shadows. Secrecy also allows companies to become richer and more powerful without accountability.

In a push against workplace secrecy, states are increasingly using transparency as a policy tool to hold employers accountable and increase worker power by shifting control over information from employers to workers. For instance, Washington state and others are proposing and passing measures to require employers to disclose salary ranges to job applicants; seven states have banned nondisclosure agreements, and others are working to limit forced arbitration; and many localities, including Philadelphia, are working to ensure employees have advance notice of and a say in their work schedules. And as surveillance and data collection of workers becomes commonplace, working people are engaged in ensuring transparency about what is collected and how surveillance occurs.

Join us to explore the movement for workplace transparency blossoming across the country.

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  • Moderator: Sarah David Heydemann, National Women’s Law Center
  • Erin Kramer, One Pennsylvania
  • Elizabeth Nicolas, Center for Popular Democracy
  • Aisha Satterwhite, Coworker.org
  • Marilyn Watkins, Economic Opportunity Institute

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Immigrants are welcome here: State-level action for immigrant and worker rights

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  • Location: Riverboat
  • Time: Fri. 11:30 am–12:45 pm
  • Session: 2.3

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Communities around the country continue to support and fight for policies that welcome immigrants and ensure migrant workers and their family members are able to thrive despite pervasive xenophobic rhetoric, and policies and practices that discriminate and harm workers based on their immigration status. In this session, participants will hear about examples of recent state- and local-level campaigns, initiatives, and policies to support immigrant workers and economic justice. This includes action both in blue states, where more progress might be achievable, and in environments that are more hostile to immigrants. For example, in New York, new state government funding has helped refugee resettlement agencies continue doing vital work to integrate refugees into American society and the labor market. And in the South, where large Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) worksite raids are becoming more common, organizations have been cooperating to support impacted workers and families and preparing workplaces on how to respond. Other examples will be discussed and audience participation and contributions about experiences in their states will be encouraged.

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  • Moderator: Daniel Costa, Economic Policy Institute
  • Jessie Hahn, National Immigration Law Center
  • Luis Eduardo Robledo, Adelante Alabama Worker Center
  • Cyierra Roldan, Fiscal Policy Institute of New York

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Keynote address: The Hon. Keith Ellison, Minnesota Attorney General

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  • Location: William Penn Ballroom
  • Time: Fri. 1:00–2:45 pm
  • Session: Plenary

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Introduction by EPI President Thea Lee

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Presenters

Sanaa Abrar, United We Dream

Sanaa Abrar serves as the advocacy director at United We Dream (UWD), the largest immigrant youth-led network in the nation. Abrar leads the network in crafting federal, state, and local policies and advocacy campaigns that are informed by the vision shared by immigrant youth across the country. She was born in Karachi, Pakistan, and immigrated with her mother when she was three months old to reunite with her father in the United States. She shares in the UWD vision of reaching out to other sisters of color who feel isolated and ostracized by their communities, to build together, organize, and win.

Gbenga Ajilore, Center for American Progress

Olugbenga Ajilore is a senior economist at the Center for American Progress (CAP). Prior to joining CAP, Ajilore was an associate professor of economics at the University of Toledo. His research has focused on race and local public finance, peer effects and adolescent behavior, and police militarization. Ajilore’s work has been published in numerous journals, including The Review of Black Political EconomyEconomics and Human Biology, the Review of Economics of the Household, and the Atlantic Economic Journal. As of 2018, Ajilore serves as president of the National Economic Association. Ajilore received his Ph.D. in economics from Claremont Graduate University in 2002. He earned his B.A. in applied mathematics and economics from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1996.

Nina Banks, Bucknell University

Nina Banks is associate professor of economics at Bucknell University. Her publications focus on social reproduction and migrant households and the first black economist—Sadie Alexander. She serves on the boards of directors of the National Economic Association and the Economic Policy Institute. Professor Banks received her doctorate in economics from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

She is currently working on several books: a biography and an edited volume of the speeches of Sadie Alexander (Yale University Press); a manuscript titled Gender, Race, and Environmental Activism: Women of Color Working for Tomorrow (University of Toronto Press); and a book co-edited with Cecilia Conrad and Rhonda Sharpe, Black Women in the U.S. Economy: The Hardest Working Woman (Routledge).

Sharona Barnes, Organize Florida

Sharona Barnes is a mother, community leader, impacted tenant, and member of Organize Florida. She is active on rent control because she wants to ensure everyone can live comfortably in a place they call their own. She envisions a world in which people do not worry about where they will lay their heads at night or if they will be on the street. She wants to be that voice people can rely on to speak up to make sure they have housing security, especially for retirees on fixed incomes who have worked their whole lives.

Marisol Bello, Community Change

@Marisol_Bello

Marisol Bello is the director of communications for Community Change, a national social justice organization that builds the power of low-income people, especially people of color. Bello has spent a career telling the stories of those whose voices are not heard, first as a journalist and now in the nonprofit world. She hails from the Bronx, part of the first generation in her family born in this country. And yes, she’s a Yankees fan.

Hunter Blair, Economic Policy Institute

Hunter Blair joined EPI in 2016 as a budget analyst, in which capacity he researches tax, budget, and infrastructure policy. Originally from Georgia, Blair also helps staff the EARN in the South project, an initiative to lift up economic and racial justice campaigns among EARN groups and their grassroots partners in the South. He attended New York University, where he majored in math and economics. Blair received his master’s in economics from Cornell University.

Maurice BP-Weeks, ACRE

@mo87mo87

Maurice BP-Weeks is the co-executive director of ACRE. He works with community organizations and labor unions on campaigns to go on offense against Wall Street to beat back their destruction of communities of color. He was previously the campaign director of the ReFund America Project and worked as the Wall Street Accountability and Housing Justice campaigner at the Center for Popular Democracy before that. BP-Weeks serves on the Advisory Council of Black Organizing for Leadership and Dignity (BOLD). He graduated from Swarthmore College.

Keith Bullard, Fight for $15 / NC Raise Up

Keith Bullard is the organizing coordinating for the Fight for $15 in North Carolina. Since 2013, he has been a leader in the Fight for $15 movement across the South, and has led fast-food workers on strike in Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia. Bullard is originally from Detroit, Michigan, where he was a labor organizer as well as a member of the United Auto Workers.

Alex Camardelle, Georgia Budget and Policy Institute

@akcamardelle

Alex Camardelle is a senior policy analyst at the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute (GBPI), where he produces research that shows ways to reduce poverty, improve social services, and provide support for Georgia’s workforce. Prior to joining GBPI in 2018, he worked for the Annie E. Casey Foundation, where he was responsible for strengthening economic opportunity through research, grantmaking, and partnerships. The Georgia Center for Nonprofits recognized Alex as one of its 2017 “30 Under 30,” a distinction for emerging leaders who are a positive influence in Georgia’s nonprofit community. Alex graduated from the University of Alabama and holds a master’s in policy analysis and evaluation from Georgia State University, where he is pursuing a doctorate in policy studies.

Shakiya Canty, One Pennsylvania

Shakiya Canty is an applied ethicist-turned-organizer who is passionate about achieving justice for politically and economically neglected global communities. As the Philadelphia lead organizer of One Pennsylvania (One PA), she is currently working with One PA organizers, members, and community partner organizations to develop and lead a housing justice campaign for more robust and inclusive housing policies in Philadelphia—including rent control. Generally, she delights in challenging organizers to find and invest in community leaders on the periphery—community leaders who ultimately believe in themselves, collective leadership, and their power to fight and win campaigns that help to create a just political economy for all families.

Vanessa Carter, University of Southern California Program for Environmental and Regional Equity

@PERE_USC

Vanessa Carter is a senior data analyst at the USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE), where she has worked since 2008. She is particularly interested in California, racial equity, equitable urban planning, and writing for social change. She co-authored Rent Matters: What Are the Impacts of Rent Stabilization Measures? (2018) and Measures Matter: Ensuring Equitable Implementation of Los Angeles County Measures M & A (2018). She is currently working on a project to reimagine the California economy.

Mike Cavanaugh, Labor Network for Sustainability

Mike Cavanaugh joined the staff of the Labor Network for Sustainability in 2019 as a senior strategic advisor/organizer after a lifetime of working in the labor movement as an organizer and advocate for workers and their unions. A native of Chicago, Cavanaugh began working in the labor movement in 1973 as an organizer, building community and student support across the Midwest for striking garment workers. He went on to organize hospital workers, clothing and textile workers, warehouse workers, and public employees, with a focus on building labor–community alliances for social and economic justice in states throughout New England, where he eventually became the secretary-treasurer of the New England Regional Joint Board of UNITE.

After leaving his union in 1999 to accept a position at the national AFL-CIO in Washington, D.C., Cavanaugh held a number of senior positions in the AFL-CIO’s field department, working to build and strengthen the nationwide network of state federations, area and central labor councils. When the 2013 AFL-CIO Convention elected Tefere Gebre—the first immigrant, refugee, and central labor council leader to be elected to the top leadership as its executive vice president—Cavanaugh joined Gebre as his executive assistant, a position he held until retiring from the AFL-CIO in 2018.

Amee Chew, PolicyLink

@AmeeChews

Amee Chew is a research associate and Mellon-ACLS public fellow at PolicyLink. She served as lead researcher and co-author of the report Our Homes, Our Future: How Rent Control Can Build Stable, Healthy Communities, co-produced by the Center for Popular Democracy, PolicyLink, and the Right to the City Alliance. She holds a Ph.D. in American studies and ethnicity from the University of Southern California, and an A.B. in social studies and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies from Harvard College. She is currently working on a project exploring the drivers of racial inequities in housing access in California.

Chandra Childers, Institute for Women’s Policy Research

@ChandraChilders

Chandra Childers is a study director at the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR). An expert on social stratification and social and economic inequality by race and sex, Childers examines issues related to women and girls of color and job quality.

In addition to being cited in the press, including The Nation and The Atlantic, Childers has given presentations on the findings of IWPR research reports at various policy conferences. Before joining IWPR, she taught multiple undergraduate courses in sociology at Texas Tech University and the University of Washington. Courses taught include “Social Problems, Poverty and Inequality,” and “Research Practicum.” Childers completed her Ph.D. in sociology at the University of Washington. Her dissertation examined trends in racial occupational segregation by sex.

Lisa Cook, Michigan State University

@drlisadcook

Lisa Cook is a professor of economics and international relations at Michigan State University. As a Marshall Scholar, she received a second B.A. from Oxford University in philosophy, politics, and economics. Cook earned a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley. An authority on international economics, especially on the Russian economy, she has been involved in advising policymakers from the Obama administration to the Nigerian and Rwandan governments to various supranational agencies. She also works at the intersection of macroeconomics, economic history, African American history, and innovation economics.

David Cooper, Economic Policy Institute / EARN

@metaCoop

David Cooper is a senior analyst at the Economic Policy Institute and the deputy director of the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN), a national network of nearly 60 state and local policy research and advocacy organizations. He conducts both national and state-level research, with a focus on minimum wages, wage theft, employment and unemployment, poverty, and wage and income trends. Cooper’s analyses on the impact of minimum wage laws have been used by policymakers and advocates in city halls and statehouses across the country, as well as in Congress and the White House. He has testified in many states and cities on the challenges facing low-wage workers and their families, and has been interviewed and cited by numerous local and national media, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, CNBC, and NPR.

Maggie Corser, Center for Popular Democracy

Maggie Corser conducts research at the Center for Popular Democracy (CPD) that advances Wall Street accountability, immigrant justice, and workers’ rights campaigns. Prior to CPD, she worked at Amnesty International and the Open Society Foundations. Corser has a background in community-based participatory research and spent several years doing field research on health disparities. Her published research has been cited by numerous media outlets including The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, NPR, Forbes, Vox, and USA Today. Maggie holds a B.A. in international relations from Michigan State University and a masters in international affairs with a human rights concentration from The New School.

Daniel Costa, Economic Policy Institute

@costadaniel

Daniel Costa is the director of immigration law and policy research at the Economic Policy Institute. His areas of research include a wide range of labor migration issues, including governance of temporary labor migration programs, both high- and less-skilled migration, worksite enforcement, immigrant workers’ rights, and global multilateral processes related to migration, as well as refugee and asylum issues. He has testified on immigration before Congress and state governments, been quoted by a number of news outlets, and appeared on radio and television news, and his commentaries have appeared in various publications. Costa holds degrees from the University of California, Berkeley; Syracuse University; and Georgetown University.

Alma Couverthie, Community Change

Alma Couverthie is the deputy field director at Community Change.

Robynn J.A. Cox, University of Southern California

@RobynnCox

Robynn J.A. Cox is an assistant professor at the USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work. Her research interests primarily focus on understanding the impact of incarceration on individuals, families, and society across the life course. In academic year 2018–2019, Cox was a visiting scholar in the Opportunity and Inclusive Growth Institute at the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis and a Kelso Fellow at the Rutgers School of Management and Labor Relations. She also received a grant from the Washington Center for Equitable Growth to investigate the effects of California’s Proposition 47 on labor market outcomes of low-skilled minorities.

Damon Di Cicco, United Steelworkers

Damon Di Cicco is the president of United Steelworkers Local 1088 in Pittsburgh, and is working to organize independent contractors in the tech industry.

Alison Dickson, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Alison Dickson joined the Labor Education Program (LEP) in January 2011 and works as an instructor and researcher in the Project for Middle Class Renewal at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (UIC). In this capacity, she directs and teaches for the Worker Rights Project, a LEP initiative that provides bilingual (Spanish–English) workers’ rights training for immigrant and other low-wage workers. In addition to her teaching, she conducts applied and scholarly research that focuses on workers, workplaces, and economic development. Prior to joining LEP, Dickson worked at the UIC Center for Urban Economic Development (CUED) where she contributed to a landmark 2008 study of low-wage workers, industries, and occupations in America’s three largest cities. Before her time at CUED, she worked for a number of years as a community and labor organizer in Ohio and Los Angeles. Dickson received her master’s degree in urban planning and policy from the University of Illinois at Chicago and her bachelor’s degree in International Affairs and Economic Development from the George Washington University in Washington, D.C. She has also spent time studying and living in Nicaragua and Cuba.

Alana Eichner, National Domestic Workers Alliance

@AlanaEichner

As policy manager at the National Domestic Workers Alliance (NDWA), Alana Eichner builds support for and advances NDWA’s federal policy priorities. Prior to NDWA, Eichner served as the senior associate for early childhood success at the National League of Cities. There she provided technical assistance to municipal leaders to implement early childhood education policies and programs. She has previously worked in women’s public policy advocacy as the program assistant for income security and education at the National Women’s Law Center and served as a field organizer on President Obama’s reelection campaign. She holds a B.A. in government from Smith College.

The Hon. Keith Ellison, Minnesota Attorney General

@keithellison

Keith Ellison was sworn in as Minnesota’s 30th attorney general on January 7, 2019. From 2007 to 2019, he represented Minnesota’s 5th Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives, where he championed consumer, worker, environmental, and civil- and human-rights protections for Minnesotans. He served for 12 years on the House Financial Services Committee, where he helped oversee the financial services industry, the housing industry, and Wall Street, among others. Among his legislative accomplishments are passing provisions to protect credit card holders from abusive practices and protect the rights of renters and tenants. While in Congress, he founded the Congressional Antitrust Caucus and the Congressional Consumer Justice Caucus. He also served as co-chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, which he helped build to more than 100 members.

Before being elected to Congress, Attorney General Ellison served four years in the Minnesota House of Representatives. Prior to entering elective office, he spent 16 years as an attorney specializing in civil rights and defense law, including five years as executive director of the Legal Rights Center. As the leader of this public-interest law firm, he oversaw a team of attorneys focused on delivering justice for Minnesotans who had nowhere else to turn. He was also a noted community activist.

Attorney General Ellison received his law degree from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1990. He is the proud father of four adult children: Isaiah, Jeremiah, Elijah, and Amirah. He is the first African American and the first Muslim American to be elected to statewide office in Minnesota.

Michele Evermore, National Employment Law Project

@EvermoreMichele

Michele Evermore joined the National Employment Law Project (NELP) in 2018 as a senior policy analyst for social insurance. She has worked to promote worker power as a legislative advocate for labor unions, including the Service Employees International Union District 1199 New England and National Nurses United. She also worked for the Obama Department of Labor to advance sound benefits policy, employment policy for people with disabilities, and equal pay for equal work. Prior to that, she worked in Congress for a decade, primarily for Senator Tom Harkin and also for the House Committee on Education and the Workforce. In those roles, she worked to advance worker protections, organizing rights, and improved retirement security in a variety of private pension plan designs and Social Security.

Emily Fetsch, Kansas Action for Children

@EmilyKansas

Emily Fetsch is the director of policy and research at Kansas Action for Children and its Kansas Center for Economic Growth project. Previously, she was a researcher at the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation and the Public Religion Research Institute and the associate director at the National Religious Partnership for the Environment. Fetsch holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of St. Thomas and a master’s degree in political science from the University of Kansas.

Jane Flanagan, Chicago-Kent School of Law

@Jane_R_Flanagan

Jane Flanagan is a Leadership in Government Fellow with the Open Society Foundations and a visiting scholar at Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago-Kent School of Law. She is the former chief of the Workplace Rights Bureau within the Illinois Attorney General’s Office, a bureau she founded and led until late 2018. Previously, Flanagan was an assistant attorney general in Maryland and legal counsel to Maryland’s Division of Labor and Industry. She began her career in private practice litigating collective and class action cases on behalf of employees, including chicken-processing workers and bus drivers. Flanagan is a graduate of Wesleyan University and Northeastern University School of Law.

Lisa Frank, SEIU Healthcare Pennsylvania

@LisaF_SEIU

Lisa Frank has worked for two decades to improve the lives of health care workers by helping them form unions and collectively bargain for better wages, better benefits, and fairness in the workplace. She has also been at the forefront of efforts in Pittsburgh to forge stronger links among community, labor, faith, and environmental organizations to advance the vision of a community and economy that work for all people.

Allan Freyer, Workers’ Rights Project at North Carolina Justice Center

@AllanFreyer

Allan Freyer is the director of workers’ rights at the North Carolina Justice Center, where he oversees the Center’s policy and campaign efforts aimed at helping North Carolina’s low-wage workers earn higher wages, receive adequate health and safety protections, and access crucial work–family supports, such as paid leave and unemployment insurance. He also has extensive experience writing and advocating for smarter, more equitable economic development policies. Before joining the Justice Center in 2011, he worked as a policy adviser for three members of Congress and as an economic development consultant to universities and local governments. He has a bachelor’s degree in political science from Duke University and a master’s and Ph.D. in city and regional planning from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, which makes basketball season confusing.

Terri Gerstein, Harvard Labor and Worklife Program

@TerriGerstein

Terri Gerstein is the director of the State and Local Enforcement Project at the Harvard Labor and Worklife Program. She recently completed an Open Society Foundations Leadership in Government Fellowship. Previously, she worked for over 17 years in New York state government, including as the labor bureau chief in the attorney general’s office and as a deputy commissioner in the labor department. Before that, Gerstein worked at nonprofit organizations in Miami and co-hosted a Spanish-language radio show on workers’ rights. Her writing has appeared in a variety of publications including The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Guardian, The Hill, The Nation, and The American Prospect. She is a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School.

Paul Getsos, People’s Climate Movement

@PaulGGetsos

Paul Getsos is the national coordinator for the People’s Climate Movement. He works to expand participation by everyday people in the decisions impacting their lives and their communities. Over the past four years, he has worked at the intersection of the new vibrant social movement formations addressing racial and economic inequality. He served as the national coordinator of the People’s Climate March, and is continuing in that role to build a national multisector movement working on climate change. The co-author of an award-winning and widely used book, Tools for Radical Democracy, Getsos, through his work, has expanded participation by everyday people in a variety of forums. He has innovated new tools drawing from the rich history of efforts to address inequality through greater civic participation, civil rights organizing, and community-building techniques developed in the United States and abroad, as well as his own experience in the electoral, movement-building, and organization-building arenas.

Kenneth Gilliam, New Virginia Majority

Kenneth Gilliam is a proud native Virginian who is deeply committed to advancing public policies that create opportunities and improve the lives of working-class communities of color. Prior to joining New Virginia Majority, he served as the campaign engagement manager for The Commonwealth Institute for Fiscal Analysis (TCI). He was a key contributor to TCI’s work to advance opportunity and reduce inequity through changes in education and health care policy. Most notably, he helped lead the successful Medicaid Expansion campaign for the Healthcare for All Virginians Coalition—a statewide coalition of more than 110 organizations. Additionally, he served on a national advisory committee for two years with the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities to provide training, support, and technical assistance for outreach and campaign staff in the State Priorities Partnership. Before joining the Institute, Kenneth worked as a higher education professional at Old Dominion University and served as a Southern Education Leadership Initiative fellow with the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute in Atlanta, Georgia. He has a master’s degree in higher education from Indiana University, Bloomington, and a B.A. from James Madison University.

Angel Gober, One Pennsylvania

@angeldaguard 

Angel Gober is the Western Pennsylvania director of One Pennsylvania (One PA). In this role, she is also taking on the Environmental and Economic Justice campaigns of One PA. Gober started 15 years ago building a tenants’ union in public housing where she lived with her daughter. Since then she has been a fearless community organizer, working on housing and education justice. She has been a winning campaign manager for local school board campaigns and has co-authored policy to stop the school-to-prison pipeline. Gober envisions and strategically works towards a world that is resourced and beautiful for black children. She is dedicated to statewide and national coalitions to make change.

Lonnie Golden, Penn State University, Abington College

@lonniegolden5

Lonnie Golden is a professor of economics at Penn State Abington. His research interests include economics of work hours, work schedules, workplace flexibility, overwork, student employment, contingent employment, time use, and worker well-being. He has had many journal articles published, focusing on overwork and worker well-being.

Elise Gould, Economic Policy Institute

@eliselgould

Elise Gould is a senior economist at the Economic Policy Institute (EPI). Her research areas include wages, poverty, inequality, economic mobility, and health care. She is a co-author of The State of Working America, 12th Edition. Gould authored a chapter on health in The State of Working America 2008/09; co-authored a book on health insurance coverage in retirement; has published in venues such as The Chronicle of Higher Education, Challenge Magazine, and Tax Notes; and has written for academic journals including Health Economics, Health Affairs, Journal of Aging and Social Policy, Risk Management & Insurance Review, Environmental Health Perspectives, and International Journal of Health Services.

Felicia Griffin, Partnership for Working Families

Felicia Griffin is the Partnership for Working Families’ deputy director. She is responsible for strengthening and expanding the network’s membership, supporting the leadership development of network staff and affiliates, developing emerging programs, campaigns, and strategies that ensure that its local campaigns and organizing add up to building state power. Prior to joining the Partnership, Griffin was the executive director of the Partnership’s Colorado affiliate, United for a New Economy. Since 2002, she has worked with labor and community partners on many campaigns, including increasing Colorado’s state minimum wage, increasing Medicaid enrollment for 80,000 children in New Mexico, passing statewide wage theft protection legislation in Colorado, and increasing local funding for affordable housing (to $150 million) in Denver. She has a deep commitment to racial justice, and all the work she does has a goal of reducing disparities for low-income workers and communities of color.

Jessie Hahn, National Immigration Law Center

@hahn_jessie

Jessie Hahn works for the National Immigration Law Center (NILC), one of the leading organizations in the U.S. exclusively dedicated to defending and advancing the rights of immigrants with low income. At NILC, she engages in legislative and administrative advocacy focused on protecting and expanding the rights of low-wage immigrant workers. She also provides legal counsel and strategic advice to support immigrant worker advocates around the country on legal and policy matters affecting immigrants in the workplace.

Amy Hanauer, Policy Matters Ohio

@amyhanauer

Amy Hanauer is the founding executive director of Policy Matters Ohio, which creates a more equitable, vibrant, and inclusive Ohio through research and policy advocacy. She has a master’s from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and a B.A. from Cornell. Before starting Policy Matters in 2000, Hanauer did policy work in Wisconsin, Colorado, and Washington, D.C. She brings insight to economic, racial, and social justice and to reducing mass incarceration and addressing climate change. Hanauer serves in leadership roles for the think tank Demos Action, the national Economic Analysis and Research Network, and the national State Priorities Partnership. She also helps steer Ohio Voice and several economic vitality efforts in Cleveland. In an important swing state, Hanuaer provides a passionate voice about how to make an economy that works for all.

Steve Herzenberg, Keystone Research Center

Steve Herzenberg is the executive director of the Keystone Research Center (KRC), a Pennsylvania-based, independent, nonpartisan economic research and policy organization, which also houses the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center. Herzenberg holds a Ph.D. in economics from MIT. His research has focused on the U.S. and global auto industry; the rise of the service-dominated new economy; the challenges unions face adapting to the new economy; workforce development; economic development; industry studies, including early childhood education, long-term care, manufacturing, and construction; and state policy issues generally. His writings for KRC are available at www.keystoneresearch.org, including The State of Working Pennsylvania, published annually since 1996. His publications for national audiences include Losing Ground in Early Childhood Education (Economic Policy Institute, 2005); New Rules for a New Economy: Employment and Opportunity in Postindustrial America (Cornell/ILR press, 1998); and U.S.-Mexico Trade: Pulling Together or Pulling Apart? (Office of Technology Assessment, United States Congress, September 1992).

Before joining Keystone, Herzenberg taught at Rutgers University and worked at the U.S. Congressional Office of Technology Assessment and the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL). At DOL, he served as assistant to the chief negotiator of the labor side agreement to the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Sarah David Heydemann, National Women’s Law Center

@sdavidh

At the National Women’s Law Center, Sarah Heydemann works at the intersection of gender justice and labor rights, engaging in state and federal policy advocacy and litigating on issues such as sexual harassment, equal pay, and pregnancy discrimination. Most recently, she practiced union-side labor and employment law at a firm solely representing unions and workers. Before law school, Heydemann was an organizer with, among other organizations, the National Guestworker Alliance, DC Jobs with Justice, and UNITE HERE Local 25, leading campaigns to support low-wage workers across multiple industries. Heydemann earned her B.A. in English from Georgetown University, where she organized on behalf of campus workers, and her law degree from Northeastern University School of Law.

Phylicia Hill, Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law

@phyliciahhill

Phylicia H. Hill serves as counsel with the Economic Justice Project for the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. Her work focuses on challenging systemic discrimination in employment and minimizing barriers to community reintegration for African Americans and other racial and ethnic minorities with criminal histories. She is responsible for addressing collateral consequences in employment through the Records Assistance Program, which provides pro bono legal assistance to seal, expunge, or correct criminal records. She also addresses workplace harassment issues, pay equity issues, and other issues impacting economic dignity through her work in community engagement and outreach, policy advocacy, and litigation.

Rep. Sara Innamorato, Pennsylvania House of Representatives

@RepInnamorato

Sara Innamorato believes in a Pennsylvania for all its residents, a state in which working families don’t live paycheck to paycheck and health and well-being are more important than corporate interests. Representing the 21st Legislative District, Innamorato’s initiatives always put people first. Serving on the House Health, Transportation, and Urban Affairs Committee, she is committed to health care justice, access to affordable housing, and public transit expansion for Pennsylvanians. In the 2019–2020 legislative session, she will focus on securing democracy by introducing automatic voter registration legislation, pushing forth commonsense solutions to save lives in the opioid crisis, and fighting for a fair-share tax system.

Janea Jamison, The Power Coalition for Equity and Justice

Janea Jamison manages all programming activities for the Power Coalition. Her work includes the statewide growth of the Power Coalition and the implementation of core programming including She Leads!, the Coalition’s leadership program for female leaders of color; its Black Men and Boys Statewide work; and its policy/advocacy work. She also oversees the Power Coalition for Equity and Justice Census work including conducting research, work planning, convening, programming, and evaluation. She spends much of her time volunteering for nonprofits such as the Butterfly Society, St. Vincent De Paul, Big Buddy Program, and Dream Works Louisiana. She is a 2019 BOLD (Black Organizing for Leadership & Dignity) fellow and also a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Jamison earned her B.A. in political science from Southern University and A&M College, where she also received a master’s degree in public administration.

Sarah Jimenez, Community Labor United

Sarah Jimenez is a senior researcher with Community Labor United (CLU) in Boston. She received an M.A. in urban and environmental policy and planning from Tufts University. In her five years at CLU as a movement research generalist, Jimenez has supported campaigns concerning wage and hour violations, public transportation fare structures, local short-term rental policies, climate change and the transition to a clean energy democracy, and care labor and universal child care. She is also interested in solidarity economy, grassroots-driven research methods, contemplative practice, and storytelling.

Matthew Johnson, Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University

@mslater_johnson

Matthew Johnson is an assistant professor in the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University. Through his research, he seeks to understand how public policy can effectively improve working conditions and job quality in the U.S. He has received funding from The Arnold Foundation and the U.S. Department of Labor for research projects examining how workplace health and safety regulatory interventions affect firms and workers, as well as funding from the Russell Sage Foundation for research investigating labor-market effects of noncompete agreements. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Boston University, and his B.A. in economics and history from the University of California, Berkeley.

Kadida Kenner, Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center

@kadidakenner

A West Chester, Pa. native and Temple University grad, Kadida Kenner was a writer, producer, and director for ESPNU in Charlotte, N.C., and worked as a field and digital organizer in North Carolina in the 2016 elections. Now back in Pennsylvania, she serves as director of campaigns for Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center (PBPC), including We The People-PA (WTP-PA) and Why Courts Matter-PA. The WTP-PA agenda was created from the ground up, by people who came together in meetings across Pennsylvania. WCM-PA advocates to ensure our federal courts are filled with diverse, independent, well-qualified, mainstream jurists.

Erin Kramer, One Pennsylvania (One PA)

@ErinEKramer

Erin Kramer is the executive director of One PA. She has been in community and union organizing for nearly 20 years. In a previous role at the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), Erin helped organize Head Start workers in West Virginia, defended the retirement benefits of long-standing members in Mahoning Valley, and led the representation of health care systems across three states.

Kramer is dedicated to developing leadership of One PA’s members and team, and expanding roots for permanent progressive infrastructure in Pennsylvania.

Celinda Lake, Lake Research Partners

@celindalake

Celinda Lake is one of the Democratic Party’s leading political strategists, serving as tactician and senior advisor to the national party committees, dozens of Democratic incumbents, and challengers at all levels of the electoral process. Lake and her firm are known for cutting-edge research on issues including the economy, health care, the environment and education, and have worked for a number of institutions including the Democratic National Committee (DNC), the Democratic Governors Association (DGA), AFL-CIO, SEIU, Communications Workers of America (CWA), Intl. Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF), Sierra Club, NARAL Pro-Choice America, Human Rights Campaign, Planned Parenthood, The Next Generation, EMILY’s List, VoteVets Action Fund, and the Kaiser Family Foundation. Her international work has included work in Liberia, Haiti, Ukraine, South Africa, and Central America. In 2008, Lake worked as pollster for Vice President Joe Biden.

Rachel Lauter, Working Washington / Fair Work Center

@RachelLauter

Rachel Lauter is the executive director of Working Washington/Fair Work Center, a Seattle-based workers’ rights organization. Under her leadership, Working Washington/Fair Work Center has emerged as a national leader in organizing workers in the gig economy and in the effort to expand overtime protections. Lauter previously served as the deputy chief of staff and director of appointments for Mayor Bill de Blasio in New York City. Prior to that, she served as an assistant counsel to New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and as a law clerk. She is a graduate of Brown University and Harvard Law School, where she served as president of the Harvard Legal Aid Bureau.

Thea Lee, Economic Policy Institute

@TheaLeeEPI

Thea Mei Lee is the president of the Economic Policy Institute (EPI). Before coming to EPI at the end of 2017, she served as deputy chief of staff at the AFL-CIO. Lee joined the AFL-CIO in 1997 as chief international economist, then assumed the role of policy director before becoming deputy chief of staff.  Prior to her years at the AFL-CIO, Lee worked as an international trade economist at EPI and as an editor at Dollars & Sense magazine in Boston. She holds a bachelor’s degree in economics from Smith College and a master’s degree in economics from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Lee is co-author of A Field Guide to the Global Economy, published by the New Press, and has authored numerous publications on the North American Free Trade Agreement, the impact of international trade on U.S. wage inequality, and the domestic steel and textile industries. She has been a voice for workers in testimony before congressional committees and in television and radio appearances, including on PBS News Hour, CNN, Good Morning America, NPR’s All Things ConsideredMarketplace, and the PBS documentary Commanding Heights.

Tachana Marc, Florida Policy Institute

Tachana J. Marc works at the Florida Policy Institute, where she focuses on criminal justice reform and affordable housing policies. In her role, Marc works with researchers, advocates, and directly impacted communities to propose and advocate for effective policy solutions to overhaul Florida’s decades of “tough on crime” laws. She has written several publications calling for reforms such as raising the minimum theft felony threshold, stopping the prosecuting of children as adults, eliminating mandatory time served, and more. Currently, she is working with national partners to examine the prevalence of court fines and fees in Florida and their economic impact on communities of color. Before joining the Institute, Tachana worked as a Google Public Policy Fellow. Marc holds a master’s degree in public policy from the Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan. She received her bachelor’s degrees in political science and criminology from the University of Florida.

Francesca Menes, Local Progress

Prior to joining Local Progress as the Florida state coordinator, Francesca Menes served as the director of policy and advocacy for the Florida Immigrant Coalition (FLIC) and political director for FLIC Votes, where she led the development and implementation of strategic legislative, policy, and voter engagement campaigns locally and statewide. She co-coordinated the Florida Wage Theft Task Force, which led to the passage of ordinances in several counties throughout the state. In 2014, she successfully led a statewide campaign to establish in-state tuition for undocumented students and a campaign to create the Office of New Americans of Miami-Dade County, a public-private partnership to promote naturalization.

Menes is a co-founder of the Black Immigration Network, serves on the Miami-Dade County Community Action Agency Executive Board, and serves on other organizational boards. Most recently, she was elected the youngest treasurer of the Florida Democratic Party. She graduated from Florida International University, earning her B.A. in political science and women’s studies and her master’s in public administration, with a certificate in community development. She was born and raised in Miami’s Little Haiti community.

Kim Milbrath, American Heart Association

Kim Milbrath serves as a state and community advocacy manager for the Voices for Healthy Kids Initiative which is a partnership between the American Heart Association (AHA) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. In addition to providing Voices for Healthy Kids grantees with technical assistance and strategic campaign consultation, she also serves as the content lead on food access issues, providing consultation to AHA affiliates across the country on their Healthy Food Financing, Corner Store initiatives, SNAP incentives programs, and preemption.

Zane Mokhiber, Economic Policy Institute

@zanemokhiber

Zane Mokhiber joined the Economic Policy Institute (EPI) in 2016. As a data analyst, he supports the research of EPI’s economists on topics such as wages, labor markets, inequality, trade and manufacturing, and economic growth. Prior to joining EPI, Mokhiber worked for the Worker Institute at Cornell University as an undergraduate research fellow.

Ariadna Morales, Working Partnerships USA

@GigWorkersRise

Ariadna Morales joined Silicon Valley-based Working Partnerships USA in 2015, organizing community members around immigration reform and playing a key role in signature gathering for the Opportunity to Work Initiative—the first of its kind in the country. Since then, Morales has led ground efforts in organizing marginalized communities across three cities through campaigns such as the Primary Care Access Program, Medi-Cal Kids Expansion, and the Schools and Communities First Initiative, a groundbreaking initiative to reform commercial property taxes. Morales is leading a field team of Uber and Lyft drivers in the expansion of their base across five regions within California through the Gig Workers Rising platform.

Carlos Moreno, Connecticut Working Families

Carlos Moreno is the deputy director of the Connecticut Working Families Party and its grassroots arm, the Working Families Organization. He has over 14 years of experience in organizing, communications strategy, leading policy and legislative campaigns, and advocacy in the areas of immigrant rights, workers’ rights, and public health. Recently, he helped lead legislative campaigns that won new protections for undocumented immigrants, as well as passage of a $15 minimum wage and paid family and medical leave. He currently leads legislative and campaign strategy for Connecticut’s Fair Work Week campaign.

Elizabeth Nicolas, Center for Popular Democracy

Elizabeth (Liz) Nicolas is a staff attorney for the Center for Popular Democracy (CPD) Worker Justice team. She works on CPD’s campaigns to enact and enforce strong workplace protections. Nicolas also supports CPD’s partners and allies on low-wage worker protections, organizing, and collective action. Before joining CPD, Liz litigated wage theft, discrimination, and harassment cases on behalf of low-wage workers. She also provided legal support to the Rochester Worker Center and other local community groups. Nicolas is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and the Drexel University School of Law and lives outside of Rochester, N.Y.

Salewa Ogunmefun, One Pennsylvania

Salewa Ogunmefun is a Nigerian-American social justice organizer with a passion for building black political power. With nearly a decade of experience leading and implementing campaigns and field programs in over 10 states, she joined the One Pennsylvania team as political director in 2016, building with workers to launch the Fair Work Week campaign in Philadelphia.

Jacqueline Patterson, NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program

@JacquiPatt

Jacqueline Patterson is the director of the NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program. Since 2007, Patterson has served as coordinator and co-founder of Women of Color United. Patterson has worked as a researcher, program manager, coordinator, advocate, and activist working on women‘s rights, violence against women, HIV/AIDS, racial justice, economic justice, and environmental and climate justice. Patterson served as a senior women’s rights policy analyst for ActionAid where she integrated a women’s rights lens into the analysis of issues of food rights, macroeconomics, climate change, and the intersection of violence against women and HIV/AIDS. Previously, she served as assistant vice president of HIV/AIDS Programs for IMA World Health, providing management and technical assistance to medical facilities and programs in 23 countries in Africa and the Caribbean. Patterson served as the outreach project associate for the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, and research coordinator for Johns Hopkins University. She also served as a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer in Jamaica, West Indies.

Nancy Rankin, Community Service Society of New York

@narankin

Nancy Rankin is vice president for policy research and advocacy at Community Service Society (CSS), a leading anti-poverty organization in New York City. She heads CSS’s work on labor, transit, housing, and income inequality, using rigorous research to drive policy change. Rankin was the chief architect of the Fair Fares campaign, winning half-price subway and bus fares for the poor. As one of the leaders of the successful fights for paid sick days in New York City and paid family leave statewide, Rankin is committed to tracking policy impacts to make sure that low-wage workers are benefiting. In 2002, she founded the Unheard Third, an annual survey that elevates the views of low-income New Yorkers in the policy debate. A graduate of Cornell, she received her M.P.A. from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton.

Connie Razza, Center for Popular Democracy

@ConnieRazza

Connie Razza oversees the Center for Popular Democracy’s (CPD’s) broad-ranging campaigns for economic justice and a robust, inclusive democracy, as well as the organization’s research efforts. She previously served as as vice president of policy and research at Demos, where she directed the work of the policy team and developed a social exclusion framework for understanding the drivers of racism in the U.S. Prior to joining Demos, she was CPD’s campaign director and research director. Razza has worked for economic and racial justice for nearly a quarter century, as a union activist, organizer, researcher, policy analyst, and strategist. She holds a B.A. from Georgetown University and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Razza has written a number of publications, including an analysis for the Economic Policy Institute about planning for the next recession, and a report for Demos about social exclusion and the interplay between economic disadvantage, democratic disqualification, and social deprivation.

Shannan Reaze, Atlanta Jobs with Justice

Shannan Reaze is the executive director of Atlanta Jobs with Justice (JwJ), a coalition of faith, community, labor, and student organizations committed to economic justice. Reaze has been organizing workers and communities across the South for the last 15 years. Most recently, she worked to pass ban-the-box policies in nine municipalities across Georgia. Atlanta Jobs with Justice is currently focused on raising Georgia’s minimum wage and winning $15 minimum wages in both public- and private-sector workspaces. In 2016, Atlanta JwJ won a $14.90 base wage for Fulton County workers and in 2017 won a $15 per hour base wage for City of Atlanta workers. Atlanta JwJ is also building a vibrant civic engagement arm for working families in Georgia. Reaze is committed to winning economic justice that addresses historical disparities of race, class, gender, geography, sexual orientation, and ethnic origins.

Carl Redwood, Hill District Consensus Group

Carl Redwood Jr. serves as chair of the Hill District Consensus Group and has participated in community organizing on the local, national, and international levels since the 1970s, including with many Pittsburgh groups. He served as campaign coordinator for the 1984 Jesse Jackson for President campaign. In the 1990s, he served as associate director of Hill House and program director at Kingsley House. He helped form the Hill District Consensus Group and was involved in the development of community computer labs and internet access centers in Pittsburgh neighborhoods. He has taught community organizing at the Pitt School of Social Work since 1991.

Juliana Feliciano Reyes, Philadelphia Inquirer

@juliana_f_reyes

Juliana Feliciano Reyes is a reporter at the Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News who covers work and labor. A three-time Philadelphia News Award winner, she previously covered the Philadelphia tech scene for Technical.ly, and her writing has appeared in The Washington Post and WIRED. She’s the president of the Philadelphia chapter of the Asian American Journalists Association and a prolific letter writer.

Peter Rickman, Milwaukee Area Service and Hospitality Workers Organization

Peter Rickman is the president of the Milwaukee Area Service and Hospitality Workers Organization (MASH). MASH combines the functions of union, hiring hall, and worker center while working to build sectoral bargaining among service and hospitality workers. MASH is dedicated to fighting for economic and racial justice. Prior to founding MASH as a new form of worker organization, Rickman led winning campaigns to win unions, living wage laws, and community benefits agreements. He has been a union organizer and researcher, a rank-and-file activist, and has held various elected union officer roles.

Luis Eduardo Robledo, Adelante Alabama Worker Center

@Inquiro7

Luis Eduardo Robledo is a labor and immigrant rights activist based in Birmingham, Alabama. A native of Colombia, he came to the U.S. with his family as a child. He began his movement work in 2011 as an interpreter and translator during the implementation of america’s harshest immigration law, Alabama’s HB 56. His current work centers on the intersection of labor, immigrant, racial, and language justice. He is the economic justice organizer for Adelante Alabama Worker Center. He is heavily involved in local campaigns to confront the relationship of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and the police, to reinforce worker power and recover stolen wages, to establish a language justice initiative in Birmingham, and to build a collaborative community defense network to fight against ICE’s kidnappings.

Eric Rodriguez, UnidosUS

Eric Rodriguez, UnidosUS senior vice president, oversees the office of policy and advocacy, which is charged with directing the organization’s legislative affairs, public policy research, policy analysis, and field advocacy work. He is responsible for the UnidosUS federal and state legislative priorities and agendas. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., UnidosUS is the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States. Through its network of nearly 300 affiliated community-based organizations, UnidosUS reaches millions of Hispanics each year in 41 states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia.

Cyierra Roldan, Fiscal Policy Institute of New York

Cyierra Roldan is a policy analyst for the Fiscal Policy Institute of New York’s (FPI’s) Immigration Research Initiative. Prior to working at FPI, she was a dedicated advocate for many groups across Colgate University’s campus, including students of color, and was designated a Lavender graduate for being a dedicated ally to the LGBTQ community. Roldan worked as a research assistant on a study of students who were the first in their families to go to college; she was a member of the university’s Intergroup Dialogue Advisory Board, which strove for diversity and inclusivity in the academic and social sphere; and she presented an honor’s thesis on intergroup dialogue.

Cortney Sanders, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

@Cort_Sand

Cortney Sanders joined the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities in 2017 as a State Policy Fellow for the State Fiscal Project (SFP). Prior to joining SFP, she worked for Poverty Solutions in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and at the Aspen Institute as a William Randolph Hearst Fellow. Sanders’s research experience includes topics on racial equity, social welfare reform, voting rights, tax and economic policy, and education equity. She has used her expertise in diversity, equity, and inclusion to analyze policies affecting people of color and economically disadvantaged communities. Sanders holds a bachelor’s degree in government from the University of Texas, Austin, and a master’s in public policy from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Aisha Satterwhite, Coworker.org

@smarttechgirl

Aisha Satterwhite is the founder and managing director of Coworker.org. Satterwhite leads Coworker’s team of digital strategists, technologists, and organizers in supporting workers through the organization’s platform, and guiding work at the intersection of digital strategies and the labor movement. Satterwhite is an executive-level leader and strategist in the areas of digital transformation, advocacy, and team management. Most recently, she served as managing director for the D.C. office at Blue State Digital, a global digital agency. She has also led digital and communications programs at The Africa Fund (as a Ford Foundation fellow), One Economy Corporation, Service Employees International Union, the National Education Association, and the Human Rights Campaign.

Jean Reith Schroedel, Claremont Graduate University

Jean Schroedel is the Thornton F. Bradshaw Chair in the Department of Politics & Government at Claremont Graduate University. She teaches classes on American political development, voting rights, women and the law, women and policy, and Congress and policymaking. Schroedel earned her B.A. in political science from the University of Washington in 1981 and a Ph.D. in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1990. Schroedel has spent much of the past several years researching the impact of the Voting Rights Act on the ability of Native Americans to have meaningful access to the ballot box.

Katherine Schwalbe, Service Employees International Union

Katherine Schwalbe is a senior policy specialist with the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), focusing on labor and economic policy. A former SEIU member herself, she is excited about opportunities to change the landscape for working people. She lives in New York City and in her spare time can often be found in graduate school or cheering on her hapless Metsies. This is her first EARN conference.

Damion Shade, Oklahoma Policy Institute

@shade_damion

Damion Shade serves as a criminal justice policy analyst at the Oklahoma Policy Institute (OK Policy). He grew up in Jackson, Mississippi, and has lived in Oklahoma since the late 1990s. Prior to joining OK Policy, he was an educator, and he has written education and justice features as a contributing writer for the Tulsa Voice. He has won awards for general news reporting and feature writing from the Society of Professional Journalists. Shade earned a bachelor’s degree from Oral Roberts University and started several voter registration and political advocacy initiatives during his time on campus. He lives in Tulsa with his wife, Rachel.

Rhonda Vonshay Sharpe, Women’s Institute for Science, Equity and Race

@RhondaVSharpe

Rhonda Vonshay Sharpe is the founder and president of the Women’s Institute for Science, Equity and Race. Her research focuses on three areas: gender and racial inequality; the diversity of STEM education; and the demography of higher education. She is the co-editor of The Review of Black Political Economy and serves on the boards of the International Association of Feminist Economists and Diversifying and Decolonizing Economics. Sharpe’s research has been featured in The New York Times and she is a recurring guest on BBC’s Business Matters. In 2018, she was named one of 25 Black Scholars You Should Know by TheBestSchools.org. She completed her doctorate in economics/mathematics at Claremont Graduate University.

Rebecca Smith, National Employment Law Project

@rebeccasmitholy

Rebecca Smith is the director of the Work Structures Portfolio at the National Employment Law Project (NELP). She joined NELP in 2000, after nearly 20 years advocating for migrant farmworkers in Washington state. At NELP, Smith has worked with local, state, and national groups to advance the rights of immigrant and low-wage workers and the unemployed. She has worked to apply international human rights laws to help protect immigrant workers in the United States, and with immigrant worker organizing groups to enforce U.S. labor laws. More recently, Smith’s work has centered on domestic outsourcing (the corporate use of franchise and temp and staffing arrangements; subcontracting; and labeling workers as freelancers, self-employed individuals, or “1099s”) as a key driver of eroding labor standards, rising income, and wealth inequality; persistent structural racism; and occupational segregation and the shifting of power away from workers and toward corporations.

Ashley Spalding, Kentucky Center for Economic Policy

@ASpaldingKY

Ashley Spalding is a senior policy analyst at the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy. She joined the staff in October 2011. Spalding has conducted research on social and economic policies affecting low-income families for over 15 years. Her doctoral and postdoctoral research projects at the University of South Florida focused on low-income housing and education, respectively. Spalding holds a Ph.D. in applied anthropology from the University of South Florida, an M.A. in anthropology from the University of South Carolina, and a B.A. in English from Samford University. She is a Kentucky native.

Afifa Khaliq, Florida Public Services Union

Afifa Khaliq is the communications director for the Florida Public Services Union, a member of Service Employees International Union (SEIU).

Naomi Walker, Economic Policy Institute / EARN

@NaomiAWalker

Naomi Walker joined the Economic Policy Institute (EPI) in 2018 as director of the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN), a national network of nearly 60 state and local policy research and advocacy organizations coordinated by EPI. Prior to joining EPI, Naomi Walker served as assistant to the president at the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), the nation’s largest and fastest-growing public services employees union, with more than 1.6 million active and retired members. In her role on the executive team of the union, she was responsible for coordinating AFSCME’s partnerships with allies and coalitions in order to build power for working families. Prior to joining AFSCME in 2012, Walker served as director of state government relations and deputy director of the government affairs department for the AFL-CIO, where she worked with national unions, state federations, state legislators, and allies to coordinate state legislative campaigns around the country, providing guidance on strategy, message, member mobilization, and research, as well as writing model legislation. Walker has coordinated state issue campaigns on a variety of issues, including campaigns fighting so-called “right-to-work” legislation and attacks on working families; exposing profitable corporations like Walmart that shift their health care costs onto state taxpayers; stopping the export of American jobs; and providing affordable health care for working families.

While at the AFL-CIO, Walker also served as assistant director of the AFL-CIO politics and field department, leading labor’s field campaign for the 2006 election cycle. She managed staff across the country as they coordinated labor’s political program to educate, mobilize, and turn out union members to vote. She holds a bachelor’s degree in public policy studies from Duke University.

Tanya Wallace-Gobern, National Black Worker Center Project

Tanya Wallace-Gobern became the executive director of the National Black Worker Center Project in June 2016. Wallace-Gobern brings to her work over 20 years of experience in labor and community organizing. She began her career immediately following college graduation, when she joined the Organizing Institute of the AFL-CIO. Soon after that, her desire to organize black workers led her to work for the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union (ACTWU—a predecessor union of UNITE HERE) and move to the Southeast to help on its unionization campaign in that region. Later, she created the AFL-CIO’s Historically Black College Recruitment program to increase the number of blacks among union leadership and staff. For the past 10 years, Wallace-Gobern has been working for the Coalition of Kaiser Permanente Unions, including running its field operations.

Marilyn Watkins, Economic Opportunity Institute

@eoionline 

Marilyn Watkins, policy director of the Economic Opportunity Institute (EOI), spearheaded the 2017 paid family and medical leave victory in Washington state as well as earlier city and state wins for paid sick days and gender equity. She serves as clinical assistant professor in health services at the University of Washington, is a member of the Washington State Paid Family and Medical Leave Advisory Committee, and is on the executive committee of Family Values @ Work. Before joining EOI in 1999, she worked as a historical consultant and taught Pacific Northwest and U.S. women’s history. She earned a B.A. at Harvard and Ph.D. in history at the University of Michigan.

Laura Wiens, Pittsburghers for Public Transit

Laura Chu Wiens has been a member of the Pittsburghers for Public Transit (PPT) board since 2013 and is involved in its resident campaigns to restore bus service to transit deserts. She assumed the staff position in June 2017. Wiens has her roots in labor organizing with UNITE HERE, and draws from her experience recruiting and training leaders in the service industry to mobilize transit riders in the fight for equity, access, and transparency within our public agencies. Wiens is Chinese American and believes in the collective power of people to transform their communities. In her free time, she sings with a jazz ensemble and plays with her two babes, Gabriel and Hazel.

Jhacova Williams, Economic Policy Institute / PREE

Jhacova Williams is an economist for the Economic Policy Institute’s Program on Race, Ethnicity, and the Economy (PREE). In this capacity, she explores the role of structural racism in shaping racial economic disparities in labor markets, housing, criminal justice, higher education, and other areas that have a direct impact on economic outcomes. Williams’s research has focused on Southern culture and the extent to which historical events have impacted the political behavior and economic outcomes of Southern blacks. Prior to joining EPI, Williams served as an assistant professor at Clemson University and worked as a mathematics lab director and instructor at Xavier University of Louisiana.

Sage Wilson, Working Washington

@workingwa

Sage Wilson has directed Working Washington’s communications and digital organizing work through a series of breakthrough campaigns over the past eight years, including Seattle’s $15 minimum wage, secure scheduling, and domestic workers bill of rights; statewide paid family leave, minimum wage, and paid sick days; groundbreaking national campaigns to restore overtime protections and win new rights for gig workers; numerous marches and rallies; and a variety of other actions.

Valerie Wilson, Economic Policy Institute / PREE

@ValerieRWilson

Valerie Rawlston Wilson is director of the Economic Policy Institute’s Program on Race, Ethnicity, and the Economy (PREE), a nationally recognized source for expert reports and policy analyses on the economic condition of America’s people of color. Prior to joining EPI, Wilson was an economist and vice president of research at the National Urban League Washington Bureau, where she was responsible for planning and directing the bureau’s research agenda. She has written extensively on various issues impacting economic inequality in the United States—including employment and training, income and wealth disparities, access to higher education, and social insurance—and has also appeared in print, television, and radio media. In 2010, through the State Department’s Bureau of International Information Programs, she was selected to deliver the keynote address at an event on Minority Economic Empowerment at the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo, Norway. In 2011, Wilson served on a National Academies Panel on Measuring and Collecting Pay Information from U.S. Employers by Gender, Race, and National Origin.

Julia Wolfe, Economic Policy Institute / EARN

@JuliaWolfe94

Julia Wolfe is an economic analyst on the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN) team at the Economic Policy Institute (EPI). She joined EPI as a research assistant in 2017. She works with EPI’s economists and researchers to analyze current labor market trends, particularly as they relate to education, inequality, and wage growth. Prior to joining EPI, Wolfe worked at the Bureau of Labor Statistics as the retail and manufacturing employment analyst for the Current Employment Statistics program.

Jaimie Worker, Economic Policy Institute / EARN

Jaimie K. Worker is the senior state policy coordinator for the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN) at the Economic Policy Institute (EPI). She is committed to ensuring that racial and gender equity is a public policy priority and that the leaders of communities impacted by structural racism and oppression are key collaborators in developing public policy. Prior to joining EPI, Worker was a senior policy analyst at Community Change, where for more than six years she worked on racial and economic justice campaigns focused on jobs and public investment in partnership with grassroots organizations. Previously, she worked with the New Organizing Institute, as well as the Restaurant Opportunities Center of Michigan, supporting workplace organizing and policy campaigns to win improved working conditions in the restaurant industry. Worker is the proud daughter of immigrants and hails from Detroit, Michigan.

Ben Zipperer, Economic Policy Institute

@ben_zipperer

Ben Zipperer joined the Economic Policy Institute (EPI) in 2016. His areas of expertise include the minimum wage, inequality, and low-wage labor markets. He has published research in the Industrial and Labor Relations Review and has been quoted in outlets such as The New York Times, The Washington Post, Bloomberg, and the BBC. Prior to joining EPI, Zipperer was a research economist at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth. He is a senior research associate at the Center for Economic and Policy Research and a research associate at the Center on Wage and Employment Dynamics at the University of California, Berkeley. Zipperer earned his B.S. in mathematics at the University of Georgia, Athens, and his Ph.D. in economics at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

[/earn-section]

[earn-section id="attendees-by-state" hide]

Attendees (by state)

Alabama

Adelante Alabama Worker Center

  • Luis Eduardo Robledo

Alabama Arise

  • Robyn Hyden
  • Dev Wakeley

Jobs to Move America

  • Tamani Simmons

Arkansas

Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families

  • Bruno Showers

Arizona

Arizona Center for Economic Progress

  • Karen McLaughlin
  • Andrew Sugrue

Grand Canyon Institute

  • Dave Wells

California

Capital & Main

  • Jessica Goodheart

Center for Community Futures

  • Jim Masters

Center on Policy Initiatives

  • Anjleena Sahni

Claremont Graduate University

  • Joseph Dietrich
  • Jean Schroedel

LAANE

  • Alma Castrejon

National Employment Law Project (NELP)

  • Beth Avery

Omidyar Network

  • Joelle Gamble

Partnership for Working Families

  • Felicia Griffin

 PolicyLink

  • Amee Chew

University of California, Berkeley

  • Sylvia Allegretto

University of Southern California

  • Robynn Cox

USC PERE (Program for Environmental & Regional Equity)

  • Lance Hilderbrand
  • Justin Scoggins
  • Arpita Sharma

Working Partnerships USA

  • Ariadna Morales

Colorado

Bell Policy Center

  • Tyler Jaeckel
  • Andrea Kuwik

Colorado Center on Law & Policy

  • Charles Brennan

Colorado Fiscal Institute

  • Chris Stiffler
  • Kathy White

State Innovation Exchange

  • Kyle Huelsman

Connecticut

Center for Popular Democracy

  • Connie Razza

Connecticut Voices for Children

  • Emily Byrne
  • Patrick O’Brien

Working Families Party CT

  • Carlos Moreno

District of Columbia

AFSCME

  • Shaun O’Brien

AFT

  • Ed Muir
  • Melanie Myers
  • Maryanne Salm

Center for American Progress

  • Olugbenga Ajilore
  • Diana Boesch

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

  • Cortney Sanders
  • Wesley Tharpe
  • Louisa Warren
  • Samantha Waxman

Community Change

  • Marisol Bello
  • Alma Couverthie
  • AnneRose Menachery

Coworker.org

  • Aisha Satterwhite

DCFPI

  • Kamolika Das

Drumfire Public Affairs

  • Sam Jefferies

Economic Innovation Group

  • August Benzow

Economic Policy Institute

  • Hunter Blair
  • David Cooper
  • Daniel Costa
  • Pedro Costa
  • Elise Gould
  • Melat Kassa
  • Thea Lee
  • Zane Mokhiber
  • John Schmitt
  • Heidi Shierholz
  • Jhacova Williams
  • Valerie Wilson
  • Ben Zipperer
  • Julia Wolfe
  • Jaimie Worker

Economic Security Project

  • Pedro Morillas

Good Jobs First

  • Greg LeRoy
  • Kasia Tarczynska
  • Christine Wen

Groundwork Collaborative

  • Sapna Mehta
  • Thomas Cox
  • LaNita King

Institute for Women’s Policy Research

  • Chandra Childers

Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy

  • Jessica Schieder

International Brotherhood of Teamsters

  • Stuart Karaffa

Jobs With Justice

  • Benjamin Woods

Labor Network for Sustainability

  • Mike Cavanaugh

Lake Research Partners

  • Celinda Lake

Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law

  • Phylicia Hill

NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program

  • Jacqueline Patterson

National Education Association

  • Michael Petko

National Employment Law Project

  • Michele Evermore

National Immigration Law Center

  • Jessie Hahn

National Public Pension Coalition

  • Tristan Fitzpatrick
  • Margaret Rogers

National Skills Coalition

  • Michael Richardson

National Women’s Law Center

  • Melissa Boteach
  • Sarah David Heydemann
  • Andrea Johnson
  • Jasmine Tucker

SEIU

  • Garrett Schneider

The Fairness Project

  • Chris Salm

The Hub Project

  • Rosalina Jowers
  • Grace Western

U.S. Baha’i Office of Public Affairs

  • Negar Abay

UnidosUS

  • Eric Rodriguez
  • Victoria Melendez

Washington Center for Equitable Growth

  • Katherine Bahn
  • David Mitchell

Florida

Florida Policy Institute

  • Alexis Davis
  • Tachana Marc

Local Progress/Center for Popular Democracy

  • Francesca Menes

Organize Florida

  • Sharona Barnes

SEIU Florida Public Services Union

  • Afifa Khaliq

Georgia

American Heart Association

  • Kim Milbrath

Atlanta Jobs with Justice

  • Shannan Reaze

Georgia Budget & Policy Institute

  • Alex Camardelle

Hawaii

Hawaii Appleseed

  • Nicole Woo

Idaho

United Vision for Idaho

  • Adrienne Evans

Illinois

Center For Tax and Budget Accountability

  • Drazzel Feliu

Chicago Kent College of Law

  • Jane Flanagan

Community Change

  • Chirag Mehta

University of Illinois at Urbana – Champaign

  • Alison Dickson

Voices for Illinois Children

  • Bill Byrnes

Woodstock Institute

  • Janice Guzon

Indiana

Indiana Institute for Working Families

  • Erin Macey

Kansas

Kansas Action for Children

  • Emily Fetsch

Kentucky

Fahe

  • Alex Dadok

Kentucky Center for Economic Policy

  • Anna Baumann
  • Ashley Spalding

Louisiana

Louisiana Budget Project

  • Neva Butkus
  • Jan Moller

NOWCRJ

  • Ursula Price

Power Coalition for Equity and Justice

  • Janea Jamison

Research Institute on Social and Economic Policy

  • Alí Bustamante

Workplace Justice Project at Loyola Law Clinic

  • Erika Zucker

Massachusetts

Boston Indicators

  • Trevor Mattos
  • Luc Schuster

Google

  • Vicki Tardif

Harvard Labor and Worklife Program

  • Terri Gerstein

Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center

  • Phineas Baxandall
  • Marie-Frances Rivera
  • Jeremy Thompson
  • Reginauld Williams
  • Kurt Wise

Maryland

Annie E. Casey Foundation

  • Noah Berger

Maryland Center on Economic Policy

  • Ellen Hutton
  • Benjamin Orr

Seafarers International Union

  • Mark Clements

Maine

Maine Center for Economic Policy

  • Sarah Austin
  • Garrett Martin

Service Employees International Union

  • Erica Rafford-Noyes

Michigan

ACRE (Action Center on Race and the Economy)

  • Maurice BP-Weeks

Kresge Foundation

  • Stephanie Davison
  • Joelle-Jude Fontaine

Lisa D. Cook, Ph.D.

  • Lisa Cook

Michigan League for Public Policy

  • Peter Ruark

Minnesota

Minnesota Budget Project

  • Clark Goldenrod

Missouri

Missouri Budget Project

  • Lindsey Baker

Mississippi

Mississippi State Conference NAACP

  • Corey Wiggins

North Carolina

Duke University, Sanford School of Public Policy

  • Matthew Johnson

Fight for $15/ NC Raise Up

  • Keith Bullard

National Black Worker Center Project

  • Tanya Wallace-Gobern

North Carolina Justice Center

  • Allan Freyer

New Hampshire

New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute

  • Michael Polizzotti

New Jersey

New Jersey Policy Perspective

  • Nicole Rodriguez
  • Sheila Reynertson

Peoples Climate Movement

  • Paul Getsos

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

  • Trene Hawkins

Nevada

Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada

  • Christine Saunders

New York

Bernard and Anne Spitzer Charitable Trust

  • Jean Ross

Center for Popular Democracy

  • Maggie Corser
  • Elizabeth Nicolas

Community Service Society of NY

  • Nancy Rankin

Fiscal Policy Institute

  • Cyierra Roldan
  • Jonas Shaende
  • Shamier Settle

The Ford Foundation

  • Rachel Korberg

FPWA

  • Osman Ahmed

National Employment Law Project

  • Yannet Lathrop

SEIU

  • Katherine Schwalbe

The Century Foundation

  • Amanda Novello

Ohio

Policy Matters Ohio

  • Hannah Halbert
  • Amy Hanauer
  • Wendy Patton
  • Zach Schiller
  • Michael Shields

Oklahoma

Oklahoma Policy Institute

  • Courtney Cullison
  • Damion Shade

Oregon

Oregon Center for Public Policy

  • Audrey Mechling
  • Alejandro Queral

Pennsylvania

Bucknell University

  • Nina Banks

Eastern Minortiy Supplier Development Council

  • Tricina Cash

Heinz College at Carnegie Mellon University

  • Sara Shore

Hill District Consensus Group

  • Carl Redwood

Keystone Research Center

  • Stephen Herzenberg

One Pennsylvania

  • Angel Gober
  • Shakiya Canty
  • Erin Kramer

Pennsylvania House of Representatives

  • Sara Innamorato

Partner4Work

  • Katrina Kadisevskis

Penn State University

  • Lonnie Golden

Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center

  • Erica Freeman
  • Kadida Kenner
  • John Neurohr
  • Diana Polson
  • Adrienne Standley
  • Marc Stier

Philadelphia Inquirer

  • Juliana Feliciano Reyes

SEIU Healthcare Pennsylvania

  • Lisa Frank

United Steelworkers Local 1088

  • Damon Di Cicco

Rhode Island

Economic Progress Institute

  • Alan Krinsky
  • Rachel Flum

Tennessee

ThinkTennessee

  • Mariana Rodriguez

Texas

Center for Public Policy Priorities

  • Jonathan Lewis

Texas Organizing Project

  • Alysa Guerrero

Utah

Voices for Utah Children

  • Matthew Weinstein

Virginia

New Virginia Majority

  • Dominique Dominique
  • Kenneth Gilliam

The Commonwealth Institute for Fiscal Analysis

  • Laura Goren

Women’s Institute for Science, Equity and Race

  • Rhonda Vonshay Sharpe

Vermont

Public Assets Institute

  • Julie Lowell
  • Stephanie Yu

Washington

Economic Opportunity Institute

  • Matthew Caruchet
  • Sam Hatzenbeler
  • Melanie Mazza
  • Gabriela Quintana
  • Marilyn Watkins

National Employment Law Project

  • Rebecca Smith

Working Washington

  • Rachel Lauter
  • Sage Wilson

Wisconsin

COWS

  • Matthew Braunginn
  • Laura Dresser
  • Marybeth McGinnis
  • Joel Rogers

Kids Forward

  • Tamarine Cornelius

Local Solutions Support Center

  • Katie Belanger

Milwaukee Area Service & Hospitality Workers Organization

  • Peter Rickman

University of Wisconsin-Madison

  • Walker Kahn
  • Yair Kaldor

West Virginia

CARE Coalition WV

  • Ashir Coillberg

West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy

  • Seth DiStefano
  • Sean O’Leary
  • Kelly Allen
  • Ted Boettner

[/earn-section]

[earn-section id="attendees-alphabetical" hide]

Attendees (alphabetical)

Negar Abay
U.S. Baha’i Office of Public Affairs

Sanaa Abrar
United We Dream
@UNITEDWEDREAM

Osman Ahmed
FPWA

Olugbenga Ajilore
Center for American Progress
@gbenga_ajilore

Sylvia Allegretto
University of California, Berkeley
@Sly21

Kelly Allen
WV Center on Budget and Policy
@kellakelwv

Sarah Austin
Maine Center for Economic Policy

Beth Avery
National Employment Law Project (NELP)
@NELPNews

Katherine Bahn
Washington Center for Equitable Growth
@LipstickEcon

Jason Bailey
Kentucky Center for Economic Policy
@jbaileyky

Lindsey Baker
Missouri Budget Project

Nina Banks
Bucknell University
@Nina_EBanks

Janet Bauer
Oregon Center for Public Policy

Anna Baumann
Kentucky Center for Economic Policy
@KyPolicy

Phineas Baxandall
Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center
@PBaxandall

Katie Belanger
Local Solutions Support Center

Marisol Bello
Community Change
@Marisol_Bello

August Benzow
Economic Innovation Group

Noah Berger
Annie E. Casey Foundation

Berlyn Best
The Commonwealth Institute for Fiscal Analysis

Hunter Blair
Economic Policy Institute

Diana Boesch
Center for American Progress

Ted Boettner
WV Center on Budget and Policy
@WVCBP

Melissa Boteach
National Women’s Law Center
@mboteach

Matthew Braunginn
COWS

Charles Brennan
Colorado Center on Law & Policy

Keith Bullard
Fight for $15/ NC Raise Up

Alí Bustamante
Research Institute on Social and Economic Policy
@DrAliBustamante

Neva Butkus
Louisiana Budget Project
@neva_butkus

Emily Byrne
Connecticut Voices for Children
@ebbyrne | @CTVoices

Bill Byrnes
Voices for Illinois Children
@Voices4ILKids

Alex Camardelle
Georgia Budget & Policy Institute
@akcamardelle

Shakiya Canty
One Pennsylvania

Vanessa Carter
USC PERE
@PERE_USC

Matthew Caruchet
Economic Opportunity Institute
@eoionline

Tricina Cash
EMSDC

Mike Cavanaugh
Labor Network for Sustainability

Amee Chew
PolicyLink
@AmeeChews

Chandra Childers
Institute for Women’s Policy Research
@ChandraChilders

Mark Clements
Seafarers International Union

Ashir Coillberg
CARE Coalition WV

Lisa Cook
Lisa D. Cook, Ph.D.
@drlisadcook

David Cooper
Economic Policy Institute
@metaCoop

Tamarine Cornelius
Kids Forward
@Tamarine608

Maggie Corser
Center for Popular Democracy

Daniel Costa
Economic Policy Institute

Pedro Costa
Economic Policy Institute
@pdacosta

Alma Couverthie
Community Change

Thomas Cox
The Groundwork Collaborative
@Groundwork

Courtney Cullison
Oklahoma Policy Institute

Alex Dadok
Fahe

Kamolika Das
DCFPI
@Kamolika_Das

Alexis Davis
Florida Policy Institute
@SocialPsychA

Stephanie Davison
Kresge Foundation

Damon Di Cicco
United Steelworkers Local 1088

Alison Dickson
University of Illinois at Urbana – Champaign

Joseph Dietrich
Claremont Graduate University

Seth DiStefano
West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy
@sethano

Dominique Dominique
New Virginia Majority

Laura Dresser
COWS

Adrienne Evans
United Vision for Idaho

Michele Evermore
National Employment Law Project
@evermoremichele

Drazzel Feliu
Center For Tax and Budget Accountability

Emily Fetsch
Kansas Action for Children
@EmilyKansas

Tristan Fitzpatrick
National Public Pension Coalition

Jane Flanagan
Chicago Kent College of Law
@Jane_R_Flanagan

Rachel Flum
The Economic Progress

Joelle-Jude Fontaine
The Kresge Foundation

Lisa Frank
SEIU Healthcare Pennsylvania

Erica Freeman
Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center

Allan Freyer
NC Justice Center
@AllanFreyer

Joelle Gamble
Omidyar Network
@joelle_gamble

Paul Getsos
Peoples Climate Movement
@Peoples_Climate

Kenneth Gilliam
New Virginia Majority

Angel Gober
One PA
@angeldaguard

Lonnie Golden
Penn State University
@lonniegolden5

Clark Goldenrod
Minnesota Budget Project

Jessica Goodheart
Capital & Main

Colin Gordon
University of Iowa

Laura Goren
The Commonwealth Institute for Fiscal Analysis

Elise Gould
Economic Policy Institute
@eliselgould

Felicia Griffin
The Partnership for Working Families

Alysa Guerrero
Texas Organizing Project
@TXOrgProject

Janice Guzon
Woodstock Institute
@WoodstockInst

Jessie Hahn
National Immigration Law Center
@hahn_jessie

Amy Hanauer
Policy Matters Ohio
@amyhanauer

Sam Hatzenbeler
Economic Opportunity Institute
@eoionline

Trene Hawkins
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Stephen Herzenberg
Keystone Research Center

Sarah David Heydemann
National Women’s Law Center

Lance Hilderbrand
USC PERE (Program for Environmental & Regional Equity)

Phylicia Hill
Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law
@phyliciahhill

Kyle Huelsman
State Innovation Exchange

Ellen Hutton
Maryland Center on Economic Policy

Robyn Hyden
Alabama Arise
@robynhyden

Sara Innamorato
PA House of Representatives
@innamo

Tyler Jaeckel
The Bell Policy Center
@bellpolicy

Janea Jamison
Power Coalition for Equity and Justice

Sarah Jimenez
Community Labor United

Andrea Johnson
National Women’s Law Center
@andylynnjo

Matthew Johnson
Duke University, Sanford School of Public Policy
@mslater_johnson

Janelle Jones
Groundwork Collaborative
@janellecj

Tachana Joseph
Florida Policy Institute

Rosalina Jowers
The Hub Project

Katrina Kadisevskis
Partner4Work
@PghWorkforce

Walker Kahn
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Yair Kaldor
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Stuart Karaffa
International Brotherhood of Teamsters

Melat Kassa
Economic Policy Institute
@its_Melat

Kadida Kenner
Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center

Afifa Khaliq
Florida Public Services Union – SEIU

LaNita King
The Groundwork Collaborative
@kinglanita

Rachel Korberg
Ford  Foundation

Erin Kramer
One Pennsylvania
@ErinEKramer

Alan Krinsky
Economic Progress Institute
@EconProgressRI

Andrea Kuwik
Bell Policy Center

Celinda Lake
Lake Research Partners

Yannet Lathrop
National Employment Law Project

Rachel Lauter
Working Washington/Fair Work Center
@rachellauter

Thea Lee
Economic Policy Institute
@TheaLeeEPI

Greg LeRoy
Good Jobs First
@GregLeRoy4

Jonathan Lewis
Center for Public Policy Priorities

Julie Lowell
Public Assets Institute

Erin Macey
IIWF
@INInstitute

Jim Masters
Center for Community Futures

Trevor Mattos
Boston Indicators
@BosIndicators

Adewale Maye
Center for Law and Social Policy

Melanie Mazza
Economic Opportunity Institute
@eoionline

Marybeth McGinnis
COWS (UW-Madison)

Karen McLaughlin
Arizona Center for Economic Progress

Audrey Mechling
Oregon Center for Public Policy

CHIRAG MEHTA
Community Change

Sapna Mehta
Groundwork Collaborative

Victoria Melendez
UnidosUS; formerly NCLR

AnneRose Menachery
Community Change

Francesca Menes
Local Progress/Center for Popular Democracy
@francescamenes

Kim Milbrath
American Heart Association

David Mitchell
Washington Center for Equitable Growth
@dsmitch28

Zane Mokhiber
Economic Policy Institute
@zanemokhiber

Jan Moller
Louisiana Budget Project
@labudgetproject

Ariadna Morales
Working Partnerships USA

Carlos Moreno
Working Families Party CT

Pedro Morillas
Economic Security Project

Ed Muir
AFT

Melanie Myers
AFT

John Neurohr
Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center

Elizabeth Nicolas
Center for Popular Democracy

Amanda Novello
The Century Foundation
@novelloamanda

Shaun O’Brien
AFSCME

Salewa Ogunmefun
One Pennsylvania

Sean O’Leary
West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy

Benjamin Orr
Maryland Center on Economic Policy

Jacqueline Patterson
NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program
@JacquiPatt

Wendy Patton
Policy Matters Ohio
@WendyPattonPMO

Michael Petko
National Education Association
@drpetko

Michael Polizzotti
New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute

Diana Polson
Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center

Ursula Price
NOWCRJ

Alejandro Queral
Oregon Center for Public Policy
@AQueralR

Gabriela Quintana
Economic Opportunity Institute

Nancy Rankin
Community Service Society of NY
@narankin

Connie Razza
Center for Popular Democracy
@ConnieRazza

Shannan Reaze
Atlanta Jobs with Justice

Carl Redwood
Hill District Consensus Group

Juliana Feliciano Reyes
Philadelphia Inquirer
@juliana_f_reyes

Sheila Reynertson
NJ Policy Perspective
@sreynertsn

Antanina Ricceri
Economic Policy Institute

Michael Richardson
National Skills Coalition
@IamMikeRich

Taneeka Richardson
Maryland Center on Economic Policy

Peter Rickman
Milwaukee Area Service & Hospitality Workers Organization

Marie-Frances Rivera
Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center
@MarieFrances_MA

Derrick Robinson
Center on Policy Initiatives
@cpisd

Mary Rocchio
East-West gateway Council of Governments

Eric Rodriguez
UnidosUS

Mariana Rodriguez
ThinkTennessee

Nicole Rodriguez
New Jersey Policy Perspective

Joel Rogers
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Margaret Rogers
National Public Pension Coalition

Cyierra Roldan
Fiscal Policy Institute
@fiscalpolicy00

Jean Ross
Bernard and Anne Spitzer Charitable Trust

Peter Ruark
Michigan League for Public Policy

Anjleena Sahni
Center on Policy Initiatives
@CPIsd

Chris Salm
The Fairness Project

Cortney Sanders
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
@cort_sand

Aisha Satterwhite
Coworker.org

Christine Saunders
Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada

Jessica Schieder
Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy

Zach Schiller
Policy Matters Ohio

John Schmitt
Economic Policy Institute
@jschmittwdc

Garrett Schneider
SEIU

Jean Schroedel
Claremont Graduate University

Luc Schuster
Boston Indicators

Katherine Schwalbe
SEIU

Justin Scoggins
USC PERE (Program for Environmental & Regional Equity)

Shamier Settle
The Fiscal Policy Institute

Jonas Shaende
Fiscal Policy Institute

Arpita Sharma
USC PERE (Program for Environmental & Regional Equity)

Rhonda Vonshay Sharpe
Women’s Institute for Science, Equity and Race
@RhondaVSharpe @WISERPolicy

Michael Shields
Policy Matters Ohio

Heidi Shierholz
Economic Policy Institute
@hshierholz

Sara Shore
Heinz College at Carnegie Mellon University

Bruno Showers
Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families
@bmynthi

Tamani Simmons
Jobs to Move America

Rebecca Smith
National Employment Law Project

Ashley Spalding
Kentucky Center for Economic Policy
@ASpaldingKY

Adrienne Standley
Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center

Marc Stier
Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center

Andrew Sugrue
AZ Center for Economic Progress

Kasia Tarczynska
Good Jobs First
@GoodJobsFirst

Vicki Tardif
Google
@vickitardif

Wesley Tharpe
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
@WCTharpe

Jeremy Thompson
Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center
@jeremybthompson

Jasmine Tucker
National Women’s Law Center

Diana Velasquez
SEIU Florida Public Services Union

Dev Wakeley
Alabama Arise
@DevWakeley

Naomi Walker
EARN @ Economic Policy Institute

Tanya Wallace-Gobern
NBWCP

Louisa Warren
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

Marilyn Watkins
Economic Opportunity Institute
@eoionline

Michelle Webster
The Impact Project

Matthew Weinstein
Voices for Utah Children
@UTChildren

Dave Wells
Grand Canyon Institute
@GrandCanyonInst

Christine Wen
Good Jobs First

Grace Western
The Hub Project

Kathy White
Colorado Fiscal Institute

Laura Wiens
Pittsburghers for Public Transit
@pgh4pubtransit

Dr. Corey Wiggins
Mississippi State Conference NAACP

Jhacova Williams
Economic Policy Institute

Reginauld Williams
MassBudget
@ReginauldWill

Sage Wilson
Working Washington
@workingwa

Valerie Wilson
Economic Policy Institute
@ValerieRWilson

Andrew Wolf
University of Wisconsin-Madison
@MrAndrewTheWolf

Julia Wolfe
Economic Policy Institute, EARN
@JuliaWolfe94

Nicole Woo
Hawaii Appleseed
@HIAppleseed

Benjamin Woods
Jobs With Justice

Jaimie Worker
EARN/EPI

Laura Yepez
Prosperity Now

Stephanie Yu
Public Assets Institute
@PAIsteph

Sarah Zimmerman
SEIU Local 1000

Ben Zipperer
Economic Policy Institute

Erika Zucker
Workplace Justice Project at Loyola Law Clinic
@ErikaZucker

[/earn-section]

[earn-section id="attendees-by-state" hide]

EARN groups

Alabama

  • Alabama Arise

Arizona

  • Arizona Center for Economic Progress (Unit of Children’s Action Alliance)

Arkansas

  • Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families

California

  • California Budget & Policy Center
  • Center on Policy Initiatives
  • East Bay Alliance for a Sustainable Economy
  • Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy
  • Working Partnerships USA

 Colorado

  • Bell Policy Center
  • Colorado Center on Law and Policy
  • Colorado Fiscal Institute

Connecticut

  • Connecticut Voices for Children

District of Columbia

  • DC Fiscal Policy Institute

Florida

  • Florida Policy Institute

Georgia

  • Georgia Budget and Policy Institute

Hawaii

  • Hawaiʻi Appleseed

Idaho

  • United Vision for Idaho

Illinois

  • Center for Tax and Budget Accountability
  • Fiscal Policy Center at Voices for Illinois Children

Indiana

  • Indiana Institute for Working Families

Iowa

  • Iowa Policy Project

Kansas

  • Kansas Center for Economic Growth (part of Kansas Action for Children)

Kentucky

  • Kentucky Center for Economic Policy
  • Kentucky Youth Advocates

Louisiana

  • Louisiana Budget Project

Maine

  • Maine Center for Economic Policy

Maryland

  • Maryland Center for Economic Policy

Massachusetts

  • Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center

Michigan

  • Michigan League for Public Policy

Minnesota

  • Minnesota Budget Project

Mississippi

  • One Voice

Missouri

  • Missouri Budget Project

Montana

  • Montana Budget and Policy Center

Nevada

  • Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada (PLAN)

New Hampshire

  • New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute

New Jersey

  • New Jersey Policy Perspective

New Mexico

  • New Mexico Voices for Children

New York

  • Fiscal Policy Institute

North Carolina

  • North Carolina Justice Center

Ohio

  • Policy Matters Ohio

Oklahoma

  • Oklahoma Policy Institute

Oregon

  • Oregon Center for Public Policy

Pennsylvania

  • Keystone Research Center

Rhode Island

  • The Economic Progress Institute

Texas

  • Center for Public Policy Priorities

Utah

  • Voices for Utah Children

Vermont

  • Public Assets Institute

Virginia

  • The Commonwealth Institute for Fiscal Analysis

Washington

  • Economic Opportunity Institute
  • Washington State Budget and Policy Center

West Virginia

  • West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy

Wisconsin

  • COWS
  • Kids Forward

Wyoming

  • Equality State Policy Center

[/earn-section]

[earn-section id="notes" hide]

Notes

[/earn-section]