The State of Working America, 12th edition: Coming Tuesday, Sept. 11

The State of Working America is EPI’s authoritative analysis of the economic conditions of America’s workers. Visit StateofWorkingAmerica.org for up-to-date numbers on the economy, updated when new data are released.


Aug. 29: Unions, inequality, and faltering middle-class wages

Figure AFigure A (continued)

Union coverage rate in the United States, 1973–2011

Source: Author's analysis of Hirsch and Macpherson (2003) and updates from the Union Membership and Coverage Database

 


July 24: U.S. poverty rates higher, safety net weaker than in peer countries

Figure DFigure D (continued)

Child poverty rate in selected developed countries, 2009

Note: The child poverty rate is the share of children living in households with income below half of household-size-adjusted median income.

Source: Adamson (2012, Figure 1b)


May 24: Labor force participation: Cyclical versus structural changes since the start of the Great Recession


May 2: CEO pay and the top 1%: How executive compensation and financial-sector pay have fueled income inequality

Figure AFigure A (continued)

CEO-to-worker compensation ratio, with options granted and options realized,1965–2011

Note: "Options granted" compensation series includes salary, bonus, restricted stock grants, options granted, and long-term incentive payouts for CEOs at the top 350 firms ranked by sales. "Options exercised" compensation series includes salary, bonus, restricted stock grants, options exercised, and long-term incentive payouts for CEOs at the top 350 firms ranked by sales.

Sources: Authors' analysis of data from Compustat ExecuComp database, Bureau of Labor Statistics Current Employment Statistics program, and Bureau of Economic Analysis National Income and Product Accounts Tables


April 26: The wedges between productivity and median compensation growth

”Figure”Figure (continued)

What’s at stake in the states if the federal raise to the overtime pay threshold is not resurrected—and what states can do about it

Figure A

The new federal overtime rule would have benefited working people in every state: Share of salaried workforce in each state benefiting from raising the salary threshold for overtime protection from $23,660 to $47,476 a year

State Share of salaried workforce directly benefiting Number of people directly benefiting Share of total salaried workforce covered under new threshold
Alabama 26.4% 167,000 39.1%
Alaska 17.6% 16,000 25.9%
Arizona 25.8% 258,000 36.0%
Arkansas 30.6% 130,000 44.0%
California 17.9% 1,076,000 27.4%
Colorado 24.0% 248,000 31.7%
Connecticut 16.2% 113,000 23.7%
Delaware 27.7% 49,000 35.6%
Washington D.C. 16.8% 29,000 23.6%
Florida 29.3% 1,068,000 41.9%
Georgia 28.2% 493,000 39.3%
Hawaii 26.4% 57,000 36.9%
Idaho 29.1% 64,000 35.6%
Illinois 22.8% 539,000 31.2%
Indiana 24.9% 248,000 34.8%
Iowa 25.2% 124,000 33.3%
Kansas 21.7% 98,000 29.3%
Kentucky 25.1% 149,000 34.1%
Louisiana 24.5% 174,000 40.8%
Maine 24.2% 46,000 32.6%
Maryland 20.2% 233,000 28.4%
Massachusetts 18.0% 262,000 25.0%
Michigan 20.1% 275,000 28.0%
Minnesota 16.4% 158,000 21.5%
Mississippi 25.3% 88,000 37.8%
Missouri 26.3% 257,000 35.0%
Montana 26.4% 33,000 37.8%
Nebraska 25.8% 81,000 34.7%
Nevada 26.9% 115,000 35.9%
New Hampshire 21.5% 54,000 28.6%
New Jersey 20.0% 410,000 28.3%
New Mexico 25.3% 61,000 37.0%
New York 23.6% 982,000 33.2%
North Carolina 25.7% 425,000 36.6%
North Dakota 27.5% 34,000 35.0%
Ohio 20.9% 351,000 28.7%
Oklahoma 26.2% 154,000 37.5%
Oregon 21.9% 124,000 29.1%
Pennsylvania 22.6% 459,000 30.8%
Rhode Island 21.8% 37,000 29.2%
South Carolina 30.3% 219,000 39.9%
South Dakota 28.2% 32,000 36.1%
Tennessee 29.2% 290,000 40.2%
Texas 25.4% 1,244,000 36.6%
Utah 24.1% 119,000 36.2%
Vermont 22.9% 25,000 31.5%
Virginia 21.1% 333,000 28.9%
Washington 20.2% 232,000 26.6%
West Virginia 30.7% 66,000 40.7%
Wisconsin 21.6% 187,000 27.1%
Wyoming 24.6% 20,000 32.4%

Note: The estimates consider all the workers who would for the first time be automatically eligible for overtime protection because their salary falls under the salary threshold (i.e., their employers could no longer exempt them from protection by claiming their primary job duties are managerial, administrative, or professional in nature). Not included are a subset of salaried California and New York workers already covered by state thresholds higher than the old federal threshold.

Source: EPI analysis of the U.S. Department of Labor's proposed (July 6, 2015) and final (May 18, 2016) rule, “Defining and Delimiting the Exemptions for Executive, Administrative, Professional, Outside Sales and Computer Employees,” 29 CFR Part 541; and Current Population Survey Outgoing Rotation Group microdata, 2015

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March 7: Entry-level workers’ wages fell in lost decade

Figure BFigure B (continued)

Entry-level wages of male and female college graduates


Other media outlets and blogs that have covered the data include BBC News, Forbes, Gawker, Huffington Post, In These Times, MarketPlace RadioNational Journal, PoliticoReuters, Village Voice, and the Washington Post.