Book | Education

The Way We Were? The Myths and Realities of America’s Student Achievement

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September 1998 | A Century Foundation Press book

The Way We Were?


The Myths and Realities of America’s Student Achievement

    
 
by Richard Rothstein 

According to conventional wisdom, American public schools have suffered a terrible decline and are in need of dramatic reform. Today’s high school students, it is alleged, display an ignorance of things that every elementary student knew a generation ago. American business leaders warn that rising illiteracy and “innumeracy” threaten our competitiveness in the global marketplace. What evidence are these criticisms based on, and does it hold up under examination?

In this book, Richard Rothstein analyzes the statistical and anecdotal evidence and shows that public schools, by and large, are not falling down on the job of educating our children. To the contrary, by many measures they are doing better than in the past. Minority students have improved their test scores significantly, and overall dropout rates have fallen. Moreover, our schools educate more poor children, and more children whose native language is foreign, than ever before. Rothstein shows in convincing detail how standardized tests comparing American students’ performance today with that of the past, and with student performance internationally, frequently confuse apples with oranges. The nation’s student population today is very different from that of decades ago and from the student population in other nations.

Read more or purchase online from The Century Foundation Press (tcf.org).


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