Hispanic men and women have raised their education levels but have been unable to close the education gap with white men and women: Shares of U.S. workers with a bachelor's degree or more education, by Hispanic ethnicity and gender, 1979–2017

Year White men Hispanic men White women  Hispanic women 
1979 22.5% 8.1 18.5 8.6
1980 23.6 8.5 19.4 10.1
1981 24.1 8.3 19.8 8.3
1982 25.4 8.8 21.0 10.7
1983 26.3 8.7 22.2 10.4
1984 26.1 9.4 23.0 10.1
1985 26.5 9.9 23.8 12.0
1986 26.9 10.1 23.8 12.6
1987 27.3 10.1 24.4 12.8
1988 27.9 10.7 25.0 12.4
1989 28.0 9.2 25.9 11.5
1990 28.2 8.7 26.7 11.1
1991 28.7 9.2 27.5 12.8
1992 28.6 9.3 27.8 12.8
1993 29.0 9.4 28.4 13.2
1994 29.7 9.6 29.1 12.3
1995 30.2 9.2 29.6 12.8
1996 30.2 9.8 30.6 13.2
1997 30.3 9.8 31.1 13.2
1998 31.1 10.1 31.7 13.6
1999 31.9 9.9 32.2 13.9
2000 32.5 9.7 32.4 14.5
2001 32.8 10.1 33.3 13.8
2002 33.5 10.6 34.4 14.9
2003 34.1 10.9 34.7 15.5
2004 34.4 10.7 35.7 16.0
2005 33.9 10.6 36.4 15.9
2006 34.0 11.2 36.7 17.0
2007 35.0 11.9 38.5 18.0
2008 36.1 11.9 39.6 19.0
2009 37.4 13.2 41.0 19.6
2010 38.1 13.8 42.1 20.9
2011 38.2 12.9 40.0 20.0
2012 38.6 13.5 43.9 21.8
2013 39.2 14.5 44.8 22.4
2014 39.0 15.0 45.6 23.7
2015 40.2 15.3 47.0 23.5
2016 40.5 16.2 47.5 24.1
2017 40.9 16.4 48.9 25.9

Note: The population is full-time workers ages 18–64.

Source: EPI analysis of Current Population Survey Outgoing Rotation Group microdata from the U.S. Census Bureau

View the underlying data on epi.org.