Mexican American, Puerto Rican, and Cuban American women have all narrowed the wage gap with white men since 1980: Adjusted wage gaps between Hispanic women (by national origin) and non-Hispanic white men in U.S., 1980–2016

Year Mexican American Puerto Rican Cuban American
1980 56.7% 45.9% 48.3%
1981 55.3% 45.6% 49.6%
1982 52.9% 45.2% 49.6%
1983 51.5% 43.9% 49.3%
1984 50.9% 42.5% 48.6%
1985 50.2% 40.9% 48.5%
1986 49.4% 40.6% 51.5%
1987 48.5% 41.1% 52.4%
1988 47.4% 40.9% 50.8%
1989 46.5% 39.7% 45.0%
1990 45.0% 37.2% 41.8%
1991 43.7% 36.4% 37.4%
1992 42.6% 34.1% 36.2%
1993 41.8% 32.5% 34.1%
1994 41.5% 31.1% 37.9%
1995 41.0% 32.5% 41.6%
1996 40.2% 33.4% 43.3%
1997 39.9% 32.8% 43.2%
1998 39.5% 32.3% 41.6%
1999 39.0% 33.6% 42.6%
2000 36.2% 32.4% 39.1%
2001 33.7% 28.9% 36.0%
2002 31.3% 24.4% 32.0%
2003 31.6% 23.5% 30.4%
2004 31.4% 24.6% 30.7%
2005 32.0% 26.0% 30.7%
2006 31.8% 25.8% 31.2%
2007 32.7% 25.9% 29.6%
2008 32.9% 26.5% 29.3%
2009 32.9% 25.5% 28.2%
2010 31.6% 23.9% 26.9%
2011 30.9% 23.7% 26.2%
2012 30.5% 24.6% 27.8%
2013 31.4% 24.2% 28.0%
2014 32.3% 22.7% 26.9%
2015 33.0% 24.0% 23.7%
2016 33.5% 24.7% 24.1%

Note: The wage gap is how much less, in percent terms, the average member of each identified subgroup makes than the average non-Hispanic white man (adjusted for education level, experience, and region of residence). The wages compared are average hourly wages and the population is full-time workers ages 18–64. Wage gaps reflect a three-year moving average, with 1979 included in the average for 1980 and 2017 included in the average for 2016.

Source: EPI analysis of Current Population Survey Outgoing Rotation Group microdata from the U.S. Census Bureau

View the underlying data on epi.org.