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Progress for Every Community

The 2016 annual EARN conference is being sited in St. Louis in recognition of the central role the community has played in national discussions of economic and racial justice over the course of the past two years. “Ferguson” has become shorthand for the failure of cities, municipalities, and the public sector more broadly to adequately serve and support residents of all races, faiths, and backgrounds. The riots and protests that took place in the city beginning in 2014 agitated decades-old social fault lines regarding police brutality, discriminatory housing policy, and the denial of essential civil rights to communities of color. But the protests also inspired a new generation of activists and thought-leaders to speak out about the injustice– racial, economic, and otherwise–they experience and the change required to achieve greater equity. Whereas last year’s conference in Los Angeles celebrated progressive victories at the state and local level, this year’s conference hopes to shed light on some of the challenges faced by communities where victories are harder to achieve but are just as desperately needed.

The 2016 conference will also continue EARN’s multi-year campaign to support state and local efforts to raise wages and strengthen labor standards. We urge you to join us at the conference as we convene EARN’s deep bench of policy and economic experts with the activists, community groups, and labor allies that form the core of efforts to move policies at the state and local level to raise wages and improve living standards for the broad majority.

Conference dates: December 14–16, 2016*

*Registration will open Wednesday, December 14th at 4:00 pm. Program will run until Friday, December 16th at 3:00 pm.

Marriott St. Louis Grand
800 Washington Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63101
Tel: 800-397-1282

 Detailed agenda | Contact the organizers | Access Conference Materials

For EARN members: Click here to access previous years’ conference materials.

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Wednesday, Dec. 14

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Registration

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom Foyer
  • Time: 4:00–7:00 pm

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Dinner

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  • Location: Crystal Ballroom
  • Time: 5:00–7:00 pm

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Opening Plenary: Learning from St. Louis

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 1-3
  • Time: 7:00-8:30 pm
  • Session: Plenary

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St. Louis has played a central role in national discussions of economic and racial justice over the course of the past two years. “Ferguson” has become shorthand for the failure of cities, municipalities, and the public sector more broadly to adequately serve and support residents of all races, faiths, and socioeconomic backgrounds. The violent riots and protests that took place in the city beginning in 2014 agitated decades-old social fault lines regarding police brutality, discriminatory housing policy, and the denial of essential civil rights to minority communities. But the protests also enraged a new generation to speak out about the injustice– racial, socioeconomic, and otherwise–they experience and understand. In this opening plenary, we will hear about the policy decisions that led to segregation and exclusion in the St. Louis region. We will also hear from local organizers and activists who are leading the charge to undo decades of systematic disadvantaging of the African American community.

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  • Colin Gordon, University of Iowa
  • Rev. Starsky Wilson, Deaconess Foundation
  • Kayla Reed, Movement for Black Lives & St. Louis Action Council
  • Derek Laney, Missourians Organizing for Reform & Empowerment
  • Clarissa Hayward, Washington University

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Welcome Reception

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom Foyer
  • Time: 8:30-11:00 pm

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Thursday, Dec. 15

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Breakfast

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 4
  • Time: 7:30-8:30am

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Plenary: Big ideas for economic justice

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  • Location: Landmark Ballrooms 1-3
  • Time: 8:40-9:50 am
  • Session: Plenary

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In the aftermath of the election, there is a greater need than ever before for progressive thinkers to articulate a bold policy agenda that can guide and inspire lawmakers, advocates, and citizens. EARN groups work on a daily basis to generate, analyze, promote, and defend state and local policies that will improve the lives of low- and middle-income working families. Yet we all recognize that to create an economy that truly works for everyone, we will need transformative national change.  In this session, national thought-leaders will present a number of “big ideas” that could transform our economic system and lead a discussion on how researchers and advocates at the state and local level can engage on these ideas.

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  • Moderator: Noah Berger, Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center
  • David Madland, Center for American Progress
  • Anne Price, Insight Center for Community Economic Development
  • Zach Silk, Civic Ventures

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Session 1.1 | 10:00am–11:15am

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Promoting job quality in workforce development

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 5
  • Time: 10:00-11:15 am
  • Session: 1.1

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This session will highlight the ground-breaking efforts of the Hospitality Training Academy (HTA), a labor-management partnership, in collaboration with a one-stop job center (American Job Centers (AJCs) and the City of Los Angeles’ Workforce Development Board (WDB), to move low-income African-American, Asian-American and Transgender clients into union hospitality jobs, with good wages and benefits. Drawing on the experience of a foundation-funded workforce project spanning Cincinnati, Ohio and parts of Kentucky and Indiana, Hannah Halbert will discuss how regions without significant union presence can use their workforce programs to promote job quality and higher wages. In the last part of the workshop, Laura Dresser will lead a discussion, informed by the EARN multi-state workforce project, of policies that could help more WDBs to focus training and job placement efforts on employers with better than typical jobs for their industry or who are willing to commit to improving jobs. This discussion will also  consider the potential for a future EARN multi-state workforce project aimed at strengthening the focus of local and state workforce systems on job quality.

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  • Moderator: Stephen Herzenberg, Keystone Research Center
  • Laura Dresser, COWS
  • Adine Forman, Hospitality Training Academy Los Angeles
  • Hannah Halbert, Policy Matters Ohio

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Making the case for good infrastructure investment

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 6
  • Time: 10:00-11:15 am
  • Session: 1.1

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If infrastructure is such a popular and bipartisan issue, then why has it been so challenging to generate the necessary investment for public infrastructure?  A panel of experts with experience in research, advocacy, and government discuss the political and organizing obstacles, the crises, traps, and opportunities ahead, the revenue gimmicks to avoid, and the lessons learned in their experience as researchers and advocates in transportation and water infrastructure.

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  • Moderator: Phineas Baxandall, Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center
  • Laura Barrett, Interfaith Worker Justice
  • Darnell Chadwick Grisby, American Public Transportation Association
  • Laura Orlando, Boston University

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Job quality and racial equity

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 7
  • Time: 10:00-11:15 am
  • Session: 1.1

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This workshop will explore inequity in the job market and the quality of jobs by race and ethnicity. Panelists will discuss wage inequity, occupational segregation by race and gender, how workers of color are impacted by the uneven enforcement of employment laws and regulations, disparities in access to core job benefits such as paid sick time and health coverage, and the challenges facing immigrant workers.

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  • Moderator: Tamara Draut, Demos
  • Kristian Blackmon, Missouri Jobs with Justice
  • Chandra Childers, Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR)
  • Pamela Joshi, Institute for Child, Youth, and Family Policy

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Lunch Plenary: Building power in the states – Lessons from the right

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 4
  • Time: 11:20-1:00 pm
  • Session: Plenary

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Theda Skocpol and Alexander Hertel-Fernandez have spent years documenting the strategies, leadership, policy infrastructure, and resources that allowed the right to build power and impact in the states. This session will describe how conservative forces set the stage to dominate the policy agenda and to control a large majority of state legislative and executive offices. The presenters will provide their perspective on the lessons EARN and other state networks can take from the success of the right, and how progressive organizations can forge their own path to power and policy successes.

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  • Theda Skocpol, Harvard University
  • Alexander Hertel-Fernandez, Columbia University

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Session 1.2 | 1:10pm–2:25pm

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The Fight for $15: How wonks should be thinking about $15

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 5
  • Time: 1:10-2:25 pm
  • Session: 1.2

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New York, California, and over a dozen cities have passed legislation that will establish $15 minimum wages over the next several years. Moreover, the platform of the Democratic party now calls for $15 national wage floor. This would be the biggest change in labor market policy since the New Deal, and it has raised important questions for policymakers and experts: How do we determine the appropriate level of the minimum wage? If a $15 minimum wage is outside the bounds of studied U.S. experience, what can we say about its impact on the economy? Should policymakers be concerned about job losses? What does “job loss” actually mean? How will state and local governments need to adjust to higher minimum wages? In this session, some of the country’s foremost experts on the minimum wage will tackle these and other questions.

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  • David Cooper, EPI/EARN
  • David Howell, The New School
  • Michael Reich, University of California at Berkeley

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New tools for measuring (and improving) the effectiveness of economic development subsidies

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 6
  • Time: 1:10-2:25 pm
  • Session: 1.2

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Economic development incentives see widespread use at the state and local levels, yet they remain costly and difficult to assess in terms of their effectiveness. Thanks to the efforts of state and national advocacy organizations, new tools, data, and analytical approaches are now becoming available for fully measuring the costs of subsidy projects, assessing the extent to which they deliver on their promises, and identifying policy and program interventions that can improve outcomes for workers.

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  • Allan Freyer, North Carolina Justice Center
  • Josh Goodman, Pew Trusts

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Training session: EARN 101 – How to use SWXX files, Jobwatch, and other EARN tools

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 7
  • Time: 1:10-2:25 pm
  • Session: 1.2

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This session is meant as an introduction or refresher for some of the most popular data tools available to members through EARN. The session will open with a discussion of State Jobs Day tools and best practices. Thereafter, we will move through the suite of State of Working X (SWXX) materials available to EARN members. The session will attempt to highlight the breadth of the resources available– where to find them and how they can be used– rather than drilling down within any one of the products. The session will, however, be interactive. Attendees are encouraged to bring laptops to participate in application exercises. The session will also touch briefly on state productivity data, trends in income inequality, and immigration data. A generous amount of time will be set aside for questions.

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  • Jessica Schieder, EPI/EARN

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Break

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom Foyer
  • Time: 2:25-3:00pm

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Session 1.3 | 3:00–4:15 pm

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Occupational licensing reform: Separating the good from the bad

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 5
  • Time: 3:00–4:15 pm
  • Session: 1.3

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Over the past year, op-eds have appeared in a number of papers across the country calling for reform of state occupational licensing requirements. Several state legislatures have taken up bills on this issue, prominent think tanks have issued reports calling for changes, and even the White House has proposed measures for reform. But where is this all coming from and what does it mean? There are legitimate reforms that should be considered to expand opportunities to immigrants and formerly incarcerated individuals. At the same time, some of these ploys–advanced under the guise of reform–may simply be efforts to undermine labor standards and certification programs that ensure safety, job quality, mobility, and wages. In this session, we will discuss the good ideas and the bad ones – making sure you know how to respond when calls for reform start popping up in your state.

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  • Robert Pleasure, North America’s Building Trades Unions
  • Samuel Krinsky, 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East
  • Mary Beth Salomone Testa, MBST Solutions & the National Association for Family Child Care
  • David Dyssegaard Kallick, Fiscal Policy Institute 

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EARN in the Red: Brainstorming on a southern strategy for working families and EARN

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 6
  • Time: 3:00–4:15 pm
  • Session: 1.3

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EARN’s partners in red states often feel that they are limited in what they can do around an agenda for working families, a concern that has special characteristics and is even more pronounced in the south. To explore these challenges and look for opportunities, this session will engage with organizations from red states about how EARN can provide more meaningful support to groups, particularly in southern states. Southern EARN EDs will kick off the discussion, reflect on the limitations of EARN presently and what might reasonably be accomplished in the future with EARN support. Come hear about opportunities and obstacles. And be prepared to share your thoughts about what can be accomplished in red states and how EARN can provide support to states that aren’t in a position to undertake some of the reforms and initiatives that groups in more traditionally progressive states are able to do. A constructive critique of EARN’s offerings for southern/red states and suggestions on how we can be of use and relevant in the region will be encouraged.

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  • Ann Beeson, Center for Public Policy Priorities
  • Amy Blouin, Missouri Budget Project
  • Ted Boettner, West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy 
  • Dianne Stewart, EPI/EARN

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Finally, a price tag on corporate welfare! Are you ready for GASB 77 data?

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 7
  • Time: 3:00–4:15 pm
  • Session: 1.3

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Do you suspect that funding for public services in your state or city is undermined by excessive corporate tax breaks? If you answered “yes,” your ship has come in! Join Good Jobs First and a state auditing official as we explain how you can best prepare for the first-ever flood of tax expenditure data mandated by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) under its Statement No. 77 on Tax Abatement Disclosures (its latest amendment to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, or GAAP.)

Under Statement No. 77, all states and most local government bodies—including most school districts—will have to compute and disclose how much revenue they lose to corporate tax breaks granted in the name of economic development. For all progressive budget advocates and their allies who have better uses for the money (e.g., K-12, infrastructure, community college, EITCs, etc.), the new accounting standard will reveal tens of billions of dollars in opportunity-cost data never before made public.

Find out how the data will appear in Comprehensive Annual Financial Reports (CAFRs); who oversees GAAP compliance in your state; who collects CAFRs and what they do with them; and who else in your state commented on the draft statement (including elected officials and academic experts). Good Jobs First will provide detailed “cheat sheets” for every state in attendance.

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  • Greg LeRoy, Good Jobs First
  • Sarita Nair, Office of the State Auditor of New Mexico

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EARN Directors’ Meeting

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  • Location: Landmark 6
  • Time: 4:20- 5:45 pm

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Friday, Dec. 16

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Breakfast

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 4
  • Time: 7:30- 8:30 am

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Session 2.1 | 8:40am–9:55am

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Survey to win: Using community-based surveys to power fair scheduling campaigns

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 5
  • Time: 8:40-9:55am
  • Session: 2.1

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In the past few years, volatile work schedules have emerged in the public eye as a major challenge for lower-wage workers in the US. Workers and advocates nationwide are mobilizing to address the issue, campaigning for – and winning – new labor standards to regulate work schedules for the first time in decades. San Francisco and Seattle are the first major cities to enact comprehensive legislation guaranteeing certain retail and restaurant workers basic protections from abusive scheduling practices. More than a dozen other cities and states have launched campaigns to pass such laws, and a federal bill has been introduced in Congress.

In several of the cities organizing to pass fair scheduling laws, community-based surveys have played a key role in exposing the extent of the problem, mobilizing workers, and activating media, policymaker, and public interest in the issues. This panel brings together advocates from several campaigns that have used surveys focused on scheduling as a part of their strategy to win. The panel will also include leading researchers with expertise on work scheduling issues. Together, panelists will review some of the key findings from their surveys; discuss the lessons they have learned from fielding community-based surveys; talk about the impact of the surveys on their campaigns; and draw on the researchers’ expertise to provide guidance to others considering similar approaches to fair scheduling campaigns. Workshop participants will gain a comprehensive picture of the community-based survey approach to fair scheduling campaigns and leave the session with ideas for their own advocacy-focused survey projects.

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  • Moderator: Maggie Corser, Center for Popular Democracy
  • Anna Haley-Lock, Rutgers University School of Social Work
  • Sejal Parikh, Working Washington
  • Victoria Ramirez, Working Partnerships USA
  • Ari Schwartz, DC Jobs with Justice

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Pitchfork politics: How to turn American anger to effective action

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 6
  • Time: 8:40-9:55am
  • Session: 2.1

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For the past year we’ve all witnessed an angry and anxious electorate, pushing back against a government that seems to be run of, by and for the elites. Beliefs that prevent progress in advancing policy change, and that advocates confront on a daily basis have been front and center, such as:

• My vote doesn’t matter. People like me have no say.
• There would be plenty of money to fund public programs if they cut waste, fraud and abuse.
• Private business would do a better job than government bureaucrats.
• Politicians are all bought.

These problems are not insurmountable. The Topos Partnership has conducted a deep exploration of public understandings of government, taxes, privatization and money in politics. These four separate, but related research projects provide powerful cross-cutting strategies for advancing progressive change.

In this session, we’ll share common lessons advocates should attend to across issue and policy debates. These lessons go far beyond bumper stickers or slogans. They represent fundamental ideas with the potential to engage citizens and put advocates in a far better position to win these debates.

In addition to learning the overarching strategy, you’ll also hear from advocates who are putting these lessons to use in their states.

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  • Moderator: Remy Trupin, TOPOS Partnership
  • Meg Bostrom, TOPOS Partnership
  • Joe Grady, TOPOS Partnership
  • Renell Weathers, Michigan League for Public Policy (MLPP)

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Rescuing the unemployment insurance safety net

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 7
  • Time: 8:40-9:55am
  • Session: 2.1

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The ravages of the Great Recession are still being felt by the unemployment insurance safety net. A record number of state unemployment trust funds went into debt, spurring many states to enact major, permanent benefit restrictions. Now, fewer than 3 out of every 10 jobless workers are receiving an unemployment check; in some states, the rate is lower than 2 in 10. With state trust funds at their best level since 2002, now is the time to strategize on a way to reverse the tide. The extended economic recovery gives advocates a chance to rebuild this critical economic shock absorber to deal with today’s unstable economy and be prepared for the next recession. Come hear from national experts and state-based EARN members with the latest research on the UI program, lessons from critical state discussions , and bold national plans for reform.

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  • Claire McKenna, National Employment Law Project
  • Zach Schiller, Policy Matters Ohio
  • Andrew Stettner, The Century Foundation
  • Ilana Boivie, DC Fiscal Policy Institute

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Session 2.2 | 10:00am–11:15am

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Expanding job opportunities for people with records

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 5
  • Time: 10:00-11:15am
  • Session: 2.2

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The recent election showed us at least two themes: there aren’t enough good paying jobs to go around and racism still runs deep in the United States. Barriers to employment for people with records stand at the intersection of these two themes, with legal and individual discrimination blocking employment even when there are jobs available. This workshop will connect the results of the recent election to recent research, cover some of the work happening across the country to dismantle barriers to employment, and provide a space for discussion.

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  • Allyson Fredericksen, People’s Action Institute
  • Marilyn Reyes-Scales, VOCAL-NY
  • Michelle Natividad Rodriguez, National Employment Law Project

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Preserving progressive local control

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 6
  • Time: 10:00-11:15am
  • Session: 2.2

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Across the country, state governments are interfering with the ability of local governments to pass health, safety, workplace and environmental ordinances. This is driven in large part by conservative organizations, and has a large impact on local organizing and policy. This session will review where preemption is happening and on what issues, how to talk about it effectively, and what role researchers and advocates can play in these fights. We’ll examine several case studies, focusing on minimum wage and local hire policies.

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  • Moderator: Sam Munger, SiX
  • Lauren Bonds, SEIU
  • Miya Saika Chen, Partnership for Working Families
  • Kim Haddow, Haddow Communications
  • Tracy McCreery, Missouri State Representative

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State retirement plans: What would they look like if they supported and protected retirees?

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 7
  • Time: 10:00-11:15am
  • Session: 2.2

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Retirement security is a mess. Social Security benefits are low. The retirement age is going up. Most people have nothing or next to nothing saved for retirement. One of the last rulings of the Obama Administration has been to green light state-run initiatives that give all private-sector workers access to a retirement savings plan at work. Wait, what? Automatic access to a retirement savings plan for all workers? Yes. California, Connecticut, Illinois, Maryland and Oregon have taken action. Other states and several large cities are considering innovative approaches. Get in the game on this—it helps workers and wins in the legislature. Even Republicans like it.

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  • Steve Hill, Service Employees International Union

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Session 2.3 | 11:20am–12:35pm

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Wage theft and what to do about it

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 5
  • Time: 11:20am-12:35pm
  • Session: 2.3

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The panel will discuss the scope of the wage theft problem, the major obstacles to controlling or remedying wage theft, and legislative solutions that state legislatures and cities can enact. A special emphasis will be placed on how to improve the performance of the government agencies responsible for enforcement.

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  • Moderator: Ross Eisenbrey, EPI
  • Sally Dworak-Fisher, Public Justice Center
  • Janice Fine, Rutgers Center for Innovation in Worker Organization
  • Laura Huizar, National Employment Law Project

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State and federal-state agendas for rebuilding manufacturing in 2017

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 6
  • Time: 11:20am-12:35pm
  • Session: 2.3

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This workshop will explore the potential for constructively reshaping U.S. manufacturing in the next Presidential administration. Scott Paul of the Alliance for AAM and Rob Scott of EPI will provide a perspective on the federal opportunities and challenges emerging in the wake of the Presidential elections. Stephen Herzenberg of Keystone Research Center will provide an overview of a “manufacturing state policy template” developed out of a just-completed six-state AAM-EPI-EARN project. Laura Dresser of COWS will facilitate discussion of how AAM-EPI-EARN might partner to shift the U.S. further towards federal, federal-state, and state policies supportive of high-wage U.S. manufacturing. How might EPI and EARN research, communications and advocacy achieve bigger shifts towards fair trade? How can we achieve more “Buy America” and “buy local” sourcing in a new infrastructure package? What is the key to increased retention and reshoring in the context of greater scrutiny of companies’ location and sourcing decisions?

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  • Moderator: Laura Dresser, COWS
  • Stephen Herzenberg, Keystone Research Center
  • Scott Paul, Alliance for American Manufacturing
  • Rob Scott, Economic Policy Institute

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Training Session: EARN 201 – Using microdata, what makes a great “State of Working X” report, and other data tools

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 7
  • Time: 11:20am-12:35pm
  • Session: 2.3

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This session will present data that are available and provide an opportunity for questions, answers, and suggestions on how to move forward with State of Working X (and other data-heavy) reports. The Current Population Survey (CPS) is the most commonly used data source by EARN groups. Statistics obtained from the CPS include employment shares, unemployment, earnings, hours of work, and other indicators, all available by a variety of demographic characteristics. The full CPS datasets are available for download on the EARN website, with variables recoded to provide consistency between years and between surveys. This session will illustrate methods for manipulating microdata with a series of sample STATA “.do” files. We will learn how to use Current Population Survey data to create customized tables telling stories that could not be told with published data alone. Topics will include defining the sample, calculating quintiles, and creating labor force statistics by demographic characteristics. Using current, pressing issues as examples, the session will help users better understand common problems and mistakes with using the CPS microdata.

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  • Janelle Jones, EPI/EARN

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Lunch and closing plenary: The post-election outlook and implications for our work in 2017

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  • Location: Landmark Ballroom 4
  • Time: 12:40-2:15pm
  • Session: Plenary

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The 2016 election cycle will be remembered for many challenges, yet savvy election observers will note that many of the issues motivating voters and central to policy discussions were key EARN issues: the availability of good jobs, the need for higher wages, addressing racial disparities, ensuring women’s rights in the workplace, acknowledging the dangers of bad trade policy, and creating a more inclusive economy. When the election is over, movements such as Black Lives Matter and the Fight for $15 will continue to challenge lawmakers to meaningfully tackle racial and gender inequities and the loss of worker bargaining power. In this closing plenary, national thought-leaders and campaign directors will describe how these social movements and the election are shaping the national policy agenda, and the implications of these developments for policymakers, analysts, and advocates at national, state, and local levels.

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[earn-speakers show]

  • Larry Mishel, Economic Policy Institute
  • Dianne Stewart, Economic Policy Institute / EARN
  • Heather Boushey, Washington Center for Equitable Growth
  • Connie M. Razza, Center for Popular Democracy 
  • Damon Silvers, AFL-CIO

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Presenters

Laura Barrett, Interfaith Worker Justice

@BarrettLaura

Before becoming Executive Director of Interfaith Worker Justice in 2016, Laura headed the Center for Health, Environment and Justice. Previously, she was the campaign director for Gamaliel, a community organizing training network, heading the Transportation Equity Network. Laura has also worked for the Center for Community Change, Housing Comes First, and the Missouri Public Interest Research Group. She has helped groups to win millions of dollars in public transportation funding and negotiated community benefits agreements and positive workforce development policies at the local, state, and federal levels. Laura is the recipient of the Women Who Move the Nation award from the Council of Minority Transportation Officials. She holds a Master’s in Social Work from Washington University, where she serves as adjunct faculty.

Phineas Baxandall, MassBudget

@PBaxandall

Before joining MassBudget, Phineas directed the Transportation and Tax & Budget programs for the U.S. Public Interest Research Group and its network of 30+ state affiliates. Earlier, Phineas was Assistant Director at the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. As a Teaching Fellow for eight years at Harvard’s Committee for Degrees in Social Studies, he lectured on social policy and political economy, winning several teaching awards and publishing extensively in academic journals. Phineas earned a Ph.D. from MIT in Political Science and a B.A. from Wesleyan University.

Ann Beeson, Center for Public Policy Priorities

@AnnBeesonCPPP

A renowned social justice lawyer, former philanthropy executive, and frequent public speaker and writer, Ann Beeson joined the Center in 2013. She was previously the Executive Director of U.S. Programs at the Open Society Foundations, where she promoted human rights, justice, and accountability nationwide. Beeson was the national Associate Legal Director of the American Civil Liberties Union, where she worked from 1995-2007. She argued twice before the U.S. Supreme Court, litigated numerous cases around the country, and launched groundbreaking programs to stop the erosion of civil liberties in the name of national security and to protect free speech and privacy on the Internet. A proud Texan, Beeson has embraced a wide range of innovative strategies to advance social change. She grew up in Dallas, Texas, and received undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Texas. Beeson obtained her law degree from Emory University School of Law, and served as law clerk to the Honorable Barefoot Sanders, then chief judge of the Northern District of Texas.

Noah Berger, Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center

@MassBudget

Noah Berger is president of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, an independent research organization that produces non-partisan policy research, analysis, and data-driven recommendations focused on improving the lives of low- and middle-income children and adults, strengthening our state’s economy, and enhancing the quality of life in Massachusetts. Prior to joining the center, Berger served as counsel and policy director for the Massachusetts Senate Committee on Ways and Means from 1993 to 1996 and as policy director for the Massachusetts Senate President from 1996 to 2002.

Noah serves on the advisory boards of the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center, the Economic Analysis Research Network, and the Tax Alliance for Economic Mobility. He graduated from Harvard College and has a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Kristian Blackmon, Missouri Jobs with Justice

@krisisblackstart

Kristian Blackmon is a native of St. Louis, Missouri. She is the St. Louis organizer at Missouri Jobs with Justice, a coalition of community, labor, student and religious groups committed to fighting together for economic justice in Missouri. A member of Saint John’s Church in St. Louis, Blackmon is a deacon for the church’s “Testimony” ministry, which leads evangelism and outreach work in the community. She is the creator of two projects, “Invisible No More,” which speaks to the plight of black women through the arts and lecture, and “I STILL love h.e.r.,” a celebration of women in hip hop. Blackmon describes herself as “a lover of the arts, music, traveling, writing, cartoons and God.” She believes that God has placed and positioned her to liberate, inspire and empower those with whom she comes into contact.

Amy Blouin, Missouri Budget Project

Amy Blouin is the founder and Executive Director of the Missouri Budget Project. Amy has a Master of Social Work from St. Louis University (1996), and a BA in Political Science and Religious Studies from Loras College, Dubuque Iowa (1991). Amy previously served as the Director of Advocacy for Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of St. Louis and as Government Relations Staff for the United Way of Greater St. Louis. Amy has also served as an adjunct professor at Saint Louis University, spent time working in Central America and with the Iowa Department of Economic Development European Office in Frankfurt, Germany. Amy has worked on state tax and fiscal policy issues for more than 15 years and has received regional and statewide recognition for her work. In 2012, the St. Louis Business Journal named Amy “One of the Most Influential St. Louisans.”

Ted Boettner, West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy

@WVpolicywonk

As the co-founding Executive Director of the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy, Ted brings a wealth of experience and understanding of state fiscal issues. In addition to running the Center, Ted is the author of numerous reports on state tax and budget issues, economic development, and family economic security, including the annual “State of Working West Virginia.” Ted frequently presents policy proposals to the West Virginia Legislature and testifies before committees. He also regularly addresses statewide civic groups on state tax, budget and economic policies and is frequently quoted in news stories on those topics. In 2011, The State Journal named Ted “one of the most influential businesses leaders” in West Virginia. Ted also serves on the board of directors of Cabin Creek Health Systems, Legal Aid of West Virginia, The Dunn Foundation, and Mountain State Justice. Ted holds a B.S. in journalism from West Virginia University and a M.A. in political science from the University of New Hampshire.

Lauren Bonds, Service Employees International Union (SEIU)

@SEIU

Lauren Bonds is an Assistant General Counsel at Service Employee’s International Union. She provides legal support to the Fight for 15 campaign.

Meg Bostrom, Topos Partnership

@MegBostrom

Meg Bostrom is a veteran communications strategist with a unique perspective resulting from her rich and varied experiences as communicator, public opinion analyst, advertising agency executive, and political consultant. As co-founder of the Topos Partnership, she has researched public opinion and analyzed communications strategies on a wide range of social issues.

Heather Boushey, Washington Center for Equitable Growth

@HBoushey

Heather Boushey is Executive Director and Chief Economist at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth. Her research focuses on economic inequality and public policy, specifically employment, social policy, and family economic well-being and her latest book is “Finding Time: The Economics of Work-Life Conflict” from Harvard University Press. The New York Times has called Boushey one of the “most vibrant voices in the field” and Politico twice named her one of the top 50 “thinkers, doers and visionaries transforming American politics.” She previously served as Chief Economist for Hillary Clinton’s transition team, and as an economist for the Joint Economic Committee of the U.S. Congress, the Center for Economic and Policy Research, and the Economic Policy Institute. She received her Ph.D. in economics from the New School for Social Research and her B.A. from Hampshire College.

Ilana Boivie, DC Fiscal Policy Institute

Ilana joined DCFPI in May 2015 as a Senior Policy Analyst. Her work focuses on strengthening job training and adult education, and on improving working conditions for people employed in DC. Previously, she worked as a Research Economist for the Communications Workers of America, where she served as the subject matter expert on retirement policy and provided bargaining and policy support on health care issues. Prior to that, she served as Director of Programs for the National Institute on Retirement Security. Ilana holds an M.A. in Economics from New Mexico State University and a B.A. in English from Binghamton University, where she graduated Magna Cum Laude.

Miya Saika Chen, Partnership for Working Families

@P4WF

Miya Saika Chen provides legal advice to city-based equitable economic development strategies. Previously, she was Economic Justice Staff Attorney at the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights of the San Francisco Bay Area, and worked at the plaintiffs’ law firm, Justice First, LLP. Miya worked in the federal government on increasing underserved Asian American and Pacific Islander access to programs and at the Service Employees International Union, providing research support for service worker organizing campaigns throughout Northern CA. She earned her B.A. from the University of California, San Diego, and her J.D. from American University, Washington College of Law.

Chandra Childers, Institute for Women’s Policy Research

Chandra Childers joined IWPR as a postdoctoral fellow in July of 2014.  She completed her bachelor’s in Human Development and Family Studies and her master’s in Sociology at Texas Tech University.  She completed her Ph.D. in Sociology at the University of Washington where her interests centered on the relationships between race, sex, and class and how these shape social and economic inequality, especially within labor markets.

David Cooper, Economic Policy Institute

@metacoop

David Cooper is the senior economic analyst at the Economic Policy Institute, where he conducts national and state-level research on the minimum wage, state labor markets, poverty, and wage and income trends. He is also the deputy director of the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN). David has been interviewed and cited for his research on the minimum wage, poverty, and U.S. economic trends by numerous local and national media, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, U.S. News and World Report, CNBC, and NPR. He holds a Master of Public Policy and a Bachelor of Arts in English and Government from Georgetown University.

Maggie Corser, Center for Popular Democracy

@MaggieCorser

Maggie Corser is a Research Analyst at the Center for Popular Democracy where she supports campaigns advancing immigrant justice, corporate accountability, and a fair workweek. Prior to joining CPD, Maggie worked at the Open Society Foundations and Amnesty International USA. Maggie’s background is in community-based participatory research and she spent four years on project studying health disparities faced by low-income families. Her published research has been cited by numerous publications including the Wall Street Journal, US News and World Reports, and the Pacific Standard Magazine. Maggie holds a BA from Michigan State University and an MA from The New School for Social Research.

Rachel Deutsch, Center for Popular Democracy

Rachel provides policy and strategic leadership on CPD’s economic justice campaigns, focusing on the Fair Workweek Initiative.  Before joining CPD, Rachel litigated cases involving labor and employment, elections, state and local government, and insurance regulation at Strumwasser & Woocher, a public interest law firm.  She previously clerked for Hon. Marsha S. Berzon on the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. Before law school, Rachel organized hospital workers with the Service Employees International Union. She is a graduate of Columbia Law School and Yale College. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband and son.

Tamara Draut, Dēmos

@tamaradraut

Tamara Draut is the Vice President of Policy and Research at the public policy organization Dēmos. Tamara is responsible for advancing the organization’s goal of building an America where we all have an equal say and equal chance through research, idea generation and policy development. A member of the Demos team since 2001, Tamara developed the organization’s groundbreaking work on household indebtedness, middle-class insecurity and the economic challenges facing young people. She is the author of Sleeping Giant: How America’s New Working Class Will Transform America and Strapped: Why America’s 20- and 30-Somethings Can’t Get Ahead.

Laura Dresser, COWS UW Madison

@highroadCOWS

Laura Dresser is Associate Director of COWS, a think-and-do tank at UW Madison. A labor economist and expert on low-wage work and workforce development systems, she has written about ways to build stronger labor market systems and worked extensively with labor, business, and community leaders in building them. Laura is currently working on issues surrounding care work and the connections between quality care and higher minimum wages.

Sally Dworak-Fisher, Public Justice Center

@SallyDwFisher

Sally Dworak-Fisher is an attorney at Maryland’s Public Justice Center, a nonprofit legal organization that pursues systemic change to build a just society.  Sally is the lead attorney of the Workplace Justice Project, which partners with low-wage workers, community and labor organizations, and fellow advocates to promote justice and equity in the workplace.  She and her team litigate in federal and state courts and advocate in the legislature for systemic reforms to strengthen workplace laws and ensure access to justice for all workers. Sally graduated with honors from University of Michigan Law School in 1997, where she was also an editor of the Michigan Journal of Race & Law, Coordinator of the National Lawyers Guild, and recipient of the Jane L. Mixer Award for her demonstrated commitment to social justice. Sally received her B.A. in Government with a concentration in International Relations from Cornell University.

Ross Eisenbrey, Economic Policy Institute

@RossEisenbrey

Ross Eisenbrey has been EPI’s vice president since 2012, researching and writing about labor policies, including collective bargaining, labor standards, retirement and immigration policy, and wage theft. Previously, he was a Commissioner on the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission, OSHA’s Policy Director, counsel on the U.S. Senate labor committee, general counsel of the House Education and Labor Committee, and legislative director for Cong. William D. Ford (D-Mich).

Janice Fine, Rutgers University

Janice Fine holds a Ph.D. from MIT in Political Science and is Associate Professor of Labor Studies and Employment Relations at the School of Management and Labor Relations, Rutgers University, where she teaches and writes about low-wage, immigrant labor in the U.S., historical and contemporary debates regarding federal immigration policy, dilemmas of labor standards enforcement, and innovative union and community organizing strategies. Fine is also a member of the graduate faculty in Political Science as well as the Department of Latino and Hispanic Caribbean Studies at Rutgers.Prior to coming to Rutgers in 2005, Fine worked as a community, labor, and electoral organizer for more than 25 years. Fine’s ground-breaking book, Worker Centers: Organizing Communities at the Edge of the Dream, was released in January of 2006 by Cornell University Press and the Economic Policy Institute.

Adine Forman, Hospitality Training Academy Los Angeles

@LosAngelesHTA

Adine Forman is the Executive Director of the Hospitality Training Academy (HTA), a nonprofit labor-management partnership/Taft-Hartley fund that provides benefits to both employers and the UNITE HERE Local 11 labor union, serving Los Angeles and Orange Counties. The HTA trains and upgrades the skills of thousands of UNITE HERE Local 11 hospitality and food service workers. Adine also serves on both the Los Angeles County and City Workforce Investment Boards (WIBs), Los Angeles Workforce Systems Collaborative, the Liberty Hill Community Funding Board, the City of Santa Monica Cradle to Career Initiative, and the Parent Board of Windward School.

Allyson Fredericksen, People’s Action Institute

@allysonf

Allyson Fredericksen is the deputy director of research at People’s Action Institute. She has produced state and national reports on living wage standards, student debt, payday lending, voting rights, and the criminalization of debt. Her research has been featured in local and national media outlets including the New Yorker, Bloomberg BNA, the Huffington Post, Forbes, Seattle Times, Puget Sound Business Journal, and more. Allyson is the lead author on the Job Gap Economic Prosperity Series, and of Jobs After Jail, a recent report highlighting legislative barriers to employment for people with records.

Allan Freyer, North Carolina Budget and Tax Center

@Allan Freyer

Allan Freyer is Director of the Workers’ Rights Project at the North Carolina Budget and Tax Center. He has over a decade of experience in federal, state, and local economic development policy, including service as a policy advisor to three Members of the United States Congress and as an independent economic development consultant to nonprofits, universities, and state and local government agencies. He has a Bachelor’s in Political Science from Duke University and a Masters in City & Regional Planning from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where he is also pursuing his Ph.D. in Economic Development.

Josh Goodman, Pew Trusts

Josh Goodman helps lead The Pew Charitable Trusts’ work to make state tax incentives more effective and accountable. He has served as a primary researcher and writer for several Pew reports, including studies that assess practices for states to evaluate tax incentives and avoid budget challenges when using incentives. He also provides technical assistance to lawmakers proposing legislation to require regular and rigorous evaluation of tax incentives and to state analysts studying the results of incentives. Previously, Goodman was a staff writer for Stateline, Pew’s daily news service on state government, where he reported on tax and budget issues. Before joining Pew, he covered state and local government as a staff writer at Governing magazine. He holds a bachelor’s degree in politics from the University of Virginia.

Colin Gordon, University of Iowa

@ColinGordon6

Colin Gordon writes on the history of American public policy and political economy.  He is the author of Growing Apart: A Political History of American Inequality (Institute for Policy Studies, 2013); Mapping Decline: St. Louis and the Fate of the American City (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008); Dead on Arrival: The Politics of Health in Twentieth Century America (Princeton University Press, 2003), and New Deals: Business, Labor and Politics, 1920-1935 (Cambridge University Press, 1994).  He has written for the Nation, In these Times, Z Magazine, Atlantic Cities, and Dissent (where he is a regular contributor).  His digital projects include Mapping Decline, an interactive mapping project based on his St. Louis research; Digital Johnson County, a mapping collaboration with the UI Libraries, the Office of State Archeologist, the DNR, and the State Historical Society of Iowa; and The Telltale Chart, a data visualization project focusing on historical and recent economic data.

He is a senior research consultant at the Iowa Policy Project, for which he has written or co-written reports on health coverage, economic development, and wages and working conditions (including the biennial State of Working Iowa series). Colin Gordon received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1990.  His web page is www.colin-gordon.org

Joe Grady, Topos Partnership

@JoePolicy

Joseph Grady, Ph.D. is a cognitive linguist whose academic research and publications have focused on the role of metaphor in thought and communication. Before founding Topos, Grady taught linguistics at Georgetown University and the University of Maryland, and also spent a number of years as a consultant helping to analyze and develop brand names. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley.

Darnell Grisby, American Public Transportation Association

@darnellgrisby

As Director of Policy Development and Research for the American Public Transportation Association, Darnell was the primary author of multiple research reports, manages APTA’s extensive statistics efforts, and assists APTA’s government affairs and communications teams. Before APTA, Darnell worked as Deputy Policy Director at Reconnecting America, Legislative Director for a member of the California State Assembly, a lobbyist for a multinational corporation, and a Budget and Policy Analyst for the City of New York. He is active in the Transportation Research Board (TRB) and the Urban Land Institute (ULI), where he completed a year-long leadership program. Named among the “Top 40 Under 40” by Mass Transit magazine, he holds a Masters from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, and a B.A. from UCLA.

Kim Haddow, Haddow Communications, Inc.

Kim Haddow is the president of Haddow Communications, Inc., a New Orleans-based  company specializing in strategic media planning, messaging, and developing research-driven content, branding, and advertising materials for nonprofits.  Haddow also worked as the National Communications Director for the Sierra Club and at Greer, Margolis, Mitchell, Burns (GMMB), a Washington, DC- based media consulting firm, advising political campaigns and nonprofits.  Haddow began her career at WWL-AM in New Orleans where she worked as a reporter, assignment editor and managed the news department.

Hannah Halbert, Policy Matters Ohio

@HannahHalbert

Hannah Halbert is a policy liaison and the lead workforce researcher at Policy Matters Ohio. Hannah came to Policy Matters from the Equal Justice Foundation and the Legal Aid Society of Columbus, where–in both places–she represented low-income consumers who had been victimized by predatory lenders of different types. Hannah has a Master of  Nonprofit Management and a law degree from Hamline University. Her undergraduate degree is from Transylvania University.

Anna Haley-Lock, Rutgers University School of Social Work

@ahaleylock

Dr. Anna Haley-Lock is an Associate Professor at Rutgers University School of Social Work, having also served on faculties at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and University of Washington. Her research investigates how organizations are shaped by a range of internal and external forces, and in turn shape the lives of individuals, families, and communities. Within that emphasis, she studies employers’ choices about designing, managing, and rewarding jobs, and the impacts of those choices on employment outcomes experienced by organizations and their workforces. She focuses on low-wage jobs in for-profit, nonprofit and public settings, including retail stores, restaurants, long-term care facilities, domestic violence services programs, the US Postal Service, and occupations disproportionately held by vulnerable groups of workers such as women and primary or sole family caregivers. She draws on perspectives from sociology, political science and industrial relations/management to frame her work theoretically, and utilizes quantitative and qualitative methods. Dr. Haley-Lock’s findings have informed practice by identifying and assessing strategies for changing workplaces and public employment policies to promote worker, family, and community economic and social well-being.

Amy Hanauer, Policy Matters Ohio

@amyhanauer

Amy Hanauer is founding director of Policy Matters Ohio, which creates a more vibrant, equitable, sustainable and inclusive Ohio through research, media, coalition and policy work. With more than 60 reports and 600 news stories each year, Policy Matters improves lives and communities. Its work has helped raise the minimum wage, defend worker rights, establish clean energy standards, and expand Medicaid. Amy has a master’s degree from UW-Madison and a B.A. from Cornell. Before starting Policy Matters, she did policy work in Wisconsin, Colorado and Washington D.C. Amy serves on boards for Dēmos, EARN, State Priorities Partnership, and Emerald Cities Cleveland.

Clarissa Hayward, Washington University

Clarissa Rile Hayward is a contemporary political theorist whose research and teaching focus on theories of power, democratic theory, theories of identity, and American urban politics.

Her most recent book, How Americans Make Race: Stories, Institutions, Spaces (Cambridge University Press, 2013), was the winner of the American Political Science Association’s prize for the Best Book in Urban Politics. Hayward is also author of De-Facing Power (Cambridge University Press, 2000) and co-editor (with Todd Swanstrom) of Justice and the American Metropolis (University of Minnesota Press, 2011). In addition, she has published many articles in edited volumes and in journals, such as the American Political Science Review, Constellations, Contemporary Political Theory, the Journal of Politics, Polity, and Political Theory. Her research has been supported by the National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton.

Alexander Hertel-Fernandez

@awh

Alexander Hertel-Fernandez is a political scientist studying the political economy of the United States, with an emphasis on the politics of organized interests, especially business. He is a member of the National Academy of Social Insurance, and was elected to the board of that organization in 2016. In 2016, he was named one of Pacific Standard’s “30 under 30” thinkers. Alex holds a B.A. with honors in political science from Northwestern University and spent two years working at the Economic Policy Institute before pursuing his doctorate. Alex received my Ph.D. in Government and Social Policy from Harvard University in 2016.

Stephen Herzenberg, Keystone Research Center

@herzenberg

Stephen Herzenberg is Executive Director of Keystone Research Center (KRC) and holds a Ph.D. in economics from MIT. At KRC, in addition to research and policy writing, Stephen helped architect and implement a Pennsylvania workforce reform founded on investment in “Industry (training) Partnerships,” partnered with “high road” early childhood education unions and other innovative union organizing/bargaining, and participated in a project leading to a national apprenticeship for “Maker Professionals.” Since 2013, KRC has partnered with the National Public Pension Coalition to help safeguard public pensions in 10 states.

Steve Hill, Service Employees International Union (SEIU)

Steve Hill is a policy director for the public services division of SEIU. Prior to joining SEIU, Steve ran a state policy group and was a member of this fine EARN network.

David Howell, The New School

David R. Howell is a professor of economics and public policy, and directs the Doctoral Program in Public and Urban Policy at The New School. He is a Faculty Research Fellow at the Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (The New School), and a Research Scholar at the Political Economy Research Institute (U-Mass Amherst). His research focuses on institutions and labor market outcomes. David holds a Ph.D. in economics from The New School.

Laura Huizar, National Employment Law Project

@lhuizar06

Laura Huizar joined NELP in 2015.  Prior to that, she was a Marvin M. Karpatkin Fellow with the American Civil Liberties Union’s Racial Justice Program.  She also completed an Equal Justice Works Fellowship at LatinoJustice PRLDEF, where she represented low-wage immigrant workers in litigation and assisted community groups seeking policy change.  Prior to law school, Laura worked at JUNTA for Progressive Action in New Haven, CT on local economic development and immigrant worker advocacy.

Janelle Jones, Economic Policy Institute

@janellecj

Janelle Jones joined the Economic Policy Institute in 2016. She is an economic analyst working on a variety of labor market topics within EPI’s Program on Race, Ethnicity, and the Economy (PREE) and the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN). She was previously a research associate at the Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR), where she worked on topics including racial inequality, unemployment, job quality, and unions. Her research has been cited in The New Yorker, The Economist, Harper’s, The Washington Post, The Review of Black Political Economy, and other publications. She previously worked as an economist at the Bureau of Economic Analysis. Janelle holds a Masters in Applied Economics from Illinois State University and a Bachelors of Science in mathematics from Spelman College.

Pamela Joshi, Institute for Child, Youth and Family Policy

@JoshiPam

Pamela Joshi is a social policy analyst and evaluator with expertise in programs designed to improve low-income families’ outcomes in economic mobility, family stability, child care and housing. Her research focuses broadly on family economic security, including how: 1) job quality varies among workers; 2) working conditions and nonstandard schedules influence families’ and children’s health and economic outcomes; 3) state social policy variation affects families and children; and 4) racial/ethnic disparities in employment structure and/or social determinants of health contribute to differential impacts. Pam seeks to identify effective policies that improve outcomes for all families and reduce racial/ethnic disparities.

David Dyssegaard Kallick, Fiscal Policy Institute

@ddkallick

David Dyssegaard Kallick joined the Fiscal Policy Institute in New York as Senior Fellow in 2001. Since 2007, he has directed FPI’s Immigration Research Initiative. Prior to his work with the Fiscal Policy Institute, Kallick was Senior Fellow at the Preamble Center, and before that spent eight years as editor of Social Policy magazine. He is a frequent commentator in the media, and his writings have been published in the New York Times, Daily News, Newsday, and a wide range of other media outlets. He is a graduate of Yale University.

Samuel Krinsky, 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East

Sam Krinsky is a Senior Policy Analyst at the health care workers’ union 1199SEIU, where his work helps further the union’s advocacy on health and economic policy in New York State. Separately, Sam maintains an active research agenda through collaborations with university and medical faculty. He presents frequently at health policy conferences and has published in leading medical and health economics journals. He received his M.A. in Economics from NYU.

Derek Laney, Missourians Organizing for Reform  and Empowerment

@organizemo

Derek Laney is the Co-Executive Director of Missourians Organizing for Reform and Empowerment (MORE). He has been involved with the National Fed Up campaign since its introduction to community organizers a year ago. As an organizer with MORE, Derek helped to strategize and build the movement infrastructure for the Ferguson uprising that later grew into the national Black Lives Matter movement. Derek comes from a 20-year career in social service, working with a range of various populations. Derek is the co-coordinator of the Cowry Collective Timebank in St. Louis, a life coach, and the father of a nine year old daughter.

Greg LeRoy, Good Jobs First

@GregLeRoy4

Dubbed “America’s chief whistle-blower” on state and local economic development subsidies, Greg LeRoy founded and directs Good Jobs First, a national resource center promoting transparency and accountability in economic development and smart growth for working families. Good Jobs First is the home of Subsidy Tracker, the unique database of federal, state and local subsidy awards. With more than 30 years’ experience, he is the author of The Great American Jobs Scam: Corporate Tax Dodging and the Myth of Job Creation (2005) and No More Candy Store: States and Cities Making Job Subsidies Accountable (1994).

David Madland, Center for American Progress

@DavidMadland

David Madland is a Senior Fellow and the Senior Advisor to the American Worker Project at American Progress. He has written extensively about the economy and American politics on a range of topics, including the middle class, economic inequality, retirement policy, labor unions, and workplace standards such as the minimum wage. Madland is the author of Hollowed Out: Why the Economy Doesn’t Work without a Strong Middle Class, which was published by the University of California Press in 2015. He is the co-author of Interest Groups in American Campaigns, a book about the role and influence of interest groups in American democracy, and is the author of several academic articles. He has worked on economic policy for Rep. George Miller (D-CA) and has consulted for several labor unions. At American Progress, he previously served as the Managing Director for Economic Policy and the Director of the American Worker Project. Madland has a doctorate in government from Georgetown University and received his bachelor’s degree from the University of California, Berkeley.

Tracy McCreery, Missouri State Representative

Tracy McCreery represents part of St. Louis County in the Missouri House of Representatives. She was elected to her first two-year term in November 2014. She previously served one year in the Missouri House after being elected in the 2011 Special Election. Prior to her legislative duties, Rep. McCreery was a district aide and a volunteer coordinator for State Senator Joan Bray and served in the administration of Governor Bob Holden. She has held positions in sales, sales training, and management in the pharmaceutical, telecommunications and health care industries. Rep. McCreery received a degree in Marketing from the Ohio State University.

Claire McKenna, National Employment Law Project

@NELPNews

Now entering her seventh year with NELP, Claire McKenna conducts research on unemployment insurance policy and trends in unemployment, employment, and job quality. Claire has researched or written about various reforms to the federal-state unemployment insurance program, public employment services, work sharing, long-term unemployment, occupational wage trends, and non-standard employment. Claire and her work have been cited by various state and national media. Before joining NELP, Claire conducted research on child and family poverty.

Lawrence Mishel, Economic Policy Institute

@LarryMishel

Larry Mishel came to the Economic Policy Institute in 1987. As EPI’s first research director, and then as vice president and now president, he has played a significant role in building EPI’s research capabilities and reputation. He has researched, written and spoken widely on the economy and economic policy as it affects middle- and low-income families. He is principal author of a major research volume, The State of Working America, (published every even-numbered year since 1988), which provides a comprehensive overview of the U.S. labor market and living standards. A nationally recognized economist, Mishel is regularly called on to testify and provide economic briefings to members of Congress and appears regularly as a commentator on the economy in print and broadcast media.

Sam Munger, State Innovation Exchange (SiX)

@stateinnovation

Sam Munger is Senior Advisor and Director of Special Projects at SiX. Sam’s experience includes working for a prominent Democratic polling firm, a national consumer advocacy watchdog, and The Nation magazine, as well as John Kerry’s 2004 Presidential campaign. He was a founding member and head of outreach for the American Legislative and Issue Campaign Exchange (ALICE) and Managing Director of the Center for State Innovation (CSI). He holds a JD from NYU School of Law and clerked for two years in the Southern District of New York.

Sarita Nair, Office of the State Auditor of New Mexico

Sarita Nair serves as Chief Government Accountability Officer and General Counsel for the Office of the State Auditor of New Mexico. Nair joined the OSA after being a private practice attorney, representing private companies and public entities in business and governance matters since 2004. Before entering private practice, Sarita clerked for Judge Lynn Pickard at the New Mexico Court of Appeals. She graduated magna cum laude from the University of New Mexico School of Law. Prior to her law career, Sarita worked in the field of international development and consulted on policy initiatives for a number of organizations including the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean and the New York City Parks and Recreation Department. She earned a master’s degree from the University of New Mexico School of Community and Regional Planning and earned her bachelor’s degree from Wesleyan University.

Laura Orlando, Resource Institute for Low Entropy Systems (RILES)

@LFO

Laura Orlando is the director of a Boston-based nonprofit, the Resource Institute for Low Entropy Systems (RILES), that works in partnership with communities to protect public health and the environment. She is an adjunct assistant professor of environmental health at the Boston University School of Public Health, and a regular contributor to the publication In These Times on public health and water issues, and served several years on the editorial board for Dollars & Sense magazine. She holds a civil engineering degree from the University of Michigan and a masters degree from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government.

Sejal Parikh, Working Washington

@SejalWW

As Executive Director of Working Washington, Sejal Parikh has played a central role in several groundbreaking campaigns to advance workers rights, most recently leading the strategy, policy, and mobilization effort which won Seattle’s landmark secure scheduling law for baristas, food, and retail workers. Prior to that, Sejal headed up Seattle’s fast food worker campaign from the first strikes to the historic vote to pass the nation’s first citywide $15 minimum wage law. Sejal has also led corporate accountability campaigns which closed a state tax loophole for big banks, and moved Amazon to dump ALEC and improve warehouse working conditions.

Scott Paul, Alliance for American Manufacturing

@ScottPaulAAM

Scott Paul directs the Alliance for American Manufacturing (AAM), a partnership established in 2007 by some of America’s leading manufacturers and the United Steelworkers union. Scott and AAM have worked to make American manufacturing and “Made in America” top-of-mind concerns for voters and our national leaders through effective advocacy and data-driven research. Scott has hosted more than 80 “Keep It Made in America” events, including a presidential candidates’ forum on manufacturing, and frequently testifies before House and Senate Committees. Scott comments frequently on television and radio news shows, regularly blogs at Huffington Post, and is co-author of ReMaking America (2013).

Robert Pleasure, North America’s Building Trades Unions

Robert Pleasure is Special Assistant to the President of the North America’s Building Trades Unions, AFL-CIO. Prior to that he served as Executive Director of a number of institutes affiliated with the AFL-CIO and North America’s Building Trades Unions, including the George Meany Center for Labor Studies (now the National Labor College), CPWR (the Building Trades Health and Safety Research Institute), and the AFL-CIO Center for Working Capital. He worked with John Sweeney, former President of the AFL-CIO, as Assistant to the President for Education and Training. He graduated from the College of the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Michigan Law School, and completed an M.Sc. degree at the London School of Economics.

Anne Price, Insight Center for Community Economic Development

@InsightCCED

Anne Price currently serves as the first woman President of the Insight Center. Anne has spent over 20 years working in the public sector on issues including child welfare, hunger, welfare reform, workforce development, community development, and higher education. Anne previously led the Closing the Racial Wealth Gap initiative at the Insight Center, elevating the voices and opinions of experts of color in national economic debates and policy making. Her tireless work has brought the issue of the racial wealth gap into mainstream consciousness and vernacular with an explosion of media coverage of the data and research quantifying racial differences in wealth accumulation. Anne possesses a deep understanding of the relationship between data analysis, program development, and public policy, enabling her to effectively communicate complex social issues, data findings, and programmatic trends across a wide range of disciplines and perspectives. Anne holds a B.A. in Economics from Hampton University and a Master’s Degree in Urban Affairs and Public Policy from the Milano School of Management and Urban Policy in New York City.

Victoria Ramirez, Working Partnerships USA

@SrtaZerimar

Victoria supports economic and workforce policy campaigns impacting Silicon Valley’s working families and middle class, focused on increasing economic opportunities for underrepresented communities. Prior to joining Working Partnerships USA, she was with Services, Immigrant Rights and Education Network (SIREN), uplifting and fostering a positive immigrant narrative through media and community. Victoria previously served as Vice-Chair for Santa Clara County’s Commission on the Status of Women, and on the executive boards for the California Young Democrats Latino Caucus and the Silicon Valley Young Democrats. She is a Master of Public Administration candidate at the University of San Francisco, and a graduate of San José State University.

Connie M. Razza, Center for Popular Democracy

@ConnieRazza

Connie directs CPD’s broad-ranging research efforts pertaining to immigrant and civil rights, economic and community justice, and good government. In addition to researching on CPD-driven projects, her Strategic Research Department also helps partner organizations meet their research needs. Previously, she worked for Community Labor United (CLU), a coalition of base-building community organizations and labor unions in Boston. At CLU, she directed research and policy development on campaigns for transit justice and fair contracting practices throughout Massachusetts. She has been a strategic research campaigner for more than a decade, working primarily on campaign design and implementation for labor union organizing drives. At UNITE HERE, Connie led research in support of the unionization of workers at a national healthcare laundry company. She also served the New York City Council as its Senior Policy Analyst for health issues. She holds a B.A. from Georgetown University and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of California at Los Angeles.

Kayla Reed, Movement for Black Lives & St. Louis Action Council

@RE_invent_ED

Kayla Reed was working as a pharmacy technician when she became involved with groups including the Organization for Black Struggle and Missourians Organizing for Reform and Empowerment after leading her own surprise demonstration in October 2014.

Michael Reich, University of California at Berkeley

Michael Reich is Professor of Economics and Chair of the Center on Wage and Employment Dynamics at the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment (IRLE) of the University of California at Berkeley. He served as Director of IRLE from 2004 to 2015. Reich received his Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard. His research publications cover numerous areas of labor economics and political economy, including the economics of racial inequality, the analysis of labor market segmentation, historical stages in U.S. labor markets and social structures of accumulation, high performance workplaces, union-management cooperation, Japanese labor-management systems, living wages and minimum wages.

Reich’s publications include 17 books and monographs, including When Mandates Work: Raising Labor Standards at the Local Level, with K. Jacobs and M.Dietz, University of California Press, 2014.

Marilyn Reyes Scales, VOCAL-NY

Marilyn Reyes-Scales is a community leader with VOCAL-NY, a grassroots organization that builds the power of low-income people impacted by HIV/AIDS, the drug war, and mass incarceration. Through Marilyn’s involvement with VOCAL-NY, she has been a leading voice on the campaign to pass the NYC Fair Chance Act, and stood next to Mayor de Blasio as he signed the bill into law in June of 2015. Marilyn also works as a public health outreach worker and her activism has been featured in the New York Times, the New York Daily News, NBC News, and Al-Jazeera.

Nari Rhee, UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education

@n_rhee

Dr. Rhee’s current research focuses on the retirement crisis facing California and the US in the context of declining pension coverage, and policies to improve the retirement income prospects of low- and middle- wage workers. Before returning to the Labor Center in 2014, she served for two years as Manager of Research at the National Institute on Retirement Security. Dr. Rhee writes widely on issues related to pensions and retirement security, including public pension reform, international pension systems, and retirement plan design. Her analysis of the retirement savings crisis and its racial dimensions has received broad media coverage and informed state and national policy debates.

Michelle Natividad Rodriguez, National Employment Law Project

@michnrodriguez

Michelle Natividad Rodriguez is a senior staff attorney at the National Employment Law Project, where she leads efforts to expand job opportunities for people with records through fair-chance employment. She has provided legal and technical assistance for fair-chance laws and policies to over 100 jurisdictions, engaging stakeholders from grassroots organizers to policymakers. Ms. Rodriguez is the lead author of the seminal report, 65 Million Need Not Apply, and Unlicensed and Untapped, a recent report on removing barriers to state occupational licenses for people with records.

Jessica Schieder, Economic Policy Institute

Jessica Schieder joined EPI in 2015. As a research assistant, she supports the research of EPI’s economists on topics such as the labor market, wage trends, executive compensation, and inequality. She also provides support to the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN). Prior to joining EPI, Jessica worked at the Center for Effective Government (formerly OMB Watch) as a revenue and spending policies analyst, where she examined how budget and tax policy decisions impact working families. She holds a bachelor’s in International Political Economy from Georgetown University.

Zach Schiller, Policy Matters Ohio

Zach Schiller is the research director of Policy Matters Ohio. Prior to coming to Policy Matters in 2001, Zach worked for more than two decades researching and writing about the Ohio economy as a business reporter for The Plain Dealer and Business Week. His education includes a master’s degree in journalism from Columbia University and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan. For Policy Matters, Zach has written about foreclosures, economic development, job growth, unemployment insurance, tax policy and other issues. He is a member of the board of managers of the Ohio Poverty Law Center.

Ari Schwartz, DC Jobs with Justice

@arischwartz

Ari Schwartz is the Lead Organizer at DC Jobs With Justice and coordinates the Just Hours campaign to win full-time hours and stable work schedules in the District. During his time at DC JWJ, Ari has worked on campaigns against wage theft, raising the minimum wage, and the Walmart: Respect DC effort. He has worked with the Laborers’ union and is a proud member of IFPTE Local 70, the union for non-profit workers. Born and raised in Maryland, Ari now lives in Ward 5 in Washington, DC.

Rob Scott, Economic Policy Institute

@RobScott_EPI

Rob Scott joined EPI in 1996. His research covers international economics, trade and manufacturing policies and their impacts on working people in the United States and other countries, the economic impacts of foreign investment, and currency manipulation. He has published widely in academic journals and the popular press, including The Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, The International Review of Applied Economics, The Stanford Law and Policy Review, and The Los Angeles Times, Newsday, USA Today, The Baltimore Sun, The Washington Times, and other newspapers. Rob appears frequently in the electronic media, including NPR, CNN, Bloomberg, and the BBC.

Zach Silk, Civic Ventures

@civicskunkworks

Zach Silk is the President and Chief Troublemaker for Civic Ventures. He oversees strategy, outreach, and policy development. He is an experienced civic leader and entrepreneur. Silk’s most notable recent successes include managing the successful campaign to pass and defend Washington State’s marriage equality law in 2012 (Approve Referendum 74) and co-founding the Washington Alliance for Gun Responsibility and managing Initiative 594, the successful ballot measure that requires background checks on all gun sales.

Damon Silvers, AFL-CIO

@DamonSilvers

Damon A. Silvers is the Director of Policy and Special Counsel for the AFL-CIO. He joined the AFL-CIO as Associate General Counsel in 1997. Mr. Silvers serves on a pro bono basis as a Special Assistant Attorney General for the state of New York. Mr. Silvers is also a member of the Investor Advisory Committee of the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Treasury Department’s Financial Research Advisory Committee, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board’s Standing Advisory Group and its Investor Advisory Group. Mr. Silvers served as the Deputy Chair of the Congressional Oversight Panel for TARP from 2008 to 2011. Between 2006 and 2008, Mr. Silvers served as the Chair of the Competition Subcommittee of the United States Treasury Department Advisory Committee on the Auditing Profession and as a member of the United States Treasury Department Investor’s Practice Committee of the President’s Working Group on Financial Markets. Prior to working for the AFL-CIO, Mr. Silvers worked for the Harvard Union of Clerical and Technical Workers, the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers, and as a law clerk at the Delaware Court of Chancery for Chancellor William T. Allen and Vice-Chancellor Bernard Balick.

Theda Skocpol, Harvard University

Theda Skocpol is the Victor S. Thomas Professor of Government and Sociology at Harvard University. At Harvard, she has served as Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (2005-2007) and as Director of the Center for American Political Studies (2000-2006). Skocpol’s work covers an unusually broad spectrum of topics including both comparative politics (States and Social Revolutions, 1979) and American politics (Protecting Soldiers and Mothers: The Political Origins of Social Policy in the United States, 1992). She has recently launched new projects on the transformations of U.S. federal policies in the Obama era. Theda holds a doctorate from Harvard University.

Andrew Stettner, The Century Foundation

@pelhamprog

Andrew Stettner has more than 20 years of experience modernizing workforce protections and social insurance programs, including community organizing, research, policy, and program development. At the National Employment Law project, he spearheaded a decade-long effort to modernize the unemployment insurance safety net and in 2010, he was elected to the National Academy of Social Insurance and received the Jewish Funds for Justice Cornerstone Award for outstanding contribution to social justice by leaders under the age of 40. A the Century Foundation, Andrew does research on unemployment insurance, the child care workforce, tax credits, job training, and child poverty.

Dianne Stewart, Economic Policy Institute & Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN)

Dianne Stewart leads the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN), a national network of more than 60 state-level policy research and advocacy organizations coordinated by EPI. Prior to joining EPI in 2016, she created Indivisible, a nonprofit dedicated to building public understanding of the importance of coming together through government to address critical challenges in our communities, states, and nation. Stewart also created and led Public Works, a nonprofit charged with building public support for government programs and services across the country. She founded and led the Texas-based Center for Public Policy Priorities, one of the original 10 State Priorities Partnership organizations (coordinated by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities) and an early member of both EARN and the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Kids Count network. Dianne holds a Masters in Social Work and Bachelors of Arts from the University of Texas at Austin.

Mary Beth Salomone Testa, MBST Solutions & the National Association for Family Child Care

@MaryBethTesta

Mary Beth Salomone Testa has more than 15 years of experience in team building, advocacy and policy development with expertise in connecting policy and practice. Mary Beth has led advocacy campaigns from California to Florida, Ohio to Arizona, and at the federal level. Mary Beth has worked on federal and state policy and advocacy with child care providers, child care resource and referral agencies, home visiting programs, and the Children’s Defense Fund. She has also presented at national and state conferences on advocacy strategy as well as state and federal child care and early education policy.

Remy Trupin, Topos Partnership

@remy_trupin

Remy Trupin is a creative, strategic, and entrepreneurial leader with extensive policy advocacy experience.  In addition to his work with the Topos Partnership, he is the Advocacy Catalyst Fellow at Philanthropy Northwest. Remy was the founding executive director of the Washington State Budget & Policy Center.  He brings strategic insight from working with organizations and coalitions developing and implementing legislative advocacy, communication and ballot campaigns.

Renell Weathers, Michigan League for Public Policy (MLPP)

As Communication Engagement Director, Renell works with organizations throughout the state in connecting the impact of budget and tax policies to their communities. She is a graduate of the Leadership Institute for State-based Advocates from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Prior to coming to the League, she worked as Senior District Representative for a U.S. Congressman where she collaborated with a diverse array of community leaders, agencies, grassroots organizations, and local units of government. Renell’s career has been devoted to improving the results for families by promoting access to economic opportunities.

Rev. Starsky Wilson, Deaconess Foundation

The Reverend Starsky D. Wilson is a pastor, philanthropist and activist pursuing God’s vision of community marked by justice, peace and love. He is president & CEO of Deaconess Foundation, pastor of Saint John’s Church (The Beloved Community) and co-chair of the Ferguson Commission.

Deaconess is a faith-based grant making organization devoted to making child well-being a civic priority in the St. Louis region. From a corpus of approximately $50 million, the foundation has invested more than $76 million to advance its mission in the area. Starsky’s leadership has birthed a dynamic community capacity building model, aligning policy advocacy, organizing, and community engagement with grantmaking.

[/earn-section][earn-section id="attendees-by-state" hide]

Attendees (by state)

Alabama

Alabama Arise

  • Stephen Stetson

Arkansas

Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families

  • Eleanor Wheeler

California

East Bay Alliance for a Sustainable Economy

  • Asha DuMonthier

Hospitality Training Academy (HTA)

  • Adine Forman

LAANE- Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy

  • Jon Zerolnick

National Employment Law Project

  • Michelle Natividad Rodriguez

Partnership for Working Families

  • Miya Saika Chen

UC Berkeley 

  • Michael Reich
  • Sarah Thomason
  • Ken Jacobs
  • Sylvia Allegretto

USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE)

  • Vanessa Carter
  • Justin Scoggins
  • Pamela Stephens
  • Madeline Wander

Working Partnerships USA

  • Victoria Ramirez

Colorado

Colorado Center on Law and Policy

  • Jesus Loayza

Colorado Fiscal Institute

  • Kathy White

Florida

Research Institute on Social and Economic Policy- Florida International University

  • Alí Bustamante

Georgia

Georgia Budget and Policy Institute

  • Wesley Tharpe

Hawaii

Hawaii Appleseed Center for Law and Economic Justice

  • Gavin Thornton

Illinois

Center for Community Change

  • Chirag Mehta

Center for Tax and Budget Accountability

  • Danielle Stanley

Voices for Illinois Children

  • Tasha Cruzat

Indiana

Indiana Institute for Working Families

  • Andrew Bradley
  • Jessica Fraser

Iowa

Iowa Policy Project

  • Peter Fisher
  • Colin Gordon

Kentucky

Kentucky Center for Economic Policy

  • Jason Bailey
  • Anna Baumann
  • Dustin Pugel
  • Ashley Spalding

Louisiana

Haddow Communications

  • Kim Haddow

Maryland

Maryland Center on Economic Policy

  • Chris Meyer
  • Benjamin Orr
  • Kali Schumitz

Public Justice Center

  • Sally Dworak-Fisher

Massachusetts

Brandeis University

  • Maura Baldiga
  • Pam Joshi

Community Labor United

  • Sarah Jimenez

Harvard University

  • Theda Skocpol

Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center

  • Phineas Baxandall
  • Noah Berger
  • Nicole Rodriguez
  • Kurt Wise

RILES

  • Laura Orlando

Michigan

Michigan League for Public Policy

  • Peter Ruark
  • Renell Weathers

Minnesota

Minnesota Budget Project

  • Clark Biegler
  • Ben Horowitz

Mississippi

HOPE

  • Molly Bashay

Missouri

Deaconess Foundation

  • Rev. Starsky Wilson

Interfaith Worker Justice

  • Laura Barrett

Jesuit Social Research Institute

  • Jeanie Donovan

Missouri Budget Project

  • Amy Blouin
  • Mike Sutherland

Missouri Jobs with Justice

  • Kristian Blackmon

Missourians Organizing for Reform and Empowerment

  • Derek Laney

Movement for Black Lives & St. Louis Action Council

  • Kayla Reed

St. Louis Regional Chamber

  • Tim Alexander

State of Missouri

  • Tracy McCreery

New Hampshire

New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute

  • Phil Sletten

New Jersey

New Jersey Policy Perspective

  • Jon Whiten

Rutgers University

  • Janice Fine
  • Anna Haley-Lock

New Mexico

New Mexico Voices for Children

  • Gerard Bradley

Office of the State Auditor of New Mexico

  • Sarita Nair

New York

1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East

  • Samuel Krinsky

Center for Popular Democracy

  • Maggie Corser
  • Connie Razza

Columbia University

  • Alexander Hertel-Fernandez

Community Service Society of New York

  • Harold Stolper

Demos

  • Tamara Draut
  • Robbie Hiltonsmith

Fiscal Policy Institute

  • David Kallick
  • Cyierra Roldan

National Employment Law Project

  • Laura Huizar
  • Claire McKenna

The New School

  • David Howell

The Century Foundation

  • Andrew Stettner

VOCAL-NY

  • Marilyn Reyes-Scales

North Carolina

North Carolina Justice Center Workers’ Rights Project

  • Allan Freyer

Ohio

Policy Matters Ohio

  • Hannah Halbert
  • Amy Hanauer
  • Daniel Ortiz
  • Zach Schiller
  • Michael Shields

Oklahoma

Oklahoma Policy Institute

  • DeVon Douglass
  • Gene Perry

Oregon

Oregon Center for Public Policy

  • Janet Bauer

Pennsylvania

Keystone Research Center

  • Stephen Herzenberg
  • Mark Price

Rhode Island

The Economic Progress Institute

  • Douglas Hall

Texas

Center for Public Policy Priorities

  • Anne Beeson

Utah

Voices for Utah Children

  • Matthew Weinstein

Vermont

Public Assets Institute

  • Jack Hoffman
  • Stephanie Yu

Washington

Economic Opportunity Institute

  • John Burbank
  • Marilyn Watkins

Insight Center for Community Economic Development

  • Annette Case
  • Anne Price

People’s Action | People’s Action Institute

  • Allyson Fredericksen

West Virginia

West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy

  • Ted Boettner
  • Seth Distefano

Wisconsin

COWS

  • Laura Dresser
  • Mel Meder
  • Joel Rogers

SiX

  • Sam Munger

Wisconsin Budget Project

  • Tamarine Cornelius

Washington, D.C.

Alliance for American Manufacturing

  • Scott Paul

AFL-CIO

  • Damon Silvers

American Federation of Teachers

  • Allison Aguilar

Center for American Progress

  • Rejane Frederick
  • David Madland
  • Jeremy Slevin
  • Rachel West

Center for Community Change

  • Jaimie Worker

Center for Economic and Policy Research

  • Alan Barber
  • Cherrie Bucknor
  • Nick Buffie

DC Fiscal Policy Institute

  • Ilana Boivie

DC Jobs with Justice

  • Ari Schwartz

Economic Policy Institute

  • Kayla Blado
  • David Cooper
  • Ross Eisenbrey
  • Daniel Essrow
  • Janelle Jones
  • Larry Mishel
  • Liz Rose
  • Jessica Schieder
  • Robert Scott
  • Eric Shansby
  • Dianne Stewart

Good Jobs First

  • Greg LeRoy

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research

  • Chandra Childers

Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy (ITEP)

  • Misha Hill

LIUNA- Laborers’ International Union of North America

  • Kevin Reilly

National Skills Coalition

  • Brooke DeRenzis

National Women’s Law Center

  • Jasmine Tucker

North America’s Building Trades Unions

  • Robert Pleasure

Pew Charitable Trusts

  • Joshua Goodman

SEIU

  • Lauren Bonds
  • Steve Hill

TOPOS

  • Meg Bostrom
  • Joe Grady
  • Remy Trupin

Washington Center for Equitable Growth

  • Heather Boushey

[/earn-section][earn-section id="attendees-alphabetical" hide]

Attendees (alphabetical)

Allison Aguilar
American Federation of Teachers
aaguilar@aft.org

Tim Alexander
St. Louis Regional Chamber
talexander@stlregionalchamber.com

Sylvia Allegretto
IRLE UC Berkeley
allegretto@berkeley.edu

Sarah Austin
Maine Center for Economic Policy
saustin@mecep.org

Jason Bailey
Kentucky Center for Economic Policy
jbailey@kypolicy.org

Maura Baldiga
Brandeis University
mbaldiga@brandeis.edu

Alan Barber
CEPR
barber@cepr.net

Laura Barrett
Interfaith Worker Justice
lbarrett@iwj.org

Molly Bashay
HOPE
molly.bashay@hope-ec.org

Janet Bauer
Oregon Center for Public Policy
jbauer@ocpp.org

Anna Baumann
Kentucky Center for Economic Policy
anna@kypolicy.org

Phineas Baxandall
Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center
pbaxandall@massbudget.org

Anne Beeson
Center for Public Policy Priorities
beeson@cppp.org

Noah Berger
Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center
nberger@massbudget.org

Clark Biegler
Minnesota Budget Project
cbiegler@mnbudgetproject.org

Kristian Blackmon
Missouri Jobs with Justice

Kayla Blado
Economic Policy Institute
kblado@epi.org

Amy Blouin
Missouri Budget Project
ablouin@mobudget.org

Ted Boettner
West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy
tboettner@wvpolicy.org

Ilana Boivie
DC Fiscal Policy Institute
iboivie@dcfpi.org

Lauren Bonds
Service Employees International Union
lauren.bonds@seiu.org

Meg Bostrom
Topos Partnership
meg@topospartnership.com

Heather Boushey
Washington Center for Equitable Growth

Gerard Bradley
New Mexico Voices for Children
gerardbrad@yahoo.com

Andrew Bradley
Indiana Institute for Working Families
abradley@incap.org

Cherrie Bucknor
CEPR
bucknor@cepr.net

Nick Buffie
CEPR
queenbee@cepr.net

John Burbank
Economic Opportunity Institute
john@eoionline.org

Alí Bustamante
Research Institute on Social and Economic Policy
albustam@fiu.edu

Vanessa Carter
USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity
vanessa.carter@usc.edu

Annette Case
Insight Center for Community Economic Development
acase@insightcced.org

Chandra Childers
Institute for Women’s Policy Research
childers@iwpr.org

David Cooper
Economic Policy Institute
dcooper@epi.org

Tamarine Cornelius
Wisconsin Budget Project
tamarine@hotmail.com

Maggie Corser
Center for Popular Democracy
mcorser@populardemocracy.org

Tasha Cruzat
Voices for Illinois Children
tcuzat@voices4kids.org

Brooke DeRenzis
National Skills Coalition
brooked@nationalskillscoalition.org

Seth Distefano
West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy
sdistefano@wvpolicy.org

Jeanie Donovan
Jesuit Social Research Institute
jjdonova@loyno.edu

Tamara Draut
Demos
thahn@demos.org

Laura Dresser
COWS
ldresser@cows.org

Asha DuMonthier
East Bay Alliance for a Sustainable Economy
asha.dumonthier@gmail.com

Sally Dworak-Fisher
Public Justice Center
dworak-fishers@publicjustice.org

Ross Eisenbrey
Economic Policy Institute
reisenbrey@epi.org

Daniel Essrow
Economic Policy Institute
dessrow@epi.org

Janice Fine
Rutgers University
fine@work.rutgers.edu

Peter Fisher
Iowa Policy Project
pfisher@iowapolicyproject.org

Adine Forman
Hospitality Training Academy (HTA)
Adine.Forman@LAHTA.org

Jessica Fraser
Indiana Institute for Working Families
jfraser@incap.org

Rejane Frederick
Center for American Progress
rfrederick@americanprogress.org

Allyson Fredericksen
People’s Action | People’s Action Institute
allyson@peoplesaction.org

Allan Freyer
NC Justice Center
allan@ncjustice.org

Joshua Goodman
Pew Charitable Trusts
jgoodman@pewtrusts.org

Colin Gordon
Iowa Policy Project
colin-gordon@uiowa.edu

Joe Grady
Topos Partnership
joe@topospartnership.com

Darnell Chadwick Grisby
American Public Transportation Association

Kim Haddow
Haddow Communications
kimshaddow@gmail.com

Hannah Halbert
Policy Matters Ohio
hhalbert@policymattersohio.org

Anna Haley-Lock
Rutgers University School of Social Work
haleylock@ssw.rutgers.edu

Douglas Hall
The Economic Progress Institute d
hall@economicprogressri.org

Amy Hanuer
Policy Matters Ohio
ahanauer@policymattersohio.org

Clarissa Hayward
Washington University in St. Louis
clarissarhayward@gmail.com

Alexander Hertel-Fernandez
Columbia University
alexander.hertel@gmail.com

Stephen Herzenberg
Keystone Research Center
herzenberg@keystoneresearch.org

Misha Hill
Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy (ITEP)
misha@itep.org

Steve Hill
SEIU
steve.hill@seiu.org

Robbie Hiltonsmith
Demos
rhiltonsmith@demos.org

Jack Hoffman
Public Assets Institute
jack@publicassets.org

Ben Horowitz
Minnesota Budget Project
bhorowitz@mnbudgetproject.org

David Howell
New School
howell@newschool.edu

Laura Huizar
National Employment Law Project
lhuizar@nelp.org

Ken Jacobs
UCB/CLRE
kjacobs9@berkeley.edu

Sarah Jimenez
Community Labor United
srh.jimenez@gmail.com

Janelle Jones
Economic Policy Institute
jjones@epi.org

Pam Joshi
Brandeis University
pamjoshi@brandeis.edu

David Kallick
Fiscal Policy Institute
ddkallick@fiscalpolicy.org

Sam Krinsky
1199SEIU
samuel.krinsky@1199.org

Derek Laney
Missourians Organizing for Reform & Empowerment

Greg LeRoy
Good Jobs First
goodjobs@goodjobsfirst.org

Jesus Loayza
Colorado Center on Law and Policy
jloayza@cclponline.org

David Madland
Center for American Progress
dmadland@americanprogress.org

Tracy McCreery
State of Missouri
tracy.mccreery@house.mo.gov

Claire McKenna
National Employment Law Project
cmckenna@nelp.org

Mel Meder
COWS
mmeder@cows.org

Chirag Mehta
Center for Community Change
cmehta@communitychange.org

Chris Meyer
Maryland Center on Economic Policy
cmeyer@mdeconomy.org

Larry Mishel
Economic Policy Institute

Sam Munger
SiX
sam@stateinnovation.org

Laura Orlando
RILES
orlando@riles.org

Benjamin Orr
Maryland Center on Economic Policy
borr@mdeconomy.org

Daniel Ortiz
Policy Matters Ohio
dortiz@policymattersohio.org

Sejal Parikh
Working Washington
ExecutiveDirector@workingwa.org

Scott Paul
Alliance for American Manufacturing
spaul@aamfg.org

Gene Perry
Oklahoma Policy Institute
gperry@okpolicy.org

Robert Pleasure
North America’s Building Trades Unions

Mark Price
Keystone Research Center
price@keystoneresearch.org

Dustin Pugel
Kentucky Center for Economic Policy
dustin@kypolicy.org

Victoria Ramirez
Working Partnerships USA
victoria@upusa.org

Connie Razza
Center for Popular Democracy
crazza@populardemocracy.org

Kayla Reed
Movement for Black Lives & St. Louis Action Council
kaymreed@gmail.com

Michael Reich
UC Berkeley
michaelreich.prof@gmail.com

Kevin Reilly
LIUNA
kreilly@liuna.org

Marilyn Reyes-Scales
VOCAL-NY
marilynscales17@gmail.com

Audrey Richardson
SEIU
audrey.richardson@seiu.org

Nicole Rodriguez
Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center
nrodriguez@massbudget.org

Michelle Natividad Rodriguez
NELP
mrodriguez@nelp.org

Joel Rogers
COWS
mbright@cows.org

Cyierra Roldan
Fiscal Policy Institute
roldan@fiscalpolicy.org

Liz Rose
EPI
lrose@epi.org

Peter Ruark
Michigan League for Public Policy
pruark@mlpp.org

Miya Saika Chen
Partnership for Working Families
miya@forworkingfamilies.org

Jessica Schieder
EARN/EPI
jschieder@epi.org

Zach Schiller
Policy Matters Ohio
zschiller@policymattersohio.org

Kali Schumitz
Maryland Center on Economic Policy
kschumitz@mdeconomy.org

Ari Schwartz
DC Jobs With Justice
ari@dcjwj.org

Justin Scoggins
USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity
scogginj@usc.edu

Robert Scott
Economic Policy Institute
rscott@epi.org

Zach Silk
Civic Ventures

Eric Shansby
EPI
eshansby@epi.org

Michael Shields
Policy Matters Ohio
mshields@policymattersohio.org

Theda Skocpol
Harvard University
peck@wjh.harvard.edu

Phil Sletten
NH Fiscal Policy Institute
psletten@nhfpi.org

Jeremy Slevin
Center for American Progress
jslevin@americanprogress.org

Ashley Spalding
Kentucky Center for Economic Policy
aspalding@kypolicy.org

Danielle Stanley
Center for Tax and Budget Accountability
dstanley@ctbaonline.org

Pamela Stephens
USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity
pamela.stephens@usc.edu

Stephen Stetson
Alabama Arise
stephen@alarise.org

Andrew Stettner
The Century Foundation
stettner@tcf.org

Dianne Stewart
EARN/EPI
dstewart@epi.org

Harold Stolper
Community Service Society of NY
hstolper@cssny.org

Mike Sutherland
Missouri Budget Project
msutherland@mobudget.org

Mary Beth Testa
MBST Solutions, LLC
marybeth@mbstsolutions.com

Wesley Tharpe
Georgia Budget & Policy Institute
wtharpe@gbpi.org

Sarah Thomason
UC Berkeley Labor Center
sarahthomason@berkeley.edu

Gavin Thornton
Hawaii Appleseed Center for Law and Economic Justice
gavin@hiappleseed.org

Remy Trupin
Topos Partnership
remy@topospartnership.com

Jasmine Tucker
National Women’s Law Center
jtucker@nwlc.org

Madeline Wander
USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity
mwander@usc.edu

Marilyn Watkins
Economic Opportunity Institute
marilyn@eoionline.org

Renell Weathers
Michigan League for Public Policy
rweathers@mlpp.org

Matthew Weinstein
Voices for Utah Children
matthew@utahchildren.org

Rachel West
Center for American Progress
rwest817@yahoo.com

Eleanor Wheeler
Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families
ewheeler@aradvocates.org

Kathy White
Colorado Fiscal Institute
white@coloradofiscal.org

Jon Whiten
New Jersey Policy Perspective
whiten@njpp.org

Rev. Starsky Wilson
Deaconess Foundation
annr@deaconess.org

Kurt Wise
Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center
kwise@massbudget.org

Jaimie Worker
Center for Community Change
jworker@communitychange.org

Stephanie Yu
Public Assets Institute
steph@publicassets.org

Jon Zerolnick
LAANE
jzerolnick@laane.org

[/earn-section][earn-section id="notes" hide]

Notes

[/earn-section]