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EconomicPolicyInstitute

African Americans are paid less than whites at every education level

Even though the economy continues to improve and wages are finally beginning to inch up for most Americans, African Americans are still being paid less than whites at every education level. A new Economic Snapshot shows that since 1979, the gaps between black and white workers have grown the most among workers with a bachelor’s degree or higher—the most educated workers. The findings show that education alone is not enough to overcome the effects of racial discrimination in pay.

EARN

EARNCon 2016 in St. Louis

EPI is proud to announce the 2016 annual conference of the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN). This year’s conference, Progress for Every Community, will be held in St. Louis from December 14-16. The conference will continue EARN’s multi-year campaign to support state and local efforts to raise wages and strengthen labor standards. Join us for EARNCon 2016 in St. Louis

TRAVEL

Transforming the way the world travels

EPI is lucky to share an office with the Center for Responsible Travel (CREST), a unique non-profit that promotes responsible tourism policies and practices. CREST is offering the following guided educational trips: Cuba (January 27—February 3), Iran (May), and Crete (July). For more details, visit the CREST website.

 

IN THE NEWS
Reuters
The Washington Post covered EPI’s report on the racial wage gap, writing, “The black-white wage gap has become wider—and is widening faster—among those with more education.” | "Why black workers who do everything right still get left behind" »
Reuters
U.S. News & World Report also covered EPI’s racial wage gap report, noting that the gap between white and black workers’ hourly wages widened to nearly 27 percent, the widest racial pay gap in 40 years. | "The Bad News about Good Census Numbers" »
Reuters
Evan Horowitz of the Boston Globe cited EPI research in a column about retirement inequality, writing, “Half of all families in the United States have less than $5,000 in retirement accounts.” | "Retirement inequality hitting many hard" »
Reuters
The Christian Science Monitor interviewed EPI’s Elise Gould about inequality in America. “It’s really entered the debate in terms of economics,” she said. “There’s much more awareness than a decade ago, even though [income inequality] has been growing for three decades.” | "Is 2016 the year of the worker?" »
Reuters
CNN Money cited trade research by EPI’s Rob Scott, noting that America lost about 800,000 jobs to Mexico between 1997 and 2013. | "Trump myths vs. reality on trade" »
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