The Hispanic–white wage gap is inflated by the large share of Hispanic immigrants: Adjusted wage gaps between Hispanic men and non-Hispanic white men in the U.S., by gender, with and without controls for immigrant status, 1994–2017

Year Hispanic men Hispanic men, with immigrant status Hispanic women Hispanic women, with immigrant status 
1994 16.9% 9.7% 33.3% 27.8%
1995 18.8% 12.0% 35.1% 29.7%
1996 19.7% 13.8% 33.8% 29.2%
1997 18.2% 11.8% 34.3% 30.1%
1998 17.9% 11.8% 34.0% 30.1%
1999 17.1% 11.1% 36.1% 31.5%
2000 17.8% 12.0% 35.1% 31.0%
2001 17.4% 12.0% 33.9% 29.8%
2002 16.8% 10.9% 34.3% 30.1%
2003 18.7% 12.1% 33.1% 29.3%
2004 17.7% 12.1% 32.9% 29.0%
2005 16.7% 11.1% 33.4% 29.5%
2006 17.0% 12.5% 34.9% 31.1%
2007 17.2% 12.6% 33.7% 29.1%
2008 16.8% 12.0% 32.7% 28.8%
2009 17.3% 11.7% 33.5% 29.9%
2010 16.7% 10.8% 33.2% 29.0%
2011 16.0% 11.5% 31.1% 28.0%
2012 17.0% 12.4% 33.4% 29.3%
2013 15.8% 11.9% 31.8% 28.8%
2014 15.4% 11.5% 32.2% 29.0%
2015 14.5% 11.2% 32.6% 30.0%
2016 13.5% 10.4% 32.8% 30.1%
2017 14.9% 12.3% 33.1% 30.5%

Note: The wage gap is how much less, in percent terms, the average member of each identified subgroup makes than the average non-Hispanic white man. The wages compared are average hourly wages of full-time workers ages 18–64. The  dotted “with immigrant status” lines show the wage gap adjusted for education, experience, region of residence, and immigrant status, while the solid lines show the wage gap adjusted for education, experience, and region of residence. We control for immigrant status by including binary variables indicating whether the respondent is foreign-born or a naturalized citizen (versus a U.S.-born citizen) and whether the person had lived in the U.S. for less than five years at the time of the survey.

Source: EPI analysis of Current Population Survey Outgoing Rotation Group microdata from the U.S. Census Bureau

View the underlying data on epi.org.